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Thread: Casual prestige/status clothing brands that are good quality and value?

  1. #11
    Varsity Member mebejoseph's Avatar
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    Thanks to everyone--very helpful to help me get my thinking straight on this.
    WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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    I don't really post often but I felt the need to here. I've always enjoyed reading your posts as I have always found them helpful, encouraging and informative.

    First off congrats on taking a chance and achieving your financial success. That is something very much to be celebrated.

    If you want to splurge for higher end clothing because the quality is superior, it brings you pleasure and to reward yourself I say absolutely.

    To do it to fit in, or for some perceived acceptance is doing it for the wrong reasons, in my opinion.

    A friend of mine who I went to college with came from a very wealthy family. Net worth well north of 8 figured.

    Half way through college his parents finally gave him a car. It was 15 years old and the defroster didn't work.

    Best of luck, whatever you decide.

  3. #13
    Varsity Member mebejoseph's Avatar
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    Thank you and others for responses. They are helping me get my head wrapped around things.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron View Post
    I don't really post often but I felt the need to here. I've always enjoyed reading your posts as I have always found them helpful, encouraging and informative.

    First off congrats on taking a chance and achieving your financial success. That is something very much to be celebrated.

    If you want to splurge for higher end clothing because the quality is superior, it brings you pleasure and to reward yourself I say absolutely.

    To do it to fit in, or for some perceived acceptance is doing it for the wrong reasons, in my opinion.

    A friend of mine who I went to college with came from a very wealthy family. Net worth well north of 8 figured.

    Half way through college his parents finally gave him a car. It was 15 years old and the defroster didn't work.

    Best of luck, whatever you decide.
    WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

  4. #14
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    AE makes some casual clothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mebejoseph View Post
    Thank you and others for responses. They are helping me get my head wrapped around things.
    I think people who either earned their fortunes, as you have, or who were trained from childhood to be responsible for their future inheritance, tend to be very careful with their $$ (they didn't get rich by blowing it, right?) and discreet about displaying it. To quote a roommate I had who was quite well-off but hardly ever let slip that fact, "I don't mind spending money; I just hate wasting it." So he did buy nicer, more expensive things, but only if the increase in price was justified, and to him brand/designer alone was a scam, and an undesirably visible display of his wealth to boot. Definite no go. Flashy overpriced clothing is like flashy overpriced anything: primarily marketed to and used by people who stumble into a windfall which they did not have to grind for, and/or for which they were not prepared. A painful example is my best friend's sister-in-law and her Old Money husband. The husband was born into this nonsense and trained to be very careful about it. The sister-in-law grew up poor but also spoiled, and married into this. She's her husband's fatal weakness though, and he indulges her spending habits. So my buddy calls her "that same clueless girl from LA, but now with a rocketpack of money blasting her around." Their spending habits couldn't be more different. So assuming your clients are of the smart and responsible inclination, I would be very surprised if they judged you for, say, your Goodthreads shirt.

    Now all that said, if you've got the cash, sure why not spend a bit more? Spending more just because it's John Varvatos is kind of silly, but if the price increase is due to increased quality, maker's provenance, 1st world labor, or something else you care about, go for it! For boring but good casual shirts, I'm guessing Gitman Bros is the go-to? They have their own brand, and they also make for Paul Grangaard's new company, Circle Rock. Actually, now that I mention it, Circle Rock is probably a cool one-stop-shop for boring but high quality Made in USA casualwear in general. I think Drake's has the same idea, only a bit less old-man and more Instagram. Their shirts are made in England, but more expensive too.

    Since you mentioned resortwear, there are always the old reliables of Sunspel, John Smedley, and Orelebar Brown. The scored a marketing coup by getting in with the James Bond franchise. I know a lot of guys who swear by them, but they seem overpriced to me. YMMV. Are these meetings critical for bringing in billable hours, i.e. is there a sales component to it? If so, the sales guy in me would argue that this form of overpriced might justify itself. These things cost what they do not because of the whims of fashion but because of provenance and old-school manufacturing, which rich clients might recognize and appreciate.

    This might also be informative: On Riviera Style
    Last edited by stuffedsuperdud; October 21st, 2019 at 02:56 AM.

  6. #16
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    Oh I know exactly what you mean. Got a sizeable income increase recently but work is a much more dressed down place (not because i'm super important though!)

    Some tips:

    1. don't wear jeans. yeah, there are expensive high end jeans...but it's hard for jeans to "look expensive" at a glance. everyone wears jeans and outside of shade/fades they all look the same. i stick with grey 5 pockets
    2. wear henleys. it's the "edgy" thing to do atm
    3. texture, different fabric helps stand out quietly. silk, cashmere, wool can all add "depth" which makes clothes look more expensive
    4. polos are easy to go cheap on but look expensive: they just have to fit well. i like the BR don't sweat it polos
    5. suede shoes, the silhouette of dress shoes w.o looking like you're trying to dress up
    6. a nice non-dress watch
    7. focus on outerwear: it's very easy to spot good outerwear compared to cheaper options and it's replaced my blazers (which i still wear occasionally over a henley)
    8. don't be afraid to buy what should be "cheap" pieces from more expensive places. my favorite henleys are from suitsupply. they are $64 a pop but the fabric is amazing (for cotton), the fit is great and honestly they feel amazing on me
    9. if you need some inspiration, watch billions or succession to see how rich people dress casually
    10. don't overthink it too much, just live your life, be comfortable and enjoy your life

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    I work for a finance company headquartered in Miami and often go to high-end resorts (like this) for my job. Here are the pieces that I wear. Get an Orelbar Brown swimsuit on clearance. A couple of linen shirts from Kamakura. An unstructured, unlined blazer from Suitsupply. Woven loafers from Allen Edmonds. Kent Wang polos with non-roll collars. Shorts from Bonobos.

