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Thread: Shawl collared cardigan with a tie.

  1. #11
    Varsity Member mebejoseph's Avatar
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    I've seen photos where it looks good. But I can't recall ever seeing it in person.

    But I don't hate square-toed shoes either. So, take it for what it's worth.
    Intentionally overdressed for almost every occasion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shade View Post
    Yeah, that is what I was originally going to do. I figured I'd lose the jacket and just do a shawl cardigan for comfort, but I can always just take the jacket off when I am seated. I was just curious as to what others thought of the shawl with tie look. I googled images and some of the looks werent too bad.
    It's not a bad look though I would prefer the V-neck sweater under a jacket. Nothing wrong with taking it up a notch.

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    https://i.pinimg.com/236x/04/97/9f/0...l-oconnell.jpg

    I think it can be done.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    If you need to dress up, sweater under a sportcoat would be a nice look. If you don't, cardigan+tie is a fine option. I wear it to work sometimes, as jacket and tie is way above the dress level of everyone else in the office.

  5. #15
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    I have a very hard time ever endorsing a tie without a suit. It's a very confused look--ties are at the highest level of formality, yet the rest of the outfit isn't formal to match. I think it can either look a little too try-hard/clumsy about 90% of the time. I've only seen it look acceptable in an academia context, but I think the assumption there is that academics are a bit goofy themselves, so it fits the bill.

    Luckily, I would lump a medical conference into "academia," broadly defined. But if this is also the kind of conference where you'll see attendees from the business side of biotech and pharmaceuticals, I would expect them to dress a bit more sporty (suits and no ties, or even finance bro-esque vests and quarter zips).

    Long story short, it's a hard look to pull off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lax101 View Post
    ties are at the highest level of formality
    Wait... what?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by whereismurder View Post
    Wait... what?
    I stick by what I said. I don't think you should wear a tie without a suit, and a suit and tie is as formal as it gets in terms of dress code, except for black tie, which is just a specific kind of suit (i.e., a tux) with a specific kind of tie (i.e., a black bowtie).

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    I have done it, and I think with the right combination, it can look great. I would probably choose a more textured tie such as a silk knit, and a button down shirt. If you go this route, please share a picture!

    I also disagree that ties are at the highest level of formality, even if we disregard black/white tie. The formality of clothing depends a lot on cut, texture, and color. For instance, I would have a hard time considering something like a textured tweed sport coat worn with a knit tie to be at the "highest level of formality."

    I really like this article from Permanent Style describing one possible scale of formality. What I like about it is that he describes how each example could be altered to be a little more or less formal within the categories, and that there may actually be overlap between categories. The presence and type of tie is certainly a major factor, but by no means the only one. It's perhaps worth noting that ties show up explicitly in the first 4 of his 7 categories, and one could argue that they might fit in the last 3 as well.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by christophe View Post
    I have done it, and I think with the right combination, it can look great. I would probably choose a more textured tie such as a silk knit, and a button down shirt.
    I'll second this. I work in a semi casual environment so I can't ever really wear a suit like I want, but I do often wear the odd paring a button down, shawl collar cardigan, and textured tie, especially during the winter months. Generally I stick to white/light blue OCBD's and a textured wool tie. I have a couple from Jcrew and the tie bar that IMO look more at home with the cardigan than they do with a more formal suit or sport coat. I would just treat the cardigan like you would a less formal jacket like a really significant tweed or a really bold pattern jacket. Generally this has suited me in knowing what tie will go shawl collar cardigan and which ones wont.

  10. #20
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    moisture wicking and insulating base layer, button up, v neck sweater, sport coat. Allows for the most adjustment by removing a small layer and will be very warm, especially if its a tweed or some other heavier sport coat.

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