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Thread: Sunglasses with good low light visibility?

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    Sunglasses with good low light visibility?

    Yeah, I know, weird request. But I hike and drive a jeep. While hiking i go through wooded and blazes of sun. Right now I just wear a hat and tilt my head because my sunglasses don't have the best visibility in the shaded time. In the Jeep, its dark int he vehicle but bright outside so I have trouble seeing the gauges some times. Some of my issues are going to be pupil dilation etc, I get that, but I am wondering if a better pair of sunglasses that use more filtering and less actual tinting would help. I am using some polarized dockers and they are just OK. I dont want to throw a ton of money but dont mind spending more than Dockers money. Any suggestions?

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    Varsity Member Shade's Avatar
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    Curious as to what Jeep you are driving. I currently drive a Wrangler Unlimited, and have driven Jeeps for the last 20 years, and have never had a dark Jeep.

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    Probably doesn't fit the Dockers pricing (unsure how much they cost) but Oakley makes Flakjackets (and other similar models) that easily allow you to change lenses. I have a pair with low light, dark, and just protective lenses. Great for the different situations, especially after I had lasik everything was so bright, I'd wear the low tint even at night to cut down the glare from headlights. They can also take a beating for the hiking etc.

    Something similar to this:
    https://www.jomashop.com/oakley-sung...918873-59.html

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    Super Moderator DocDave's Avatar
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    Maybe a pair of glasses with yellow or peach coloured lenses?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shade View Post
    Curious as to what Jeep you are driving. I currently drive a Wrangler Unlimited, and have driven Jeeps for the last 20 years, and have never had a dark Jeep.
    wrangler unlimited. I have the premium soft top and heavily tinted windows all around. Usually the windshield of a vehicle lets in enough sun but the Jeep windshields are pretty much a wall of glass so not much angle to let in light. There is definitely less light int he passenger cabin than in my explorer. Unless the top and doors are off like today. Then I have zero problems lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    Probably doesn't fit the Dockers pricing (unsure how much they cost) but Oakley makes Flakjackets (and other similar models) that easily allow you to change lenses. I have a pair with low light, dark, and just protective lenses. Great for the different situations, especially after I had lasik everything was so bright, I'd wear the low tint even at night to cut down the glare from headlights. They can also take a beating for the hiking etc.

    Something similar to this:
    https://www.jomashop.com/oakley-sung...918873-59.html
    I could spend that probably. I have considered oakley or costa. The sporting glasses have a reputation of greater visibility than fashion glasses. I just have to find a pair that has relatively thin ear pieces because I usually hike with a hat.

    Quote Originally Posted by DocDave View Post
    Maybe a pair of glasses with yellow or peach coloured lenses?
    I am thinking something like that. Or graduated brown tint so the bottom isnt so tinted.

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    Consider buying used? I picked up a set of Ray-Bans for C$35, and it's a robust market due to low shipping costs.

    Low-light conditions mean the question is more how much light gets through than the colour of the lens. You'll want to aim for 40 per cent visible light transmission (VLT); that takes the edge off but leaves enough light to let your pupils adjust themselves to optimal size.

    Your idea of graduated tints is a good one. They exist precisely because outdoor light comes from above but most of what we need to see in detail is below our eye line.

    That said, I can wear my sunglasses in an office or even reasonably lit restaurant because I chose ones which reduce glare more than block visible light. I've sometimes forgotten I'm wearing them until I try to read an LCD at an angle.

    Amber or light green lenses with polarization. The colour filters out primarily the higher frequencies (blue light) which are dominant in the bright areas of direct and reflected sunlight. This improves contrast, which is why you'll often see drivers, shooters and golfers wearing these tints. Polarization blocks glare, which again mostly occurs from the stronger sources of light and interferes with light coming off of the objects you want to see. An anti-reflective coating can help if the lens isn't tight to your face and light can bounce off the inside of the lens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galcobar View Post
    Consider buying used? I picked up a set of Ray-Bans for C$35, and it's a robust market due to low shipping costs.

    Low-light conditions mean the question is more how much light gets through than the colour of the lens. You'll want to aim for 40 per cent visible light transmission (VLT); that takes the edge off but leaves enough light to let your pupils adjust themselves to optimal size.

    Your idea of graduated tints is a good one. They exist precisely because outdoor light comes from above but most of what we need to see in detail is below our eye line.

    That said, I can wear my sunglasses in an office or even reasonably lit restaurant because I chose ones which reduce glare more than block visible light. I've sometimes forgotten I'm wearing them until I try to read an LCD at an angle.

    Amber or light green lenses with polarization. The colour filters out primarily the higher frequencies (blue light) which are dominant in the bright areas of direct and reflected sunlight. This improves contrast, which is why you'll often see drivers, shooters and golfers wearing these tints. Polarization blocks glare, which again mostly occurs from the stronger sources of light and interferes with light coming off of the objects you want to see. An anti-reflective coating can help if the lens isn't tight to your face and light can bounce off the inside of the lens.
    I think ideally I want to find graduated amber lenses that are polarized. I would do light green too though. OK, so I know my parameters. Hunt is now on I suppose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by idvsego View Post
    I think ideally I want to find graduated amber lenses that are polarized. I would do light green too though. OK, so I know my parameters. Hunt is now on I suppose.
    Go with green! I started to dislike amber lenses because it always makes it seem like it's later in the day/closer to sunset than it really is, while green is more neutral.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nandyn View Post
    Go with green! I started to dislike amber lenses because it always makes it seem like it's later in the day/closer to sunset than it really is, while green is more neutral.
    thats a good point. Plus its something different. I am always looking for little ways to break out of the standard without drastically rocking the boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nandyn View Post
    Go with green! I started to dislike amber lenses because it always makes it seem like it's later in the day/closer to sunset than it really is, while green is more neutral.
    Amber's effect on sunlight did take a bit to get used to after I replaced a green set of lenses, but it's kind of nice in my area's winter with its overcast and rainy weather. It warms up the otherwise cold (colour temperature) and dreary daylight.

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