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Thread: New to Cold Weather, Need Suggestions

  1. #11
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    I was thinking about the bean boots. They seem very functional but not the most stylish to my eyes. Sperry makes an insulated duck boot that looks a bit better aesthetically. Do you guys think these would work?

    https://www.sperry.com/en/cold-bay-d...ot/32571M.html

    Most importantly, thank you for all the help so far gents, it's much appreciated!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adammn View Post
    I was thinking about the bean boots. They seem very functional but not the most stylish to my eyes. Sperry makes an insulated duck boot that looks a bit better aesthetically. Do you guys think these would work?

    https://www.sperry.com/en/cold-bay-d...ot/32571M.html

    Most importantly, thank you for all the help so far gents, it's much appreciated!
    If you're going to get a pair of duck boots I'd stick with LL Bean. They're better made and a much better value for your money. They will last a lifetime. I don't think they look as bad in person but if you really can't get over the looks there are other winter but styles.

  3. #13
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    Sounds like you will be well prepared. I'll second that layering is really the most important thing when it gets cold. It's easy to get cold hands and feet and think you just need thicker gloves and socks, when really the problem is you haven't layered enough. So make sure you have long underwear, sweaters, and that your coat fits over it all!

    If you don't have some, you might get a pair of waterproof pants. They don't need to be proper snow pants, but just something that won't soak too quickly. These will be handy for playing in the snow, shoveling your driveway, or for wearing over nicer pants if you have to walk through sleet.

    Have fun!

  4. #14
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    When I spend time in cold weather, I sure appreciate that my wife has insisted that I bring scarves, gloves, and a hat, as recommended by several people above.

    What I didn't see recommended are ear muffs. I was always glad I had them.
    Intentionally overdressed for almost every occasion.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mebejoseph View Post
    What I didn't see recommended are ear muffs. I was always glad I had them.
    I don't opt for muffs myself, because I'll either a) be wearing a cap that covers the ears already, or b) have headphones. For my cold-weather commutes, I generally wear a warm wool flatcap with a pair of over-ear headphones. Works surprisingly well.

  6. #16
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    Uniqlo heattech undershirts are your friend, and they're often on sale. You might also consider picking up one of their ultra light down vests to layer with. And don't forget scarves--nice hefty ones are terrific in cool and cold weather, can be real elements of style, and can be adjusted with the temperature. Long ones are particularly useful. Cyber Monday specials are great for scarves since they're all one size (whatever size they happen to be), and though this isn't a Uniqlo ad their $15 heattech scarves are surprisingly nice if you just want something cheap to experiment with.

  7. #17
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    Unless you're going to business school for an MBA, dress shoes are not required on college campuses these days. Maybe if you're teaching, but even then in most departments a pair of shoes - of any kind - is all that's absolutely required. My cousin teaches at Penn State (not as a graduate assistant but as a professor) and wears sneakers to class. I'm not saying that's the most stylish way to go but it's acceptable. Business schools are a little more formal so dress casual might be required or encouraged.

    I'd get a cashmere watch cap/beanie/stocking cap (mine was purchased on sale from J Crew 4 years ago and is still going strong) to keep your head and ears warm. It's a winter wear classic that never goes out of style. I grew up in Michigan and went to Michigan State for grad school and found that a good pair of hiking boots/light hikers/sneakerboots with a gore tex or other waterproof breathable membrane are much more comfortable for walking across campus than Bean boots. Plus, if you wear Bean or other duck boots all day (for instance if you're going from class to class with no opportunity to change your shoes) your feet will be swimming in sweat, as those boots do not breathe at all. Wear a pair of Smartwool or comparable merino wool socks with the hikers/light hikers, and your feet will be warm and dry enough and more comfortable (IMO) than in a pair of full rubber boots.

    The issue with nicer dress shoes is that they'll be treating the parking lots, sidewalks, and streets with rock salt and that is not kind to leather, and will stain it. You'll see salt water marks on all your shoes before long. Either wear some galoshes (lots of people like Swims) to prevent that or change from the hikers to more formal footwear when you get to the office.

    A down parka may not be required but you may wish you had one for a few weeks in the depths of winter. At MSU a down jacket or parka was pretty essential, but there would be weeks where it didn't hit 20 degrees F even for highs. Sometimes it didn't get out of the single digits for several days at a time. Pittsburgh is marginally warmer but still, it will be cold. Nothing insulates like down, and the nylon/poly shells that those coats are built of are completely wind proof and easily shed even heavy wet snow. I'm not going to tell you you need one as you won't die of hypothermia without one, but you'll probably face days when having one would be highly desirable.
    “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

  8. #18
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    Ok guys, I purchased another wool watchcap, a couple of scarves, and some thinsulate lined gloves. I already have 2 pairs of the thermal underwear but may get another.

    I will look into the uniqlo heattech undershirts. Do you guys reccomend wearing a thermal shirt too? Or just pants?

    To answer your question mark4, I will be attending physician assistant school. The official dress code is strict business casual, no sneakers, jeans, etc. I will also be attending clinical rotations where I will need to dress the same.

    I suppose I could just alternate between wearing my brogue boots, chukkas, and chelseas with galoshes to class/clinicals during the winter? That way my footwear would still be business casual. Heavy boot socks would keep my feet warm without drowning in sweat during class. The leather would be semi protected by the galoshes. Any thoughts on that idea?
    Last edited by Adammn; November 26th, 2018 at 07:23 PM.

  9. #19
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    Boot socks really just refers to length. A bigger key is material; avoid the cotton blends. Frankly, a pair of thin dress wool socks is often as warm outside, and far more comfortable once inside, but I prefer a thicker mostly wool fabric.

    Given the varied environments, layering will be your best bet. One thought on shoes from the various medical professionals I've known is that smooth leather and rubber soles are a good idea given the combination of slippery institution floors and bodily fluids.

  10. #20
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    Agree on layering. You can count me an additional fan of Uniqlo's heattech undershirts for winter... if I do a lot of walking they can get sweaty, but the material wicks it well enough and it doesn't get unpleasant. For thermal pants, though, I find the heattech doesn't work as well as the more traditional choices.

    Assuming you don't have a locker (or office), though, galoshes over footwear may not be practical in a day-to-day sense. Worth trying, I'm just not sure it'll work out.

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