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Thread: Storing Wool?

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    Varsity Member Dun's Avatar
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    Storing Wool?

    I have an amazingly warm vintage LLBean wool bomber jacket and I can never wear in SoCal. I only wear it when we visit the in-laws for the holidays. I should just leave it there, but how?

    Garment bag with a decent hangar with pockets filled with cedar blocks to keep away moths?

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    Varsity Member Shade's Avatar
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    I have a cedar hope chest. I store all of my wool jackets, blazers, pants, and sweaters in there, during their off season.

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    Varsity Member Dun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shade View Post
    I have a cedar hope chest. I store all of my wool jackets, blazers, pants, and sweaters in there, during their off season.
    Hmm I wonder if I could convince the in-laws to keep a chest if I put a cat bed on top of it?

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    Varsity Member Shade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dun View Post
    Hmm I wonder if I could convince the in-laws to keep a chest if I put a cat bed on top of it?
    lol, it's worth a shot.

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    A cat bed would be something to avoid. The clothes moth larvae feed on shed skin and the egg-laying moths are attracted by the smell of bodily fluids and skin cells. A cat bed would be a big attractant, and then the closed chest would be exactly the kind of dark, undisturbed space they and carpet beetles (which also chew on clothing) like.

    Cedarwood oil is a repellant but it's volatile, and a chest isn't going to create a tight enough seal to maintain the necessary concentration to prevent an infestation. Mothballs use a more lethal chemical, which requires a lower concentration, but then you have to deal with the smell.

    To prevent moths or beetles from feasting, wash/dry clean the clothing and place in a sealed plastic bag. Include fresh, or recently sanded cedar. This way there's nothing to attract the bugs, no way to easily get in, and the cedar oil stays at an effective concentration.

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    Varsity Member Dun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galcobar View Post

    To prevent moths or beetles from feasting, wash/dry clean the clothing and place in a sealed plastic bag. Include fresh, or recently sanded cedar. This way there's nothing to attract the bugs, no way to easily get in, and the cedar oil stays at an effective concentration.
    Do you mean just a zippered storage bag or like full on vacuum sealed?

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    A vacuum sealed bag would be better, presuming the temperatures don't fluctuate enough to cause condensation to form. Less air means less moisture; dry environments are hostile to both insects and mold. When dealing with unheated storage a breathable enclosure is better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Galcobar View Post
    A vacuum sealed bag would be better, presuming the temperatures don't fluctuate enough to cause condensation to form. Less air means less moisture; dry environments are hostile to both insects and mold. When dealing with unheated storage a breathable enclosure is better.
    How about a sealed bag plus a desiccant packet to prevent condensation?

    https://www.amazon.com/Silica-Gel-De...s+for+clothing

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    When I was looking into this, I read that lavender oil was also helpful, so I put a few drops of that on the cedarwood. It makes for a pleasant closet smell, anyway. And the bride can use the leftover oil in the tub.

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