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Thread: Colin Kaepernick Is GQ's 2017 Citizen of the Year (and cover!)

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crims View Post
    The fact that this thread went from discussing whether the thread should be in the off-topic forum or not to thinly veiled accusations of racism within about 10 posts is precisely why many don't feel that injecting political discussion into everything is productive.
    The fact that anyone can, in November 2017, claim police brutality against black Americans is """"alleged"""" is precisely why many of us feel injecting political discussions -- and when I say political discussions, I mean discussing, recognizing, and voicing the reality that white supremacy is systemic and pervasive in the US -- is necessary.

  2. #32
    Varsity Member JT10000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crims View Post
    The fact that this thread went from discussing whether the thread should be in the off-topic forum or not to thinly veiled accusations of racism within about 10 posts is precisely why many don't feel that injecting political discussion into everything is productive.
    Here's what I'd do if someone brought up something political that I didn't want to talk/learn about (say, just for the point of discussion, sexism in the work place as it related to clothes (though I actually do care about that a bit)): Ignore it.

    I sure wouldn't jump up and say "No no no no no don't talk about it here" - that's a sign of tolerance for the problem.

    Just sayin'.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by JT10000 View Post
    (I'm replying mainly to Greyone) Being able to view clothes as "apolitical" - disconnected from social and political issues of the day - is an example of privilege in action. And it's sad/scary that beyond that privilege, you somehow find it disturbing or annoying for others to talk about the intersection of clothes and social issues, and HAVE to jump up and tell them to go away and talk about it out of your line of sight. Wow.

    Oh, and also jump up and tell him what he should do with his life.

    But anyway, him making people mad at him is actually a good thing in some ways. I mean, when I see people jump up and get mad at someone protesting racism it's a good sign that they're, at best, very tolerant of racism. So that's a bonus.
    I'm pretty neutral on this discussion occurring on this site, but like Greyone I fail to see how clothes are inherently political. I'm open to your interpretation however, if you'd like to share it. Those against this discussion happening on this site have a good point though, most come to this site to talk about clothes & not politics, but I suppose that goes back to whether you think the two are connected.

    Regarding people being angry at Colin, I think it's important to identify that his main opposition holds that A) by not standing he is disrespecting the armed forces & nation as a whole B) racism is not present in the US in the capacity that he claims. Because of these points, they believe he is not justified in disrespecting the armed forces & nation in the way that he is. I would be more careful in painting the label racism over people with such broad strokes. In protesting a racist system, I think it would be more productive to build an irrefutable level of evidence and present concrete steps towards eliminating the racist elements of the system. I think this approach would be more productive than painting a system broadly as racist, as well as those who disagree (regardless of whether or not they are truly racist, which some are), because that alienates opposition and provides minimal if any solutions. I would like to clarify that I think we should label racists and racism where it is, but I think that requires more care than is currently being taken into account. Hopefully my points were clearly stated, I would be happy to clarify if anything is unclear.

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    Varsity Member JT10000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pelennor View Post
    I would be more careful in painting the label racism over people with such broad strokes.
    I think we are far too tolerant of tolerance for racism and it should be called out much much more than it is. I HAVE to think about race often, because I swim in it. I don't have the luxury of "not seeing race" like some people do. If you don't experience it in a negative way, it's easy to say "hey, you're overreacting." As an example, I don't experience much sexism that hurts me, but I sure try to listen when women complain about it, and not tell them they're overreacting or seeing it in too many places.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelennor View Post
    In protesting a racist system, I think it would be more productive to build an irrefutable level of evidence .
    This is the standard that makes almost nothing racist. You seriously think that's the standard we should use in calling someone or something racist? Wow.

    In any case, I think you should check out the Peggy McIntosh's writing if you have not already:
    https://nationalseedproject.org/whit...sible-knapsack

    And also look at critiques of the civil rights movement in the US in the 1960s - that it was too divisive, pushing for too much, pointing to racism where it was not, not expressing itself properly:
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.2094a39c50c0

    "A review of polling data from the 1960s paints a picture of an America in which the majority of people felt such protest actions would hurt, not help, African Americans’ fight for equality."

    "That same poll found that 57 percent of Americans felt the “Freedom buses,” sit-ins at lunch counters and “other demonstrations” by African Americans would hurt their chances of being integrated in the South. Just 28 percent of Americans said these actions would help."

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    In contemporary academic works on the subject, leadership is considered to be created by and a product of communication, with communications being both transmission and meaning. Kaepernick isn't a boss or a politician. Many would rather dismiss Kaepernick as uninformed or "just an athlete." But, Colin K took what influence he had, opened the door to leadership communications through controversial acts, and followed up on this with intentional, publicized philanthropy to lead discourse.

    Clothing is a social language. Kaepernick has been one of GQ's best dressed men of the week. Employing a striking style of clothing to stand out is part of Kaepernick's strategy; he freely admits it.

    I think Colin K is a fine choice of GQ citizen of the year. He checks all the boxes and then some, does he not?

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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