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Thread: Ironing Board

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    Ironing Board

    Does anyone have strong feelings (preferably positive) about their ironing board. I have a lowish-end Rowenta iron and a spray bottle which works pretty well, but my 5 year old ikea ironing board I think is not helping things.

    Is it worth upgrading? Any suggestions?

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    Varsity Member CMAc7's Avatar
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    I don't feel strongly about my large ironing board, but I would recommend spending a few bucks for a sleeve board. If you are meticulous, it will change your shirt-ironing life. I am fully able to press my sleeve pleats without getting a placket stamped into the backside.


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    If the base of the Ikea board is stable, I'd just get a new pad and cover. I inherited a 30-year-old ironing board from my mom and replaced the thin foam pad and threadbare cover with a heavy felt pad and new cotton cover. It made a world of difference for about $20 total.

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    pad matters more than board in my experience. I added a travel pad underneath my crappy one that came on it. Some clothes I would iron and you would see the pattern of the metal board. annoying.

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    Make sure it's stable, wide, and long enough.

    I can improve my ironing workflow if I get that thing to hook the iron cord up, but I haven't bothered to.

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    Varsity Member evanparker's Avatar
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    https://www.amazon.com/Household-Ess...+ironing+board

    I have this WIDE ironing board and it's just DIVINE.

    I originally got it to speed up my ironing. I have quite nearly have a closet full of all different kinds of oxfords, and they wrinkle al the time, so it is very important they get ironed.

    If you have a whole week or two's worth of ironing to do, you can whip through them a lot faster with a bigger board. bigger board= less turning the shirt around. I used to, last winter, be able to do a starched oxford in about 2:00. my Ironing has definitely lapsed this summer, but I am sure i'll get back to it when it gets a little cooler and less humid out.

    It has a hanger to hold maybe 5-10 shirts, and it has a very wide board part. The board is made out of plastic which helps keep the heat in your shirts. It is VERY sturdy, and up to having quite nearly all of my body weight on it, which helps for those starchy oxfords.

    The fiber-plastic board part dries very well, and doesn't really have a lot of spots for excess water to build up, which happens a lot with metal boards. It is a very thick and durable plastic piece, the plastic mold itself, when you turn the board over you can see that it is gusseted and supported in multiple spots by links to the frame. I thought initially that the plastic was cheezyl, but the more I owned the board, the more I understood the brilliance of the plastic. Plastic is an excellent insulator! So when you iron on a metal board, the heat gets wicked away, to some degree, by the metal on the other side, and conducted into the rest of the metal frame. This does not happen with the plastic board. It's very very efficient. In my Engineering profession, I built autoclaves and furnaces. I would say in a professional context that if you really want to get something extremely hot, like in a kiln or a furnace say, you use insulating bricks to keep the heat-zone toasty warm, trying to keep that heat from escaping.

    The height is controlled by a very nice and simple metal latch, with a few different spots on it for adjustment. No more of those crappy auto-height mechanisms to break. Structurally it's built more like a banquet table than an ironing board, with pull 1-1/4" dia steel legs.


    One of the most important things about an ironing boards is that they need to be capable of withstanding all the force pushing down on it constantly when ironing. This one has definitely proven to be up to the challenge, as it's built quite well.

    The only remote downside to this whole thing is that even though when it folds up quite flat and thin, it's still very very large. mine lives behind my living room door which is always open, but it takes up some real room. I live in a small apartment in Boston, so space is sometimes a concern, but i really wouldn't say that it is impeding my space at all.

    I would have thought a substantially better ironing board would be a whole lot more money than the standard one, but I was surprised that it was only a little bit more than a competent regular board.

    If you have a nearly all-oxford closet like me, then you may need something like this. if you have a lot of lighter business shirts or only occasionally need to do a suit pant leg, it's 100% not worth the trouble.
    Last edited by evanparker; August 11th, 2017 at 08:14 AM.

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    Varsity Member evanparker's Avatar
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    so if you compare that ratchet steel piece to the little pinching system found on most consumer grade ironing boards, you'll see there's an enormous difference in how sturdy it actually is. In my experience, having all these starched shirts that need ironing, this little wire pinching part is always the part that dies. You really can't push down on a cheap ironing board like you can a good one. It's unfortunate.

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