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Thread: Dappered Weight Loss Club Anyone?

  1. #401
    Super Moderator DocDave's Avatar
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    After two weeks of holidays where there was a lot of food and beer consumed, and not a lot in the way of exercise, I'm up to 174.6lbs. Not impressed. I need to get back in to fitness routine and start working out again. Hopefully I can lose the 5lbs that I gained over the last two weeks.

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    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
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    Yeah I'm not sure how helpful a DNA test could really be in terms of helping you to make lifestyle changes to improve your fitness.

    If you are struggling with your weight or your fitness, odds are preeeetty good that it's not because there's some magical genetic quirk you are failing to exploit. You probably know what you need to do - eat more whole foods, eat more vegetables, eat more lean proteins, eat less processed food, eat less sugar/simple carbs, drink less alcohol, eat slightly less overall (if you're trying to lose weight), eat slightly more overall (if you're trying to gain lean mass), get more sleep, spend more time moving around. It's not that people don't know what they should do, it's more that it can be really difficult to implement these lifestyle changes. Especially given the limitations most people have on their time and energy and the fact that it's just a lot more time-efficient, convenient, and instantly gratifying to eat crappy processed foods and be sedentary than to plan, prepare, and eat healthy nourishing foods and be physically active.
    Ben

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    Quote Originally Posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
    Yeah I'm not sure how helpful a DNA test could really be in terms of helping you to make lifestyle changes to improve your fitness.

    If you are struggling with your weight or your fitness, odds are preeeetty good that it's not because there's some magical genetic quirk you are failing to exploit. You probably know what you need to do - eat more whole foods, eat more vegetables, eat more lean proteins, eat less processed food, eat less sugar/simple carbs, drink less alcohol, eat slightly less overall (if you're trying to lose weight), eat slightly more overall (if you're trying to gain lean mass), get more sleep, spend more time moving around. It's not that people don't know what they should do, it's more that it can be really difficult to implement these lifestyle changes. Especially given the limitations most people have on their time and energy and the fact that it's just a lot more time-efficient, convenient, and instantly gratifying to eat crappy processed foods and be sedentary than to plan, prepare, and eat healthy nourishing foods and be physically active.
    Not trying to sound like a dick, so my apologies if it comes off that way. I am not struggling. I am looking to refine myself from not just a fitness standpoint but a health standpoint. As you probably know most bodybuildiers, IG celebrities, etc. that look good aren't actually healthy. There is a difference. For example, putting one through a bodybuilding competition is extremely unhealthy but for aesthetics. It's basically saying I do 90-95% of things right but is there something out there to get me to 96% or greater?

    This isn't to make huge lifestyle changes but to further refine those that eat healthy but want to also look at how their body processes even healthy foods. From what I've started reading (and am no means a knowledge expert so please correct if wrong) these fitness type DNA tests can even show when your body process foods better. What your recovery rate is compared to average etc, certain foods that will work better towards your goals, if there are certain even unprocessed foods you have trouble with, digesting etc.

    I lift 6-7x a week, play hockey 1-2x a week, eat pretty clean except when I choose not to but I have a history of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and heart issues that are genetic. Anything I can further do to biohack (thanks Kris Gethin for that term) to get the most I am open to learning about. And that's why I was intrigued by the potential of these tests but wanted to learn more.

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    Varsity Member APinNC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    This isn't to make huge lifestyle changes but to further refine those that eat healthy but want to also look at how their body processes even healthy foods. From what I've started reading (and am no means a knowledge expert so please correct if wrong)
    I've been reading and researching a lot myself these days. Wired to Eat by Robb Wolf is a great book that really opened my eyes to food and how my body reacts. Now, there is some BS in the book, but definitely has helped me. A lot of times we say, "that meal just didn't agree with me," when in fact, it could be so much more than this

    Joe Rogan had a few good guests in his podcast that are worth a listen: Robb Wolf, Rhonda Patrick, and Layne Norton.
    We are here to drink beer. We are here to kill war. We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that Death will tremble to take us.” ― Charles Bukowski

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    Quote Originally Posted by APinNC View Post
    I've been reading and researching a lot myself these days. Wired to Eat by Robb Wolf is a great book that really opened my eyes to food and how my body reacts. Now, there is some BS in the book, but definitely has helped me. A lot of times we say, "that meal just didn't agree with me," when in fact, it could be so much more than this

    Joe Rogan had a few good guests in his podcast that are worth a listen: Robb Wolf, Rhonda Patrick, and Layne Norton.
    Thanks for the Rogan interviews. I heard him roughly mention it in another interview but I’ll listen to those other ones.

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    @hockeysc23 - You aren't going to outrun your genes. Also with a genetic history of what you have, I would have a cardiologist and a good PCP. Get your annual physical and also get another blood test done every 6 months. I do like the fact that you point out that super ripped people are indeed not the most healthy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBarwick View Post
    @hockeysc23 - You aren't going to outrun your genes. Also with a genetic history of what you have, I would have a cardiologist and a good PCP. Get your annual physical and also get another blood test done every 6 months. I do like the fact that you point out that super ripped people are indeed not the most healthy.
    PCP = primary care physician?

    Yeah I definitely need to upgrade there. I do the routine stuff but genetics are not on my side. Adding in the other side of the family has Alzheimer’s I’m just looking to continuously do the best I can to be around for my little guy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    PCP = primary care physician?

    Yeah I definitely need to upgrade there. I do the routine stuff but genetics are not on my side. Adding in the other side of the family has Alzheimer’s I’m just looking to continuously do the best I can to be around for my little guy.

    Yes on PCP. A genetic test might be worth it for the Alzheimer's APOE test. APOE 4 is more susceptible to alzheimer's but it doesn't mean APOE 2 and 3 could not get it. Rhonda Patrick, mentioned above, is APOE 4 and talks about what she does to monitor the potential. The thing with AD though is that it starts waaaay before the actual symptoms arise but you can't get a definitive answer until you already have it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBarwick View Post
    Yes on PCP. A genetic test might be worth it for the Alzheimer's APOE test. APOE 4 is more susceptible to alzheimer's but it doesn't mean APOE 2 and 3 could not get it. Rhonda Patrick, mentioned above, is APOE 4 and talks about what she does to monitor the potential. The thing with AD though is that it starts waaaay before the actual symptoms arise but you can't get a definitive answer until you already have it.
    Thank you for that info. I appreciate it.

  10. #410
    Varsity Member Deke's Avatar
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    I heard something the other day that resonated with me, and I thought I'd share in case it did for anyone else. Just for some context it was on a comedy podcast about reviewing chain restaurant (The Dough Boys), so it's not usually a great source of healthy eating tips. But they were talking with the guest about how they handle the craft service table and, more generally, food in the workplace. And the guest (who's name escapes me) apparently struggles some with weight, and she said something to the effect of "for people that over-eat, everything is an occasion." The idea being that indulgent/unhealthy foods are something that shouldn't be eaten regularly. I think this is something that most everyone who wants to lose weight is aware of, but it's easy for those same people to slip into bad eating habits by thinking that anytime someone brings food into work (for instance), that in and of itself is a special occasion that should be celebrated by eating some of said food.

    I know this isn't some revolutionary concept, as it essentially just boils down to the basic premise of "quit eating so much unhealthy food", but just the way it was framed up sort of clicked with me. I work in a big office and it's kind of helped me resist the free indulgent food that often finds its way into our break areas. Just figured I'd share in case it helps anyone else.

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