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Thread: Cooking!

  1. #51
    Varsity Member tdig's Avatar
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    @redbeardedmike - eggs are a great start. ive had tremendous success early on but i know a few others who were discouraged with their first few cooks. whatever you do make sure you confirm the temp is reading accurate before you cook anything. ive done salmon a few times for 20-25 minutes at 123F that is just stupid good. bagged it with some olive oil and a mixture of maple/miso/rice wine vin then glazed it when it came out with the same mixture and torched it.

  2. #52
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    @tdig - Thanks for the thoughts. I can poach eggs (and the circulator can't really replicate that). Onsen eggs (or 60 minute eggs or whatever) seem like they would work in some applications, but I'd generally prefer the texture of poached. I will probably go to work on my 1.5" thick pork chops that I've been saving for this day.

    Good tip on temping the water. I did make a sweet potato dish first off and it seemed accurate to within a degree or so, which is probably as good as one can expect.

    Do you torch the skin on the bagged salmon when done or serve as-is?

    I'll report back.

  3. #53
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    Wow. I'm really impressed tdig, everything looks great.

  4. #54
    Varsity Member tdig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by redbeardedmike View Post

    Do you torch the skin on the bagged salmon when done or serve as-is?

    I'll report back.
    I prefer to cut it off before bagging. You can save it and crisp it up pretty quick in cast-iron if you want or toss it under the broiler.

  5. #55
    Varsity Member tdig's Avatar
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    @redbeardedmike forgot you should brine the salmon first too. Here's the recipe I started with but went with 123f instead of 122.

    http://cookingmadly.com/sous-vide-miso-maple-salmon/

  6. #56
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    I didn't see any mentions of any of the Ottolenghi books but the recipes are great and really let the vegetables shine through, instead of being an afterthought. I haven't cooked much lately as I just got back Stateside after being away for 2+ months but I've been on a chai making kick lately with freshly ground tea masala (spices) and ginger. Works great in the Northeast cold

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    Making a good risotto is a great way to impress dinner guests or a date but to make it the traditional way is extremely time intensive. There's not many of us who have 40 minutes to simmer and stir rice will slowly adding broth to it though and the rice cooker methods just don't quite measure up. I finally found a way to do it though that is extremely easy and fairly hands off. I made it this past weekend and it worked really well, it came out creamy and light with a uniform consistency. I figured I'd share.

    Ingredients:
    • 1.5 cups Arborio Rice
    • 5 cups simmering chicken stock, divided
    • 1 cup grated parmesan cheese
    • 1/2 cup dry white wine
    • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, diced
    • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
    • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
    • 1 cup frozen peas


    Directions:
    Preheat oven to 350˚F

    Place rice and 4 cups chicken stock in dutch oven (just a covered pan that can go in the oven). Cover and bake for 45 minutes, until most of the liquid is absorbed and the rice is al dente. Remove from the oven, add the remaining cup of chicken stock, Parmesan, wine, butter, salt, and pepper. Stir vigorously for 2-3 minutes until rice is thick and creamy. Add peas and stir until heated through. Serve hot.


    Any meat or veggies can be substituted for the peas, just prepare them beforehand as you would for any other risotto recipe and add them at the last step. I was skeptical at first that this would work but it was just as good as the traditional method with very little work.

    Good luck and hopefully your guests/dates enjoy!

  8. #58
    Super Moderator greg_s's Avatar
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    Alice waters also has a perfect risotto recipe in her book The Art of Simple Food. It is not terribly time consuming either, you just have to dote a bit.
    "You don't need money to dress better than you do" - Salvatore Romano

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by pratyk View Post
    I didn't see any mentions of any of the Ottolenghi books but the recipes are great and really let the vegetables shine through, instead of being an afterthought. I haven't cooked much lately as I just got back Stateside after being away for 2+ months but I've been on a chai making kick lately with freshly ground tea masala (spices) and ginger. Works great in the Northeast cold
    +1

    I have the Plenty cookbook and the brussel sprouts with tofu and the mango eggplant soba noodles are really good. Embrace the fish sauce.

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