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Thread: Can a heterosexual man wear a pair of swimtrunks like these?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by JT10000 View Post
    Perhaps I'm misunderstanding you, but I think you've got your analogy backwards.

    Being black is more akin to being gay - we're born that way. And dress all different ways.

    Dressing like a lumberjack or "banger" is more of a choice.
    Solid clarification there. My oldest son is gay. I have 2 best friends that are gay. None of them dress like they are marching in the pride parade every day...which is what I think some people expect gay people to dress like. As for the gay people saying "does this make me look gay"...it is perpetuating a stereotype. It's a similar argument to black people using the N word or women calling themselves bitches. Personally, I think its delaying the evolution of societies views but it is your choice if that's what you want to do. Being "in the club" doesn't make all of your views or actions automatically right though. Doesnt make mine right either. Thats why I typically choose to not make it a basis of decision or conversation (for the most part).

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    Quote Originally Posted by patelsd View Post
    Ignoring from the notion that your clothes may signal to others around you your sexual preference - if you're hesitant to buy the trunks, which are certainly a statement piece, odds are you won't wear them even if you do buy them.
    agreed

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    Quote Originally Posted by idvsego View Post
    As for the gay people saying "does this make me look gay"...it is perpetuating a stereotype. It's a similar argument to black people using the N word or women calling themselves bitches. Personally, I think its delaying the evolution of societies views but it is your choice if that's what you want to do. Being "in the club" doesn't make all of your views or actions automatically right though. Doesnt make mine right either. Thats why I typically choose to not make it a basis of decision or conversation (for the most part).
    I agree with you. Just because a member of a class thinks or says something doesn't mean they represent the entire class nor does it make the opinion right by default. I'm black, my dad is as well, and he says some stuff about young black men that would fit in well at Fox News. The fact that he is black, does not make his opinion more valid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mebejoseph View Post
    Okay, that sounds fun. What if somebody liked the way a pith helmet looked, but didn't want to be confused with a big-game hunter or an imperialist who oppressed indigenous people and destroyed their habitats? Would we condemn him here? How could we blame him for not wanting to be mistaken as one of those dreadful people?




    I'm trying to come up with some stuff about astronauts and pirates as well, but I'm still at the office.
    I used to love wearing a solid red grenadine tie on occasion. Now because that look has been taken over by the current White House occupant, I no longer wear that tie. Is that a similar example?

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    Quote Originally Posted by gochrisgo View Post
    I used to love wearing a solid red grenadine tie on occasion. Now because that look has been taken over by the current White House occupant, I no longer wear that tie. Is that a similar example?
    You and me both in regard to red ties. I used to wear red ties almost every day to the office. I stopped for the same reason you did.

    I also stopped wearing a cowboy hat and cowboy boots, but that was for entirely different reasons.
    WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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    I am fascinated by how what we wear connects to our identity and how it projects our power. I'm glad you asked this question and sparked some interesting discussion. It can't be all Allen Edmonds all the time, right?

    For many years, lesbian and gay people used clothing to send signals to each other - handkerchiefs in the back pocket, plaid shirts, for a while in the late 90s "Chelsea Boys" wore sleeveless t-shirts, denim shorts, and work boots - perhaps as a way to project strength and a masculine power in the face of AIDS. You might interested in this 99% Invisible podcast which talks a bit about lesbians, Scottish warriors, and plaid: https://99percentinvisible.org/episo...of-interest-2/

    To flip it a bit, I sometimes wonder what I should wear as a gay man. For years I didn't wear baseball hats, partly because I am not interested at all in sports (sometimes the stereotype fits!) and because I had a hard time finding one that fit my head. I now wear a Yankees hat, especially when I'm taking my son for long afternoons at the playground. Someones people ask me about the Yankees and I try to just nod and smile. I wear it because they are the easiest hat to come by in my size here in NYC and the navy color is versatile.

    The idea of a "midtown uniform" worn by Pata-bro-nia finance guys is another example of clothing and identity. I'm in Midtown and wearing one right now - over my Proper Cloth dress shirt, Bonobos jeans and AE boots. I think each of these things in some small way is chose to reflect who we think we are or who we'd like to be.

    I've had more than 40 years experience in being gay. In my expert eye, these do not strike me as "gay." Something about the photo realistic nature of the print feels off to me and the thickness of the navy piping. I also have noticed that fit and especially fashionable gay men (I'm neither) have moved to wearing swimming suits that have button closures -- or at least not draw strings -- and more Italian, Missoni style patterns like these or these.

    From what I see on Instagram and among my friends (some of my best friends are gay!), Mr. Turk is a leader in "gay" swimwear, and Parke & Ronen has done these for a long time too. I'd be interested to know what brand these are. One could also have a "gay voice" or a "gay face" fwiw.

    If I had the body to wear something cut like this, I'd just go for it -- straight, gay or somewhere in between. Why not, its vacation! Try something new.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by gochrisgo View Post
    I am fascinated by how what we wear connects to our identity and how it projects our power. I'm glad you asked this question and sparked some interesting discussion. It can't be all Allen Edmonds all the time, right?

