Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Smart home?

  1. #1
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Northeastern USA
    Posts
    235
    Mentioned
    28 Post(s)
    Quoted
    72 Post(s)

    Smart home?

    So I own a single-family home that was originally built in the early 90's. I want to start to automate it a little bit. Thermostats I can control remotely, lights/outlets that I can control remotely and put on timer (interior and exterior) and possibly remote lock/unlocking of doors.

    Does anyone have a good resource/recommendation to figure this out? Ideally I would be able to control all of this from a single app, and not have an app for each item. I want to make sure I don't limit myself for future expansion, if we want more smart stuff, as well.

  2. #2
    Varsity Member CMAc7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Quoted
    72 Post(s)

    Smart home?

    I have been tinkering with smart home stuff for about six months now. For outlets, I like the Wemo smart plugs. For lighting, I run Phillips Hue bulbs. I also recently introduced a Logitech Harmony hub and remote to single remote control my tv, surround sound system, Roku, and blu-ray player.

    To control all of this in one app, I imported it all into Amazon Alexa, thereby enabling voice control for everything. As an example I now can say, "Alexa turn on Netflix", and it turns on the tv, turns on surround sound receiver, switches to the correct input, turns on Roku, switches Roku to Netflix app, turns off overhead lights, turns on my fireplace mood light to a 40% dim and turns on my tv backlight all at once.

    I have similar commands for blu-ray, sling tv, amazon prime, etc. You can also pause, mute, volume control, etc. via voice. I love it.

    Yonomi is another consolidation app for smart devices, but I haven't got that far.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by CMAc7; September 10th, 2017 at 07:54 PM.

  3. #3
    Varsity Member ajs116's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    185
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Quoted
    58 Post(s)
    The two platforms I'm familiar with are Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Homekit. Each provides an app or voice-enabled input to control a wide range of smart home devices from various brands. I have an Amazon Echo Dot that I really like, so I seek to buy smart home products that are compatible with Alexa (many are compatible with Alexa and Homekit). You can see what devices are compatible with Alexa and Homekit through their respective websites.

    Similar to CMAc7 above, I use Philips Hue lights and also the Logitech Harmony hub to control all my A/V stuff. I'd like to also use it for thermostat and door locks, but I live in an apartment so that wouldn't be feasible for me.

  4. #4
    Varsity Member armedferret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Sometimes TX, Sometimes MD
    Posts
    1,071
    Mentioned
    59 Post(s)
    Quoted
    345 Post(s)
    As I'm currently on orders to CYBERCOM, I refuse to give in to IOT stuff until I have *ZERO* other options.

    I actually manually disabled the telematics in both mine and my wife's cars. The bottom line is, if it's connected to the network, it *CAN* and most likely *WILL* get compromised.

  5. #5
    Varsity Member CMAc7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Quoted
    72 Post(s)
    @armedferret

    Given that literally half of US citizens had their SSN and credit cards numbers hacked from Equifax last week, the light bulbs in my lamp being compromised is the least of my concerns.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Varsity Member armedferret's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Sometimes TX, Sometimes MD
    Posts
    1,071
    Mentioned
    59 Post(s)
    Quoted
    345 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CMAc7 View Post
    @armedferret

    Given that literally half of US citizens had their SSN and credit cards numbers hacked from Equifax last week, the light bulbs in my lamp being compromised is the least of my concerns.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Remember that time China hacked OPM way before that happened? No? K then.

    That should give you MORE cause for concern, not less. As more and more of your personal info is stolen and begins floating around, criminals have the ability to target indoviduals more easily. The more you have that gets connected, the bigger/more hackable a target you become.

  7. #7
    Varsity Member CMAc7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Quoted
    72 Post(s)

    Smart home?

    Perhaps my point wasn't as fine as I had suspected. What I meant to proport was, why would someone expend time and effort hacking my lightbulb when there is no financial incentive to do so? Wouldn't accessing the financial data of millions through Target be a more worthy endeavor? Aren't I more at risk by simply buying groceries?

    Perhaps I am being obtuse, but I just don't consider my lighting usage of interest to a hacker. Door locks, perhaps. Listening to me incessantly praise my dog through Alexa, doubtful. You obviously have more of an interest or background in these matters, but I just don't think my house routine worthy of a hack.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by CMAc7; September 11th, 2017 at 09:09 PM.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator DocDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    3,087
    Mentioned
    182 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1109 Post(s)
    It isn't so much the hacking of my light bulbs that causes me concern. It is the aggregation of all of the data points to form a picture of me. Be an accurate picture or not. For example...

    - you wear a fitbit/apple watch/Garmin GPS/whatever
    - you have a smart fridge that knows what you eat and when you need more of it
    - you have a smart lock that knows when you're home and when you're not.
    - you have a car that knows where you go and how often you go there and use it.

    Now. You go to apply for life insurance for you/your kid/whatever. A few taps of the keys and...

    Well your fitbit indicates you don't move much off your couch. This is confirmed by how often you leave your house. And we know from your food purchase you order/eat nothing but sugar. And you drive everywhere. So your premiums will be XXX per year...

    Yeah, that's the part I don't like. Oh, and THIS is where the hacks will be focused on. Not messing your lights. You'll try to get the insurance companies/whatever to understand that look, I do exercise. That's why I have the fitbit. And I buy fruit and healthy items. But when the data is changed by malicious hackers (even if it is just for kicks), and not in your favour, it will be very difficult to convince anyone otherwise. Give Weapons of Math Destruction for a look at how big data and algorithms are messing with your life. This shit is real.
    Last edited by DocDave; September 12th, 2017 at 01:58 AM.

  9. #9
    Varsity Member CMAc7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    172
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Quoted
    72 Post(s)

    Smart home?

    @DocDave

    Thanks for the information and book recommendation. I'll always take the opportunity to educate myself, especially when I am not initially convinced by a premise.

    I still claim that I run a larger risk by simply buying a home, car and food (and clothes; this is Dappered after all), but am willing to be wrong about that.

    The real question is, what does the data point of me adding this book to my Amazon cart do to my algorithm?

    (Agent Smith shutters as a proverbial red pill is guaranteed on my door step within two business days.)


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by CMAc7; September 12th, 2017 at 08:58 AM.

  10. #10
    Super Moderator DocDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    3,087
    Mentioned
    182 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1109 Post(s)
    @CMAc7

    No worries re: the book recommendation. I found the book to be a great read. Then again, she (the author) kind of was already preaching to the choir.

    I think the individual data points by themselves are not an issue. So Amazon knows you bought a book about algorithms. Big deal. It is when those points are all aggregated from multiple locations/sources to form a picture of you that I don't like.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •