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Thread: The diet and exercise thread

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngusM View Post
    To be paranoid is to be so heavily influenced by anxiety and fear that a person acts irrationally. The idea of being forced into hand-to-hand combat unprepared is one likely to evoke anxiety and/or fear. The odds of being forced into hand-to-hand combat are infinitesimal. If the anxiety and fear a person feels at the prospect of being forced into hand-to-hand combat leads that person to adopt a demanding fitness regimen aimed at preparing for that remote possibility, I think that's an objectively irrational response and, therefore, paranoid and unhealthy.

    My statement was a reasonable opinion, not rudeness. If I wanted to be rude I could have, I dunno, hurled obscenities at you. As for your second point, it really just repeats the mindset I've already identified as paranoid, so I have no other response.
    If you're not trying to be rude, you probably shouldn't call people paranoid. Most people generally take offense to that. Or rather the implication of being paranoid, in this case (which is fairly easy to assume, since you were responding to his post). Does that mean that an equal or civil response requires cursing at you? No. But, if someone made the implication that could be construed that you're calling them a little unreasonably off-center, them getting annoyed with you isn't exactly hard to believe.

    Anyways, I'm not paranoid, but I train with the intent of being able to be as fit as possible in the most extreme circumstances. Why? Because there's absolutely no downside in doing so. I'm strong, I'm fast, and I'm making myself harder to injure or kill, whether I'm in a fight with a Grizzly bear, out camping (where I might get injured or lost; strength will only help me here), or just bombing a hill snowboarding. Hand-to-hand combat generally comes to mind for people who actually have or have had jobs where that's a very real possibility. When I was still active duty, and even since I've been out as a civilian, I've found myself in, or have witnessed, situations where violence has happened suddenly and unexpectedly. So it's not unreasonable for someone with that sort of life experience, knowing that it's a possibility, to use that as one of the situations that they need to prepare for.

    Most people I know who think of it as "paranoia" when wanting to be prepared for a fight have never been in a fight or in a situation where severe bodily harm from another person has been a real possibility for them. If not, good for you. I'm not going to begrudge someone thinking it's unnecessary. Just know that, if and when that ever happens, one person is going to be more prepared than the other for that situation. And again, there's absolutely no downside for training to that end. Being hard to kill in a fist fight also makes doing physical things in general much easier. You know, like opening mason jars and what not.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
    I find this is different depending on whether I've been lifting regularly or not. If I've taken a break for a few weeks (like when I was training for my 10k, or now after surgery recovery), the first day or two back at it does make me really sore, especially on the second day after the workout. But that doesn't happen once I get back in the swing of things.
    Well, if you take a break for that long, DOMS is expected...you've lost adaptation taking that long of a break. So, it's like going back to an abbreviated noob status for working out. Which is why after you re-acclimate to your regimen, you don't get sore. If it kept happening...well, you're training too hard or too often.

    Quote Originally Posted by devastitis View Post
    what does a workout consist of?
    Overtraining.

  3. #33
    Varsity Member AsianDapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by devastitis View Post
    It could just be one of the many reasons for training. There's nothing wrong with being prepared for those situations, no matter how remote the possibility of it happening is. He did come out belligerently in his next post, but I have difficulty believing that that's the one and only reason why someone would train that hard. Protecting his family is important, of course, but probably also the health/physicque benefits would also be another major reason why.




    Seems like a lot of different exercises per workout. How long does a typical workout last and what does a workout consist of?
    Not really.

    I don't practice the "monday - shoulders, tuesdays - chest" routine so on and so forth.
    I do the same set of exercises 3x a week.

    With just free weights, its your usual bench, pull ups, squat, deadlift, bicep curl, dips, military press, tricep extension, alternate lat pull, lat row, leg curl and leg extension. Most of them I just do 3 sets of 12,12 and 8 and some of them I do a 15,15 and 10 to make 40 reps in fewer sets.

    And I do it every other lunch break in the office
    5' 6" | 143 lbs | 29x30 pants | 36S jacket | 14.5 shirt | 8 shoe size

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by devastitis View Post
    It could just be one of the many reasons for training. There's nothing wrong with being prepared for those situations, no matter how remote the possibility of it happening is. He did come out belligerently in his next post, but I have difficulty believing that that's the one and only reason why someone would train that hard. Protecting his family is important, of course, but probably also the health/physicque benefits would also be another major reason why.
    That's not consistent with how the idea was presented, though. @APinNC said, "Every man should be gas station ready." I treated that statement as if it were sincere to show that it's a paranoid and unhealthy reason to work out. Unfortunately, you're probably right that it's not sincere, in which case the "Don't you wanna protect your family, bro?!" attitude is pretty clearly intended to make people feel bad and somehow less masculine for not buying into particular fitness trends/goals. That's just bullying, and I have no qualms about calling people out on it.

