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Thread: formaldehyde free dress shirts

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    formaldehyde free dress shirts

    I have dress shirts from all over the spectrum (e.g. Sand Copenhagen, Canali, Charles Thyrwitt, Uniqlo, JCrew, Brooks Brothers) and my favorite shirts (surprisingly) are my medium slim fit Uniqlos. My concern is the use of formaldehyde in these wrinkle free/non iron cotton and how it gets released onto your body during wear. I try and limit the amount of chemicals going into my body on a daily basis but only recently became concerned with it in dress shirts.

    I generally steam my shirts at home since laundering contains a lot of chemicals. Does anyone recommend a brand (price is not a concern) that offers resin free shirts that are relatively easy to iron?

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    Stay away from wrinkle free fabrics if you're looking to avoid formaldehyde.
    Generally, I never put shirts into the dryer. I'll let them hang dry then iron why they're still very slightly damp. If for whatever reason I let them fully dry, I'll spray some water to free up some wrinkles first, then iron.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wooltie View Post
    I have dress shirts from all over the spectrum (e.g. Sand Copenhagen, Canali, Charles Thyrwitt, Uniqlo, JCrew, Brooks Brothers) and my favorite shirts (surprisingly) are my medium slim fit Uniqlos. My concern is the use of formaldehyde in these wrinkle free/non iron cotton and how it gets released onto your body during wear. I try and limit the amount of chemicals going into my body on a daily basis but only recently became concerned with it in dress shirts.

    I generally steam my shirts at home since laundering contains a lot of chemicals. Does anyone recommend a brand (price is not a concern) that offers resin free shirts that are relatively easy to iron?

    Sent from my SM-G928W8 using Tapatalk
    I don't know whether formaldehyde leaching into your blood stream or similar from your non-iron shirts is a realistic concern (unless it's irritating your skin, which can absolutely happen) -- but to each their own.

    If you want to stay away from formaldehyde, you have to stay away from non-iron shirts. I don't believe there's a wrinkle-free treatment process without it.

    Fabric weave, weight, and thread count make a big difference in how wrinkled a shirt gets. Your best bet is to aim for a low thread count 2-ply cotton (100 is the sweet spot) in a denser weave like an oxford or twill. Single ply shirts and thinner weaves (like poplin) will wrinkle more.

    (ETA: I don't fuck with non-iron shirts because I think they look plasticky and don't breathe well; instead I buy cotton shirts that are woven and structured to resist wrinkles OR cotton shirts that are intended to wrinkle -- e.g. seersucker -- or I buy linen shirts and embrace the wrinkles.)

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    Twillory has formaldehyde-free non-iron dress shirts, and while they make a great shirt, the non-iron aspect of their shirts is questionable at best. After a few attempts to wear them without ironing, they go to the dry cleaner for laundering with the rest of my shirts. I'd say steer clear, unless another brand has improved on the product.

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    I seen to recall Eton making wrinkle free shirts that used some sort of process where the shirt ended up 100% cotton. I don't know if they still make these though. Their shirts are somewhere around $250 each, but you did say price is no concern.

    Edit: I just did some reading and do describe their twill, broadcloth and new "mechanic stretch" shirts as being "easy-care"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spex View Post
    I seen to recall Eton making wrinkle free shirts that used some sort of process where the shirt ended up 100% cotton.
    Pretty sure that wrinkle-free shirts are considered 100% cotton (assuming they are only using cotton fibers) regardless of whether they use formaldehyde. No one sells shirts labeled "99.999998% cotton, 0.000002% formaldehyde".

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