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Thread: Why Are Guys So Afraid of Irons?

  1. #31
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    I HATE IRONING! I do believe it is necessary even on non-iron shirts because I haven't been able to find any the pass the test. I will say, I do believe the quality of the iron helps and it's always nice to have a steamer. By the way, did I say "I HATE IRONING"

  2. #32
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    Non-iron is both a convenience and a money-saver, when it comes to dress shirts. If I pull the shirts out at the right time it saves ironing, but as others have noted a primary benefit is that they still look good after a day's wear. Since I wear T-shirts underneath, I'm willing to wear a shirt two or even three times. Less washing, which is the biggest source of wear and tear (especially since I moved into a place with a top-loader), so I save on utilities and replacement costs.

  3. #33
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    I think it's more about me being lazy than anything else haha.

  4. #34
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    I must be a weirdo. I love ironing, and I don't iron socks, or knickers (as my Mum used to), but everything else gets ironed!
    Then there's this other way to get wrinkles out. Hang some clothes in the bathroom when you take a bath or shower and the steam will take wrinkles out. There's also little steamers now that you can use the same way - hang the clothes and point the steamer at the wrinkled areas.

    Quote Originally Posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
    IMO the type of iron you use doesn't really matter, just make sure you only fill it with distilled water. (Same with any kind of steam cleaner.) With regular tap water you are eventually going to get mineral buildup or rust in the iron that will either plug it up or transfer to your clothes, or both....
    I can only add that if you already have rust issues, then you have to let the iron heat up all the way and clean it out with white vinegar just like you do a coffee pot. But get a couple junky towels and put it on full steam and a bunch of junk will probably come out of the holes. Use filtered water for your iron and the white shirt won't be ruined (it was mentioned in my rowenta manual as well).

  5. #35
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    I was just poking around the webs on the matter of what kind of water is best for steam irons and it turns out to be kind of a complex thing. There really is no ideal water. They've all got problems so it becomes about choosing the lesser evil.

    Distilled water would seem to be the slam dunk since it has no dissolved minerals to cause scale buildup. The problem is it's slightly acidic and therefore can corrode the internal metal parts. Tap water isn't corrosive but does contain dissolved minerals and so will cause scale buildup. Filtered water is sediment free but has the same dissolved minerals as tap water and likewise will cause scale buildup.

    The old conventional wisdom with irons was to use distilled water, but the iron manufacturers have changed course in recent years and many now advise using either tap water or a mixture of tap and distilled water. Their calculation seems to be that scale buildup is less damaging than corrosion. Plus the scale can be kept at bay through regular cleanings with an acid solution like vinegar or citric acid (which is what's in most commercial steam iron cleaners).

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slubby Linen View Post
    The problem is it's slightly acidic and therefore can corrode the internal metal parts.
    Sunbeam disagrees for their products if the water is hard

    https://www.sunbeam.com/service-and-...faq-Q-A-2.html

    Rowenta says not to with their irons

    Panasonic says to use distilled water if you tap water is hard.

    Electrolux says use 50/50 tap/distilled.

    Phillips says to use distilled water to prolong life

    I'm confused now. The manual for my steam iron says to use distilled water. Is that correct? Are certain types of irons designed for this?

  7. #37
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    I use tap water and clean it periodically but dont have excessively hard water.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianr View Post
    Sunbeam disagrees for their products if the water is hard

    https://www.sunbeam.com/service-and-...faq-Q-A-2.html

    Rowenta says not to with their irons

    Panasonic says to use distilled water if you tap water is hard.

    Electrolux says use 50/50 tap/distilled.

    Phillips says to use distilled water to prolong life

    I'm confused now. The manual for my steam iron says to use distilled water. Is that correct? Are certain types of irons designed for this?
    This was touched on in at least one of the search results I saw. They said some irons had internal metal parts designed to withstand the acidity of distilled water. Assuming that's true, and if your iron is made that way, then it's probably best to follow the manual and use distilled. This would definitely be the best for minimizing scale buildup.

    BTW, the acidity thing with distilled water is kind of interesting. Distilled water actually has neutral acidity immediately after it's distilled but becomes slightly acidic within a few hours of being exposed to the air. That's because it absorbs carbon dioxide from the air which forms carbonic acid. Under standard conditions the pH drops from 7.0 (neutral) to about 5.8 (slightly acidic).

    https://sciencing.com/distilled-wate...e-7625413.html

  9. #39
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    The other issue is that people conflate acidity with corrosion. Bases, which are at the opposite end of the pH scale from acids, are also corrosive. Pure water is neither an acid nor a base (or is both), but is highly reactive. Metaphorically, there is only so much room in water to absorb metal to create a solution, and impure water already has some of that room taken up, so the water's ability to dissolve the metal in your iron is reduced.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galcobar View Post
    The other issue is that people conflate acidity with corrosion. Bases, which are at the opposite end of the pH scale from acids, are also corrosive. Pure water is neither an acid nor a base (or is both), but is highly reactive. Metaphorically, there is only so much room in water to absorb metal to create a solution, and impure water already has some of that room taken up, so the water's ability to dissolve the metal in your iron is reduced.
    Okay, so you're saying that distilled water is corrosive even before it becomes acidic from absorbing carbon dioxide from the air. That's an interesting point. I wonder how the corrosiveness of pure water compares to that of water that has become acidic from absorbing carbon dioxide.

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