  5. #35
    Varsity Member AsianDapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matchbook View Post
    Jesus Christ. Ostensibly, you do more reps in a single workout than I do over the course of ~2 weeks of workouts (six actual workouts).
    LOL. Maybe i'm working out too much, i don't know.
    Or I simply maybe doing it all wrong
    5' 6" | 143 lbs | 29x30 pants | 36S jacket | 14.5 shirt | 8 shoe size

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    This thread started like a Saturday Night Live skit but has some good advice for a guy like me trying to make a lifestyle change with yoga classes and some weights, etc. Weight loss has been really nominal, though - seven pounds for almost 14 weeks of work and fairly rigorous nutrition.

    Here's the routine I've been following:

    ARMS ARMS ARMS ARMS CHEST ARMS ARMS ARMS CHEST MAYBE BACK ARMS ARMS ARMS NOT LEGS CHEST ARMS ARMS ARMS

    I am now afraid to go to the gas station without a gatling cannon mounted to my minivan to protect the family.

    ARMS ARMS ARMS

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by AsianDapper View Post
    LOL. Maybe i'm working out too much, i don't know.
    Or I simply maybe doing it all wrong
    Based on your rep/set/exercise schemes, and the fact that you're doing the exercises you mentioned in your last post, I would tell you that you're doing far too much volume...and correspondingly, probably too little weight, though I don't know your loading...you could be incredibly strong and I just don't know. I've seen stranger things...but to work through that much during a lunch break? I'm pretty confident that you'd benefit more (physically) from dropping the volume and increasing the weight.

    The downside? None of your jackets or pants are going to fit. If you're looking to shred that last five pounds of fat, look at your diet more than anything else. Hell, you could pop some diuretics and not drink some water for a day and cut five pounds of water weight and probably look shredded. Obviously, that's not long-term...but whatevs.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittiwake30 View Post
    Here's the routine I've been following:

    ARMS ARMS ARMS ARMS CHEST ARMS ARMS ARMS CHEST MAYBE BACK ARMS ARMS ARMS NOT LEGS CHEST ARMS ARMS ARMS
    Not enough arms workouts, brah.

    Also, minimal weight loss is not uncommon during a lot of newbie fitness journeys; fat loss is replaced by corresponding muscle gain. Which is what you want. If you just drop a hell of a lot of weight rapidly, you could "wreck" your metabolism and also deal with ongoing hormonal issues.

  9. #39
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    I know slow process, I feel better and clothes fit better.

    Strange thing, though - I am getting muscled on the outside of my arms ( triceps?) but not much bicep growth. Are curls the only thing that builds biceps?

    I'm just kidding about the arm workout, but I was dying watching this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BS-oRydlnCE

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matchbook View Post
    If you're not trying to be rude, you probably shouldn't call people paranoid. Most people generally take offense to that. Or rather the implication of being paranoid, in this case (which is fairly easy to assume, since you were responding to his post). Does that mean that an equal or civil response requires cursing at you? No. But, if someone made the implication that could be construed that you're calling them a little unreasonably off-center, them getting annoyed with you isn't exactly hard to believe.

    Anyways, I'm not paranoid, but I train with the intent of being able to be as fit as possible in the most extreme circumstances. Why? Because there's absolutely no downside in doing so. I'm strong, I'm fast, and I'm making myself harder to injure or kill, whether I'm in a fight with a Grizzly bear, out camping (where I might get injured or lost; strength will only help me here), or just bombing a hill snowboarding. Hand-to-hand combat generally comes to mind for people who actually have or have had jobs where that's a very real possibility. When I was still active duty, and even since I've been out as a civilian, I've found myself in, or have witnessed, situations where violence has happened suddenly and unexpectedly. So it's not unreasonable for someone with that sort of life experience, knowing that it's a possibility, to use that as one of the situations that they need to prepare for.

    Most people I know who think of it as "paranoia" when wanting to be prepared for a fight have never been in a fight or in a situation where severe bodily harm from another person has been a real possibility for them. If not, good for you. I'm not going to begrudge someone thinking it's unnecessary. Just know that, if and when that ever happens, one person is going to be more prepared than the other for that situation. And again, there's absolutely no downside for training to that end. Being hard to kill in a fist fight also makes doing physical things in general much easier. You know, like opening mason jars and what not.
    See comment below. I was being intentionally dismissive of the claim that every man should train for that possibility. I don't really mind if some people find that rude. And while I maintain that it would be irrational and paranoid for most* people to train based only on their fear of being forced into hand-to-hand combat, I honestly don't have a problem with one person doing it idiosyncratically. I do, however, have a problem with one person purporting to prescribe such paranoid behavior as the standard for masculinity.

    *It should go without saying that those who regularly find themselves in dangerous situations should train for them.
    Last edited by AngusM; May 10th, 2016 at 08:50 PM.

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