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Thread: I'm new to shoes are leather soles slippery? What to do?

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    I'm new to shoes are leather soles slippery? What to do?

    I have always bought department my dress shoes at department stores and spent under $150. Now I am looking to buy my first nice pair of dress shoes. I am doing research and found out that real leather soles are slippery. And that you can bring them to a cobbler to put some type of a non slip coating on them.

    Are they slippery, and if so what can be done? I am asking because I commute and walk a lot, on all types of surfaces. In the past I have had shoes that I hated to wear because on certain surfaces I would slip and almost fall on my ass. I am just looking for some information. Thank you.

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    The first few times you wear them just scuff up the soles a bit on concrete the sidewalk etc. it doesn’t take long for them to start getting traction. I just avoided wearing them in the rain etc.

    If you walk a lot you may need to replace those soles quickly anyway. I always avoided leather soles for that reason. I’d burn through them in no time with my limited commute.

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    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
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    Once you scuff them up, leather soles have decent grip in normal conditions. However they can be quite slick in wet or icy conditions, which is why I tend to avoid them for my shoes (it is winter about 9 months out of the year where I live).
    Ben

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    Varsity Member Shade's Avatar
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    Like mentioned above, once they get scuffed they will gain some traction. You can also have "toppys" put on them, which I believe you were talking about in the original post. This is basically a piece of rubber, sometimes with a tread that can be applied. Lastly, you can look for a nice dress shoe with a dainite sole. Seems there are more and more options lately, as they are a popular alternative.

    Here is a decent article on some options:
    https://www.theshoesnobblog.com/2017...your-sole.html

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    As others have said, once the smooth surface is roughed up a bit the grip is reasonable. Whether you'd still find them too slippery depends on how you walk (planting each foot versus letting it slide as it lands) and if the shoe has a rubber or part-rubber heel which strikes and catches the ground with each step.

    Pretty much any cobbler can glue a thin rubber grip to the forefoot of the sole. More durable is Dainite, which some dress shoes offer as an option and some better cobblers can apply. A Daintie sole is also a textured layer that goes over the leather sole, but it's thinner and tougher than the cheaper rubber option. Neither should be an issue when it comes time to resole a welted (sewn) shoe, since the glue is applied to the part of the shoe that's replaced.

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    I like my leather soles but definitely baby them. I do love the "click, click" of them when walking in side a coffee shop.

    If you're looking into Allen Edmonds shoes, check out the V-Tread/Combination tap sole. I have these on my Walnut Strands, but the Dainite souls on my Chili McAllisters. I like the V-Tread a lot better than the Dainites. The Dainite soul makes it seem pretty bulky. I do love the Dainite on my AE boots though!

    Like everyone else said, if you have a long walk for a commute, I doubt leather would be my choice.

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    I like my leather soled shoes but I am careful where I walk. For example if it is raining out I gingerly walk along slick concrete and other such surfaces. I've had a couple instances of having to catch myself from falling.

    I've had my AE resoled by the local cobbler and he is now putting on a rubber(?) bottom to the new soles. So far, so good.

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    Which leads to the question? Why leather soles? What is the benefit? Aesthetics? Comfort? It cannot be durability.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    Which leads to the question? Why leather soles? What is the benefit? Aesthetics? Comfort? It cannot be durability.
    I am wondering the same. The more expensive shoes (better shoes) usually have leather soles, some do have a rubber heel (I assume that helps a lot?). I am buying shoes for work, so i will be walking in the streets, in the subway, on tile floors, basically all types of material.

    Why buy leather soles if they are slippery and will wear out quickly. Am I better of just buying department store shoes with a rubber sole?

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    slick surfaces like walking on hills or over pinestraw is a little scary. Had this happen at an outdoor wedding that was a pucker moment LOL.

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