Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29

Thread: Jackets / Sweaters to keep warm in a cold office

  1. #11
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    466
    Mentioned
    104 Post(s)
    Quoted
    194 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    How about getting a smaller heater for under your desk?
    Decent idea, but my goal with asking this question was to find a less-embarassing way to stay warm at work. To me, a space heater is just about on par with wearing a coat indoors for the ridiculous factor.

    I've been encouraged by other comments here which have urged me to reevaluate my base layer - I think that by notably stepping that up, I'll be fine.

  2. #12
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,319
    Mentioned
    70 Post(s)
    Quoted
    520 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Decent idea, but my goal with asking this question was to find a less-embarassing way to stay warm at work. To me, a space heater is just about on par with wearing a coat indoors for the ridiculous factor.

    I've been encouraged by other comments here which have urged me to reevaluate my base layer - I think that by notably stepping that up, I'll be fine.
    You know your office best but I don't think a small heater under the desk is ridiculous. I've seen them in almost every office I've worked at. The key is the right size and not making sure it's too loud. My coworkers is very small and not loud. Honeywell. The benefit is it gives you flexibility if going somewhere else. With base layers if you get stuck in a hot room you are stuck. You cannot easily remove a base layer like a sweater, or jacket.

  3. #13
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    466
    Mentioned
    104 Post(s)
    Quoted
    194 Post(s)
    Follow up question for the fine folks on this thread (@idvsego, @hockeysc23, @Ron etc):

    I'm looking at base layers, and these seems to be different weights. Also, most options are predominantly polyester (see here or here). Generally, I try to avoid poly like the plauge... but in this case, the synthetic nature might make it more warm? What do you think of those options?

    The most ideal I know, would be something merino.... but I just can't justify spending ~$100 on ONE base layer. I'd be looking to buy 5 or so total, and $500 is more than I want to invest here. I was thinking $25-30 each. Any specific suggestions for layers that would work? Beyond choice itself, what weight should I look for - Medium weight or Heavy weight (which seem to be rated for ACTUALLY freezing temps)?

    Thoughts / suggestions for what i should go with?

  4. #14
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    466
    Mentioned
    104 Post(s)
    Quoted
    194 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    You know your office best but I don't think a small heater under the desk is ridiculous. The benefit is it gives you flexibility if going somewhere else. With base layers if you get stuck in a hot room you are stuck. You cannot easily remove a base layer like a sweater, or jacket.
    Didn't mean to disparage your comment, it's just that I'd want something that A) keeps me warm regardless of where I am (I work in software sales, so I frequently use meeting rooms away from my desk for customer calls) and B) is less visible.

    I'm not as worried about issues taking off a layer, because I've never be too hot at work. If I do encounter that problem, I can scale back the warmth rating of the base layer, and will have just acquired a good base for snow excursions.

  5. #15
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    1,319
    Mentioned
    70 Post(s)
    Quoted
    520 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Didn't mean to disparage your comment, it's just that I'd want something that A) keeps me warm regardless of where I am (I work in software sales, so I frequently use meeting rooms away from my desk for customer calls) and B) is less visible.

    I'm not as worried about issues taking off a layer, because I've never be too hot at work. If I do encounter that problem, I can scale back the warmth rating of the base layer, and will have just acquired a good base for snow excursions.
    No offense taken Just throwing out some alternative ideas. Best of luck finding one that works.

  6. #16
    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    5,588
    Mentioned
    434 Post(s)
    Quoted
    2099 Post(s)
    I wouldn't endorse the baselayer idea because if you get overheated and need to de-layer, the fact that your extra layer is underneath everything else makes that a pain. Something that's easy to slip on and off as needed is probably your best bet. I have (or had... I just cleaned it and found some kind of moth hole in it, RIP) a lightweight tobacco brown cardigan that I leave at my office that can be worn to court if necessary. But if you're in tech, you are probably able to get away with a lot more casual fare. In that case I'd really recommend something light a light down vest. It is easy to layer, easy to slip on and off, easy to stuff into a bag or backpack, and won't look out of place in most environments in Seattle. (You could even wear it under a blazer in a pinch.) Depending on your style and your environment you could go loud and colorful or very basic and neutral.
    Ben

  7. #17
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    350
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Quoted
    106 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Follow up question for the fine folks on this thread (@idvsego, @hockeysc23, @Ron etc):

    I'm looking at base layers, and these seems to be different weights. Also, most options are predominantly polyester (see here or here). Generally, I try to avoid poly like the plauge... but in this case, the synthetic nature might make it more warm? What do you think of those options?

    The most ideal I know, would be something merino.... but I just can't justify spending ~$100 on ONE base layer. I'd be looking to buy 5 or so total, and $500 is more than I want to invest here. I was thinking $25-30 each. Any specific suggestions for layers that would work? Beyond choice itself, what weight should I look for - Medium weight or Heavy weight (which seem to be rated for ACTUALLY freezing temps)?

