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Thread: Advice on replacing a 20 year old work horse jacket

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by shockfinder View Post
    Since a work jacket seems acceptable to you, I love this Orvis coat. The flannel lining is really comfortable. I wear it down into the 30’s by itself and add a vest when it drops into the 20’s.
    https://www.orvis.com/p/classic-barn-coat/8R5R
    That's the kind of review I want to hear. Someone who has it and uses it. Added the Orvis to the list above for three solid choices.

    Anyone else out there?

    Thanks to all that have posted and especially the effort by @emynd for the in-depth linked list!

  2. #12
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    I had one of those Orvis coats, and they don't have any sort of fill or insulation. Shockfinder must be impervious to cold, or else he uses it with many layers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by the passenger View Post
    I had one of those Orvis coats, and they don't have any sort of fill or insulation. Shockfinder must be impervious to cold, or else he uses it with many layers.
    Shots fired!

    "Classic red plaid lines the pockets and coat"

    Well, technically, it doesn't say anything about fill or insulation. I'd like to hear more because I do like this coat but I do have two others I've whittled it down to in case the Orvis doesn't make the cut.

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    I mean, there's nothing wrong with it for what it is, but I don't think you'll get the same use from it in cold weather that you did from your old coat. I take public transit, so I am outside waiting for buses and trains in the morning. For me it was fine when it was around the upper 40s when I was leaving the house, but if it was colder I would need either another layer or a warmer coat.

    Technically, I still have it. It's in storage in my basement, very gently used. What size are you, and how do you feel about red? I'll make you a good deal.

  5. #15
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    I have this...but not much lining.
    https://huckberry.com/store/flint-an...trucker-jacket

    If you really want it to last another 20 years, I would seek feedback from anyone that owns one of these:
    https://www.filson.com/tin-cloth-sho...-fco-000000468

    Or these:
    https://www.filson.com/tin-cloth-jac...-fco-000000044


    I bought my Trucker on sale, but wish I had saved up for the second Filson listed!

  6. #16
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    I like the idea of Huckberry's Flint & Tinder coats (one linked in my original post) but to me, they just don't sell me on actual warmth and durability for being in the elements. In the car world, I think they say, "all show and no go"? Same goes for any mainstream brand name like BR, Gap, Express, etc.
    Filson is rock solid for actually being outdoors but I just can't seem to find anything that matches my requirements listed in the first post.

    Thus far I'm still in between the Patagonia Men's Iron Forge Canvas Ranch Jacket and surprisingly, the Pendleton Wolf Point Baseball Jacket. The Pendleton is no frills but it's got a metal zipper (instead of plastic) and I like the olive green. But with 0 reviews, no mention of insulation (just lined) and the higher price tag, it has me skeptical. Thus far in this shootout, I'm leaning toward the Patagonia.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Thin Man View Post
    I like the idea of Huckberry's Flint & Tinder coats (one linked in my original post) but to me, they just don't sell me on actual warmth and durability for being in the elements. In the car world, I think they say, "all show and no go"? Same goes for any mainstream brand name like BR, Gap, Express, etc.
    Filson is rock solid for actually being outdoors but I just can't seem to find anything that matches my requirements listed in the first post.

    Thus far I'm still in between the Patagonia Men's Iron Forge Canvas Ranch Jacket and surprisingly, the Pendleton Wolf Point Baseball Jacket. The Pendleton is no frills but it's got a metal zipper (instead of plastic) and I like the olive green. But with 0 reviews, no mention of insulation (just lined) and the higher price tag, it has me skeptical. Thus far in this shootout, I'm leaning toward the Patagonia.
    still in between the Patagonia Men's Iron Forge Canvas Ranch Jacket and surprisingly, the Pendleton Wolf Point Baseball Jacket. The Pendleton is no frills but it's got a metal zipper (instead of plastic) and I like the olive green. But with 0 reviews, no mention of insulation (just lined) and the higher price tag, it has me skeptical. Thus far in this shootout, I'm leaning toward the Patagonia.[/QUOTE]

    It's weird that Flint and Tinder or Huckberry can't really give you an idea of the fill material. One virtue of Patagonia is, being an outdoor outfitter, they geek out over that stuff and will definitely be able to tell you that info. I got the Roark Revival one - black nylon shell, contrasting brown corduroy on the collar - on Saturday. They don't say what the fill material is except for that it's 100% polyester. But...the pockets are lined in a plush poly-fleece (kind of looks like what they used to call "mountain pile or "sherpa pile" back in the day - a thicker, woolier looking version of the standard polartec 200 fleece that was huge when Patagonia first introduced it back in the late '80s. Can't say for sure that it's a heavier weight fleece or just a more textured version of standard weight. Roark might be able to say but even the 200 weight stuff is pretty warm when layered under a wind proof shell, which this jacket has.

    That insulating layer is sandwiched between the nylon shell and the inner lining, which is a smoother poly-wool blend fabric they call their "Nordsman" fabric, which they make a shirt jacket out of. It's a soft flannel, and between that and the poly-fleece lining I think it will be warm enough for true winter temps down below freezing. I can't test that impression at present as it is still regularly hitting the low '90s here in the DC area. It Definitely feels like it has significantly more insulation than my waxed cotton field jacket that supposedly has 40 gram poly-insulation. I'm 5'8" and 155 lbs and wear a 38 suit jacket. I got it in medium and it fits well. Looks pretty good too, at least I think so. It is a true jacket length - ends below the waist but does not cover the backside, so shorter than field jacket/barn coat length.
    “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark4 View Post
    I got the Roark Revival one - black nylon shell, contrasting brown corduroy on the collar - on Saturday.
    If this is the Roark you picked up, it really is a nice item. I like that it has some wool construction along with pockets that have snaps.
    It would be great to hear how it does for you once your area drops another 50 degrees or so. With no other reviews on the site, I'm hesitant to take the plunge but it has my attention.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Thin Man View Post
    If this is the Roark you picked up, it really is a nice item. I like that it has some wool construction along with pockets that have snaps.
    It would be great to hear how it does for you once your area drops another 50 degrees or so. With no other reviews on the site, I'm hesitant to take the plunge but it has my attention.
    Yes that is the very model I got. You have to be OK with a nylon shell exterior and the lining is only 10% wool but is flanneled and does not look synthetic-y and is very soft. The shell does have a more matte finish so it's not shiny like some nylon shells are. Maybe that description sounds like I'm running it down a little but it's really nice in person, IMO. It's what I was expecting and looking for but just want others to have a clear description. I will post about the warmth if it ever gets cold here in the DC area - the long range forecast right now is for a high of 92 on October 2nd. So...maybe I should have bought another pair of shorts for winter?
    Last edited by mark4; September 24th, 2019 at 02:20 PM.
    “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

  10. #20
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    Having enough with the speculation, I used Pendleton's handy Amazon'esque Customer Questions features to ask about the lining. I was answered in about 24 hours and got what I was after. To sum it up, the jacket has a fleece lining which is enough "for moderate insulation." So, lined, yes. Insulated, not as much as I'd like. That helps! It puts the Patagonia Iron Forge Canvas Ranch Jacket as my winner, unless someone comes out of the woodwork to toss in a left field contender?

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