    For many years, lesbian and gay people used clothing to send signals to each other - handkerchiefs in the back pocket, plaid shirts, for a while in the late 90s "Chelsea Boys" wore sleeveless t-shirts, denim shorts, and work boots - perhaps as a way to project strength and a masculine power in the face of AIDS. You might interested in this 99% Invisible podcast which talks a bit about lesbians, Scottish warriors, and plaid: https://99percentinvisible.org/episo...of-interest-2/

    To flip it a bit, I sometimes wonder what I should wear as a gay man. For years I didn't wear baseball hats, partly because I am not interested at all in sports (sometimes the stereotype fits!) and because I had a hard time finding one that fit my head. I now wear a Yankees hat, especially when I'm taking my son for long afternoons at the playground. Someones people ask me about the Yankees and I try to just nod and smile. I wear it because they are the easiest hat to come by in my size here in NYC and the navy color is versatile.

    The idea of a "midtown uniform" worn by Pata-bro-nia finance guys is another example of clothing and identity. I'm in Midtown and wearing one right now - over my Proper Cloth dress shirt, Bonobos jeans and AE boots. I think each of these things in some small way is chose to reflect who we think we are or who we'd like to be.

    I've had more than 40 years experience in being gay. In my expert eye, these do not strike me as "gay." Something about the photo realistic nature of the print feels off to me and the thickness of the navy piping. I also have noticed that fit and especially fashionable gay men (I'm neither) have moved to wearing swimming suits that have button closures -- or at least not draw strings -- and more Italian, Missoni style patterns like these or these.

    From what I see on Instagram and among my friends (some of my best friends are gay!), Mr. Turk is a leader in "gay" swimwear, and Parke & Ronen has done these for a long time too. I'd be interested to know what brand these are. One could also have a "gay voice" or a "gay face" fwiw.

    If I had the body to wear something cut like this, I'd just go for it -- straight, gay or somewhere in between. Why not, its vacation! Try something new.
    favorite post of this thread, thank you sir.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brandonlorenzen View Post
    So I was looking at this pair of swim trunks that I personally think are very stylish. However, they are really short and I am worried they might convey to others around me that I am homosexual. I know some of you will be trying to tell me, "Don't worry about what other people think, just wear them if you like them." Thank you, but that's not what I'm trying to get at. If you saw a man wearing swim trunks like these on the beach or something, would any of you think, "Wow those are really short, he's probably gay." If I'm being ridiculous please let me know. Thank you.
    This is what I do: I wear what a gay, a nerd, an old people, a CEO, a salesperson, a security, a poser, you-name-it would wear and 100% someone thinks I'm one of those people. I don't lose sleep over it.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by gochrisgo View Post
    I am fascinated by how what we wear connects to our identity and how it projects our power. I'm glad you asked this question and sparked some interesting discussion. It can't be all Allen Edmonds all the time, right?

    For many years, lesbian and gay people used clothing to send signals to each other - handkerchiefs in the back pocket, plaid shirts, for a while in the late 90s "Chelsea Boys" wore sleeveless t-shirts, denim shorts, and work boots - perhaps as a way to project strength and a masculine power in the face of AIDS. You might interested in this 99% Invisible podcast which talks a bit about lesbians, Scottish warriors, and plaid: https://99percentinvisible.org/episo...of-interest-2/

    To flip it a bit, I sometimes wonder what I should wear as a gay man. For years I didn't wear baseball hats, partly because I am not interested at all in sports (sometimes the stereotype fits!) and because I had a hard time finding one that fit my head. I now wear a Yankees hat, especially when I'm taking my son for long afternoons at the playground. Someones people ask me about the Yankees and I try to just nod and smile. I wear it because they are the easiest hat to come by in my size here in NYC and the navy color is versatile.

    The idea of a "midtown uniform" worn by Pata-bro-nia finance guys is another example of clothing and identity. I'm in Midtown and wearing one right now - over my Proper Cloth dress shirt, Bonobos jeans and AE boots. I think each of these things in some small way is chose to reflect who we think we are or who we'd like to be.

    I've had more than 40 years experience in being gay. In my expert eye, these do not strike me as "gay." Something about the photo realistic nature of the print feels off to me and the thickness of the navy piping. I also have noticed that fit and especially fashionable gay men (I'm neither) have moved to wearing swimming suits that have button closures -- or at least not draw strings -- and more Italian, Missoni style patterns like these or these.

    From what I see on Instagram and among my friends (some of my best friends are gay!), Mr. Turk is a leader in "gay" swimwear, and Parke & Ronen has done these for a long time too. I'd be interested to know what brand these are. One could also have a "gay voice" or a "gay face" fwiw.

    If I had the body to wear something cut like this, I'd just go for it -- straight, gay or somewhere in between. Why not, its vacation! Try something new.
    Flawless post.

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    I didn't realize snap button closures for trunks are related to sexuality at all, but I bought a pair of 6 inch, slim cut shorts with button snap closures last spring and they're such an amazing improvement over loose, billowy and bagging drawstring trunks that get all stretched out.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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