    Thoughts / suggestions for what i should go with?
    I don't have any specific recommendations at your price point. The one I was going to link you is 3 times your budget. Also be aware that the good one's don't hold odor or sweat however so you might be able to do with less then 5.

    @LesserBlackDog makes a good point about using the top layers rather then the bottom for the extra warmth. You know your environment best and what will work for you.

    The sweater you linked from Gap is the one I have. I have it in several colors. My house is always cool and I can't keep it on in the house. It's just too warm.

    The fleece lined base layers provide a LOT of warmth. My wife also runs cold and she was toasty with them skiing. For me they were fine on the chair lift but once I was on a trail I'd be dripping like a wet sponge.

  8. #18
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    344
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Quoted
    96 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny View Post
    Follow up question for the fine folks on this thread (@idvsego, @hockeysc23, @Ron etc):

    I'm looking at base layers, and these seems to be different weights. Also, most options are predominantly polyester (see here or here). Generally, I try to avoid poly like the plauge... but in this case, the synthetic nature might make it more warm? What do you think of those options?

    The most ideal I know, would be something merino.... but I just can't justify spending ~$100 on ONE base layer. I'd be looking to buy 5 or so total, and $500 is more than I want to invest here. I was thinking $25-30 each. Any specific suggestions for layers that would work? Beyond choice itself, what weight should I look for - Medium weight or Heavy weight (which seem to be rated for ACTUALLY freezing temps)?

    Thoughts / suggestions for what i should go with?
    Could go with plain old cotton. Long sleeve waffle knit T and long john bottoms. They won't wick as well as a polyester fabric but if you're just at your desk or walking around the office significant sweating is probably not happening anyway. An extra full length layer on the legs, regardless of whether it's cotton, synthetic or wool, makes a big difference.

    That said, I don't see anything wrong with a poly-synthetic base layer. A lot of people here have said good things about the Uniqlo Heat Tech long johns and they are affordable. I really like the Patagonia Capilene (real expensive) and Polartec Power Dry (somewhat less expensive but still not cheap) base layers but only really use them for active pursuits - cold weather hiking and biking, cross country and downhill skiing, etc. except when I'm home in Michigan during the winter. There I usually wear long john bottoms daily as it's about the only way to layer up below the waist and as I said it makes a big difference. I've only got 3 pair of long john bottoms and am considering ordering a couple pair from the aforementioned Uniqlo to give me more capacity to layer up more often in the winter.
    “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    91
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Quoted
    51 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    The sweater you linked from Gap is the one I have. I have it in several colors. My house is always cool and I can't keep it on in the house. It's just too warm.
    That Gap shaker stitch cardigan has popped up time and time on this forum over the past few months, including in the WIWT threads. And for good reason - it looks great, is hefty and warm, and cheap! I bought one and love it. I think this should be strongly considered for the next Dappered Day!

    Based on your description of your preference and environment, I think trying a warmer base is the best first step. At your price range, I have heard a lot of good things about the 32 Degrees base layers, which can be found at Costco, Amazon and other places. I have no personal experience with them. I recently bought Amazon's Peak Velocity poly/spandex "fitted thermal long sleeve shirt" and thought it was great. Seems thick and sturdy and has a sort of brushed interior that felt great against the skin. And it really is fitted. I think it'd make a great base.

    Also, I don't believe anyone has mentioned the bottom half. You could step up to corduroy or flannel/moleskin pants. Another alternative is flannel and fleece-lined jeans or chinos. I have some flannel-lined chinos from Gap and they are incredibly soft and warm. Too warm for my office, but I run hot.

  10. #20
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    350
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Quoted
    106 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Burner View Post
    That Gap shaker stitch cardigan has popped up time and time on this forum over the past few months, including in the WIWT threads. And for good reason - it looks great, is hefty and warm, and cheap! I bought one and love it. I think this should be strongly considered for the next Dappered Day!

    Based on your description of your preference and environment, I think trying a warmer base is the best first step. At your price range, I have heard a lot of good things about the 32 Degrees base layers, which can be found at Costco, Amazon and other places. I have no personal experience with them. I recently bought Amazon's Peak Velocity poly/spandex "fitted thermal long sleeve shirt" and thought it was great. Seems thick and sturdy and has a sort of brushed interior that felt great against the skin. And it really is fitted. I think it'd make a great base.

    Also, I don't believe anyone has mentioned the bottom half. You could step up to corduroy or flannel/moleskin pants. Another alternative is flannel and fleece-lined jeans or chinos. I have some flannel-lined chinos from Gap and they are incredibly soft and warm. Too warm for my office, but I run hot.
    And it frequently goes on sale. I think I got it for 40% + another 10% off during a sale.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •