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Thread: Response to: Mindfulness, Weight loss, Overdrinking

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    Response to: Mindfulness, Weight loss, Overdrinking

    This post is in response to today's article by Joe - https://dappered.com/2019/10/how-a-s...lothes-better/

    I thought this post was a great reminder how simple changes in your life can make a big impact. Over-drinking and over-eating is very common. At some point, we don't even realize we aren't getting much happiness or joy out of it anymore, and are simply doing it because we are used to it. It's a habit. But habits can be broken, the hardest part is simply accepting that it needs to change, then actually WANTING to change. You can't do it because someone else said that you should. It needs to be YOU that makes the decision to be better.

    I little over a year ago, I was in a similar spot to Joe. I was commonly drinking and eating too much. My physical appearance wasn't what anyone would call overweight, but I was feeling sloppy. Unlike Joe, I hadn't gone to the gym much at all so I was also feeling pretty weak. I made a decision to commit to simply going to the gym twice a week, and tracking all of my calories each day (I used MyFitnessPal). Simply by tracking calories and being aware of where I'm overeating and drinking really helped to get me back on track. I definitely still had cravings, and I wouldn't deny myself completely. I would simply just maybe have one drink in a spot where I'd typically have 3 or 4, or 1 slice of pizza when I'd typically eat the whole damn pie. Eventually, I didn't even crave the unhealthy stuff anymore, and looked forward to putting good food/fuel into my body for my workouts. I also tracked all of my workouts to help see my progress at the gym. Always trying to do more reps, or lift more weight than the previous workout.

    Now I'm looking back and over a year has passed. I'm about 10 pounds lighter, even though I've gained about 7-8 lbs of muscle. I've actually had multiple friends call me "jacked", for the first time in my life. By the way, I'm 38 years old, so I'm not exactly young.

    Just hoping someone reads this and decides to make a change. It all starts with just a couple very small changes, then once those changes become habit, you add a little more, then a little more. Challenge yourself, you'll be amazed at the results you see in a short time. It's never too late.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyjobe View Post
    This post is in response to today's article by Joe - https://dappered.com/2019/10/how-a-s...lothes-better/

    I thought this post was a great reminder how simple changes in your life can make a big impact. Over-drinking and over-eating is very common. At some point, we don't even realize we aren't getting much happiness or joy out of it anymore, and are simply doing it because we are used to it. It's a habit. But habits can be broken, the hardest part is simply accepting that it needs to change, then actually WANTING to change. You can't do it because someone else said that you should. It needs to be YOU that makes the decision to be better.

    I little over a year ago, I was in a similar spot to Joe. I was commonly drinking and eating too much. My physical appearance wasn't what anyone would call overweight, but I was feeling sloppy. Unlike Joe, I hadn't gone to the gym much at all so I was also feeling pretty weak. I made a decision to commit to simply going to the gym twice a week, and tracking all of my calories each day (I used MyFitnessPal). Simply by tracking calories and being aware of where I'm overeating and drinking really helped to get me back on track. I definitely still had cravings, and I wouldn't deny myself completely. I would simply just maybe have one drink in a spot where I'd typically have 3 or 4, or 1 slice of pizza when I'd typically eat the whole damn pie. Eventually, I didn't even crave the unhealthy stuff anymore, and looked forward to putting good food/fuel into my body for my workouts. I also tracked all of my workouts to help see my progress at the gym. Always trying to do more reps, or lift more weight than the previous workout.

    Now I'm looking back and over a year has passed. I'm about 10 pounds lighter, even though I've gained about 7-8 lbs of muscle. I've actually had multiple friends call me "jacked", for the first time in my life. By the way, I'm 38 years old, so I'm not exactly young.

    Just hoping someone reads this and decides to make a change. It all starts with just a couple very small changes, then once those changes become habit, you add a little more, then a little more. Challenge yourself, you'll be amazed at the results you see in a short time. It's never too late.
    First of all, congrats. I am glad someone referenced this article. I read it and thought where is the content? I don't want to be offensive but it seemed like it boiled down to he thought oh I don't like it anymore? So I am done?

    I am trying not to trivialize his change and growth. Those are awesome for him and anyone. But it seems he just went oh do I like this and didn't just do things on autopilot? Did I miss something?

    To me a mindfulness trick would be to track like you said in an app to see oh you have enough calories, recognizing that food is a vehicle for nutrition not an event, etc. The most important to me as you mentioned it goal setting ... either food, beating a previous workout etc.

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    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
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    ^ I was also looking for the mindfulness technique/advice and did not find it.
    Ben

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    I found myself in a similar situation to Joe at the beginning of this year, after a terrible 2017 (working 65 hr weeks the first half of the year and finding out a close family member had cancer and then losing them at the end of the year) my drinking was on autopilot all through 2018, and that meant about a fifth of gin every 2-3 days (great plan Alex) which, given the extremely addictive nature of alcohol predictably led to a desire to quit drinking, but no real plan/ability to do so.

    So I saw a therapist a few times, and she put me on to the idea of mindfulness. Being mindful, is sometimes just being aware of your own autopilot and then, turning it off. The idea that "wanting doesn't not always = liking" is kind of (in my experience) a bedrock of mindfulness. That idea, along with the alcohol experiment, and reading Alcohol Explained by William Porter and This Naked Mind by Annie Grace helped me (along with some emailed encouragement from Joe.) to quit drinking, lose nearly 20 pounds and get back to the gym 2-3 times a week. Like @Kyjobe I wasn't fat, just sloppy and feeling gross.

    I'm 34 and quit drinking March 1 of this year, I'm probably in about the same shape I was in 10 years ago. I certainly wish I'd started this journey earlier, but I'm glad I got in the race at all. If dumb old me can get off the path of least resistance (autopilot) with my eating and drinking, anyone can do the same with whatever is holding them back from their maximum happiness.

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    Super Moderator DocDave's Avatar
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    I was in a similar situation too. I found myself habitually getting home from work, cracking a beer, and sitting in front of the TV. The desire for a beer became so much that I would be in a workout (spin class to be exact) thinking of how good the beer was going to taste when I was done. Plus there is the group of guys I run with. Great great group of friends. But after each run we'd sit down and have a beer or three.

    Finally I just said enough.

    I don't know if I would call it mindfulness, but I decided I'd had enough. The beer was going straight to my gut and I was drinking out of habit, not because the drinking was bringing my any joy. So with the help of a friend I stopped. We supported each other through the cravings, checking in to make sure things we're going ok.

    I didn't give up beer completely. This summer I'd have one or two while sitting on the patio, or on holidays. But during the week? Nope. I am now much more thoughtful about where and when I drink. I feel my health has improved, although after a summer of drinking beer, I need to get back on the wagon.

    Paying attention to what you're doing in life, be it drinking or buying clothes or heading out on dates with a new partner, is important. Understand what you're doing what you do, as opposed to just doing it. At least that's my take. Cheers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyjobe View Post
    I little over a year ago, I was in a similar spot to Joe. I was commonly drinking and eating too much. My physical appearance wasn't what anyone would call overweight, but I was feeling sloppy. Unlike Joe, I hadn't gone to the gym much at all so I was also feeling pretty weak. I made a decision to commit to simply going to the gym twice a week, and tracking all of my calories each day (I used MyFitnessPal). Simply by tracking calories and being aware of where I'm overeating and drinking really helped to get me back on track. I definitely still had cravings, and I wouldn't deny myself completely. I would simply just maybe have one drink in a spot where I'd typically have 3 or 4, or 1 slice of pizza when I'd typically eat the whole damn pie. Eventually, I didn't even crave the unhealthy stuff anymore, and looked forward to putting good food/fuel into my body for my workouts. I also tracked all of my workouts to help see my progress at the gym. Always trying to do more reps, or lift more weight than the previous workout.

    Now I'm looking back and over a year has passed. I'm about 10 pounds lighter, even though I've gained about 7-8 lbs of muscle.
    I enjoyed reading the article and these comments, but I worry the casual observer may misinterpret the overall message. Unless you are a full-blown over eater or alcoholic, stopping either of those altogether isn't a cure-all for being overweight or unhealthy.

    To me, the above quote from Kyjobe sums up this topic the best. Just like with most things, moderation is key. You can enjoy a few slices of pizza or a few drinks/beers each week and not necessarily suffer negative ramifications as long as you are exercising and eating healthy the rest of the time. Same goes for the opposite. You can eat better foods and never drink, but if you are spending all of your time sedentary on the couch in front of the TV then you may lose a few pounds but probably aren't going to feel all that healthier.

    I believe (and I've read some well-based articles that support this) that it's okay to enjoy the occasional vices, whether that be alcohol, food, cigars, or whatever else you're into, as long as you do so in moderation. So I would say enjoy those beers and pizza every now and then, just make sure your life doesn't revolve around them, and follow it up with a jog or workout the next day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by abh159 View Post
    I enjoyed reading the article and these comments, but I worry the casual observer may misinterpret the overall message. Unless you are a full-blown over eater or alcoholic, stopping either of those altogether isn't a cure-all for being overweight or unhealthy.
    Absolutely. Stopping cold turkey can be extremely difficult. Start off small, but commit 100%. Once you are able to cut down a little, and do it consistently, then push yourself to cut down a little more, then even more. Eventually you will see a huge difference. Sure it may take a year, but you'll be surprised at how fast that year goes by, and the sense of accomplishment you'll feel will be amazing.

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