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Thread: Tie clips and lapel pins

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    Tie clips and lapel pins

    Last year I commissioned a custom tie clip bearing the coat of arms of my paternal ancestor, which can be seen here: https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net...fa&oe=58D5C613

    Now I am considering having a matching lapel pin made, but I am wondering if it would be "too much" to wear both at the same time?

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    Quote Originally Posted by vandesc View Post
    Last year I commissioned a custom tie clip bearing the coat of arms of my paternal ancestor, which can be seen here: https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net...fa&oe=58D5C613

    Now I am considering having a matching lapel pin made, but I am wondering if it would be "too much" to wear both at the same time?
    I think wearing them together is a bit of overkill. Especially since they both feature your family coat of arms. It is a neat idea to have those made, just wear them separately. Happy holidays!

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    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
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    Yeah, one or the other, not both. With a tie clip that is actually decorated like that (and not just a simple steel clip), I would also forego any but the most basic of pocket squares (white, simple TV fold).

    A lapel pin of any kind is generally accessory overkill, IMO, unless you're a politician or associated with some kind of organization and you are wearing the pin while involved in some kind of organizational event. (I.e. just because you're a member of the Knights of Whoever doesn't mean you should go about wearing their lapel pin with a business suit whenever you feel like it.)

    When it comes to men's accessories, less is virtually always more. If you're wearing a suit, a watch, wedding ring, and tie clip and/or pocket square is about all the further you want to go.
    Ben

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    Varsity Member Alex.C's Avatar
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    I often wear a silver knot cufflink as a lapel pin. It was my grandfathers set of cufflinks, and I lost one of them years ago like a dummy. It's nice to be able to still rock the thing. That being said, I never wear a tie clip of I have the lapel "pin" on that day. I think both in your case would certainly be overkill.

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    Definitely not both. Cuff links can match, but no other two accessories should have the identical motif.

    In general, lapel pins are hard to do. I like the idea of a lapel pin, but have yet to find one that I would wear.

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    Super Moderator LesserBlackDog's Avatar
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    As an aside, and I hope this doesn't come off as rude or judgmental, but as a bit of an Anglophile/English history aficionado, I feel there can be something distinctly tacky/pretentious/inappropriate about displaying a crest or coat of arms or similar, if it's something that doesn't belong to you by right. I don't know the circumstances of you or your ancestor or your ancestor's coat of arms but if it were me, I would be rather circumspect about displaying something like that outside the home if it's not something to which you are (literally) entitled.

    I guess another way of saying that would be to say, it's cool that you had the tie pin made as a nod to your ancestor and your family history, but I wouldn't go about emblazoning that coat of arms on everything I owned as though it were my own personal symbol.
    Ben

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    Quote Originally Posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
    As an aside, and I hope this doesn't come off as rude or judgmental, but as a bit of an Anglophile/English history aficionado, I feel there can be something distinctly tacky/pretentious/inappropriate about displaying a crest or coat of arms or similar, if it's something that doesn't belong to you by right. I don't know the circumstances of you or your ancestor or your ancestor's coat of arms but if it were me, I would be rather circumspect about displaying something like that outside the home if it's not something to which you are (literally) entitled.

    I guess another way of saying that would be to say, it's cool that you had the tie pin made as a nod to your ancestor and your family history, but I wouldn't go about emblazoning that coat of arms on everything I owned as though it were my own personal symbol.
    I appreciate your concern for following proper protocol. My ancestors were not English, so English heraldry rules do not apply. These are "burgher arms". My ancestor was a wheat farmer, hence the wheat motif in the crest. It was quite common in continental Europe for arms to be passed down from fathers to sons without modification, so I am entitled to display the arms of my paternal ancestor.

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    I always wonder about these coats of arms that someone will "research" for you for a nominal fee. It seems that doing a genealogical search to determine your actual ancestry would be expensive, and not guarantee that they will uncover an existing coat of arms. (I don't know if this is the process you used or not. You might have already had some record of a coat of arms.)

    What's the likelihood that someone actually digs up my familial coat of arms vs just finding the first one for a "Park" in some big list?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpark View Post
    I always wonder about these coats of arms that someone will "research" for you for a nominal fee. It seems that doing a genealogical search to determine your actual ancestry would be expensive, and not guarantee that they will uncover an existing coat of arms. (I don't know if this is the process you used or not. You might have already had some record of a coat of arms.)

    What's the likelihood that someone actually digs up my familial coat of arms vs just finding the first one for a "Park" in some big list?
    Companies which offer to "research" for you just throw together a coat of arms using common symbols. My uncle located our ancestor's coat of arms by travelling back to the country where he was born and pouring through armorial books at the national registrar. (He was visiting the country anyway, so a side-trip to view the armorial books didn't cost anything other than his time. He had already purchased a Eurail pass.)

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    That is pretty much what I'd expect from those companies. Cool to hear that a family member actually dug yours up.

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