    None of these pieces are "budget" item, but they're all simple, elegant, high quality and unbranded.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scofield View Post
    Oh I know exactly what you mean. Got a sizeable income increase recently but work is a much more dressed down place (not because i'm super important though!)

    Some tips:

    1. don't wear jeans. yeah, there are expensive high end jeans...but it's hard for jeans to "look expensive" at a glance. everyone wears jeans and outside of shade/fades they all look the same. i stick with grey 5 pockets
    2. wear henleys. it's the "edgy" thing to do atm
    3. texture, different fabric helps stand out quietly. silk, cashmere, wool can all add "depth" which makes clothes look more expensive
    4. polos are easy to go cheap on but look expensive: they just have to fit well. i like the BR don't sweat it polos
    5. suede shoes, the silhouette of dress shoes w.o looking like you're trying to dress up
    6. a nice non-dress watch
    7. focus on outerwear: it's very easy to spot good outerwear compared to cheaper options and it's replaced my blazers (which i still wear occasionally over a henley)
    8. don't be afraid to buy what should be "cheap" pieces from more expensive places. my favorite henleys are from suitsupply. they are $64 a pop but the fabric is amazing (for cotton), the fit is great and honestly they feel amazing on me
    9. if you need some inspiration, watch billions or succession to see how rich people dress casually
    10. don't overthink it too much, just live your life, be comfortable and enjoy your life
    I don’t agree with some of your tips and think you’re misunderstanding the proposition of “expensive” clothing. It’s not really about being able to recognize expensive materials (there’s no way you can tell at first glance whether a sweater is made from merino wool or cashmere), it’s more that:

    1) “expensive” clothing offers more ranges of fits (since they’re less designed to fit mass market) so you can probably find stuff that fits you better

    2) you get more options along the design dimension. For example I strongly disagree with your claim that all jeans look the same. Higher end jeans come in a variety of rises and tapers that change the look and formality.

    Ultimately your 10) is what matters the most.
    Instagram: WoofOrWeft

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    Being confident in yourself that you belong among them is honestly what is going to make the difference. I realize that isnt exactly a switch you can flip, but it will mean more than any label. My advice is look to the preppies, they do quality casual clothes like no one else. Not vineyard vines, real preppy stuff like J. Press, shaggy dog, boast.
    https://www.saltwaternewengland.com/
    http://www.ivy-style.com/

    It seems like you want flashier clothes, which arent usually described with things like quality or value. From my experience Burberry makes some great stuff, gucci shoes are amazing, coach shoes are nice, RRL, etc. However, you said there was no way you'd spend $1,000 on a shirt so you kinda need to make up your mind on what you want to do. Cant stay thrifty and expect to knock people out with your labels.

  10. #20
    Varsity Member mebejoseph's Avatar
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    As you all recognize, there's a big psychological component to this for me and it's not just about fashion or clothing.

    Wrapping my head around a sudden changed paradigm has been a challenge--a good challenge, no doubt--but one that makes me feel a little disconnected from the perception I've built of myself over the years.

    I was very happy with the money I was making and very happy with the lifestyle it afforded me. Just because I'm suddenly making a few more dollars over the last year doesn't mean I need to be unhappy with those things now. It all feels a little surreal and strange because up until the end of last year, my plan was to work out my career at the level I was, but then this opportunity just fell into my lap out of nowhere.

    So, I appreciate all the thoughtful advice in both areas. I'm not going to take up the room to "reply with quote" to everything you all said, but I do want to express appreciation to you all:
    @Token @IanEr @Loafer28 @Evenflow @armedferret @Ron @Galcobar @Stuffedsuperdad @theplayerking @whereismurder

    All that said, I do like to have a few new things when I go on vacation, so ordered a couple of causal Billy Reid shirts. And while I wasn't asking for dress shirt advice, I ordered a few Ledbury shirts to wear to the nice dinners instead of my Paul Fredrick shirts--I really like the Ledbury shirts. I picked up a few of their casual shirts a year or two ago at Nordstrom Rack for about $40 each, but this time I actually got them from Ledbury (okay, they were 30% off because I got three).

    I've also been in the process of donating some of my lower-end things that I don't necessarily feel good wearing. After this, I might even get rid of a few more pairs of shoes (and replace them with something I like better).

    And I'm still struggling with the idea of even entry level luxury watches. Why are they better than a Citizen Eco Drive? I think those are the best watches ever. You don't need to wind them or change batteries or worry about them and some of them look great. See? My mother drilled that thriftiness into this brain of mine.
    WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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