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Thread: Input Needed: Staffing Attire for Business

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    Input Needed: Staffing Attire for Business

    All, I'm working on a business plan for opening a fitness gym. I am still in the concept phase but one thing I was discussing with my wife last night was what attire should be required for staff. I thought what better group to get some ideas from the dappered group.

    Most fitness places tend to go either full gym apparel (t-shirts, gym shorts etc.) or this weird business casual with the "performance" polo shirts with chinos where the staff looks uncomfortable. I believe staff should be easily identifiable in wardrobe, standard in terms of being professional in dress (no cut off sleeves, etc.), but easy to work in since they will be moving weight, spotting clients etc.. I personally detest athletic polos for most to wear in a corporate environment but maybe this is the right avenue?

    I'm torn between:
    Company branded t-shirts (name tags) versus branded athletic polos. Or is there another option I should consider?

    And what would be the appropriate pants recommendation for each?

    What would you expect to be professional attire in this business?

    Thank you in advance

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    Varsity Member armedferret's Avatar
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    I'd go performance-fabric (i.e. underarmour, but no sense paying for the brand name when lots of others are out there for a lot less) polos with athletic pants. Comfy, yet professional image projected. If they're leading aerobic/spin classes, then I'd say allow leeway as is needed (shorts, lighter shirts, etc).

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    Quote Originally Posted by armedferret View Post
    I'd go performance-fabric (i.e. underarmour, but no sense paying for the brand name when lots of others are out there for a lot less) polos with athletic pants. Comfy, yet professional image projected. If they're leading aerobic/spin classes, then I'd say allow leeway as is needed (shorts, lighter shirts, etc).
    Thanks for the thoughts. What would you consider athletic pants? I get stumped here. The athletic pants I wear to the gym are usually sweat pants (not joggers, like old school or my old hockey warm-ups). Yes actual class leaders would be to class leaders discretion. I was thinking more staff walking around, interacting with customers, etc.

    Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeysc23 View Post
    Thanks for the thoughts. What would you consider athletic pants? I get stumped here. The athletic pants I wear to the gym are usually sweat pants (not joggers, like old school or my old hockey warm-ups). Yes actual class leaders would be to class leaders discretion. I was thinking more staff walking around, interacting with customers, etc.

    Thank you.
    I think of athletic pants being pants you'd use for cold weather running or playing of sportsball game of your choice - think Nike or Adidas or some other brand's performance fabric running or warmup pants - the kinds of things a soccer team would wear warming up, or at practice on a cold day. Not old school sweats or joggers, and not skin tight tights, but with some stretch and cut for mobility so the staff looks ready to participate in the workout, even if they never do.

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    Super Moderator hornsup84's Avatar
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    I think that allowing them to choose between athletic shorts and athletic pants (out of pre-selected choices) is a good way to go. I'd keep them to something relatively basic -- a black or navy, for example, so that they aren't distracting or abrasive (e.g., bright colors). In terms of pants, "soccer warmup" style pants (at least that's what I call them) seem to be a nice medium between 'fashun' joggers and old-school sweats. Trim look without being tights, but still flexible and breathable. Plenty of brands (UA, nike, adidas, etc.) make these types of pants now, so shouldn't be excessive in price for them to have to buy.

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    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
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    At my gym, trainers wear “nice” athletic clothes (athleisure-ish) while other staff wear regular business casual type clothes. All wear pinned name tags. IMO there’s no reason for regular staff to wear athletic clothes if realistically all they are doing is folding towels and greeting gym members. It’s not that hard to occasionally rerack weights in chinos.
    Ben

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    Thank you all for the input. Didn't even think of the soccer type warmups.

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    You may want to start with a dress code based on color and work with the employees on what they prefer for uniforms. This would allow the employees to take ownership of the task (i.e. make it so you don't have to decide).

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by ianr View Post
    You may want to start with a dress code based on color and work with the employees on what they prefer for uniforms. This would allow the employees to take ownership of the task (i.e. make it so you don't have to decide).

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
    Noted, but at least with my parents businesses when you gave very general dress codes there was always one or two people that would violate it or take it in a direction you didn't attend. Last thing I'd want to worry about is dealing with employees dress when it can be mitigated.

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