Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 46

Thread: Anyone else into vinyl?

  1. #11
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    295
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Quoted
    113 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent k View Post
    Where would one buy a record player now a days?
    Seriously?

    Any number of places. You can get pretty cheap and pretty terrible Crosley turntables at Target. These are in the $50-75 range and often come with built-in components like speakers and pre-amps. Mid-range and high-end companies like Audio-Technica, U-Turn, Pro-Ject, Music Hall, Rega, Clearaudio, Technics, Thorens, etc. are available through stereo and home-audio dealers or online. These tables can range from $200 to tens of thousands of dollars. I read something after Christmas about the crazy number of turntables and records Amazon sold this year.

    EDIT: I didn't mean for that "Seriously?" to read like a hipster burn.

  2. #12
    Varsity Member Brent k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,983
    Mentioned
    73 Post(s)
    Quoted
    379 Post(s)
    Thanks for the information. I always thought a lot of those brands were like DJ turn tables more than the home audio.

    I have wanted to buy a vintage one but figured save a couple bucks and go new instead of a vintage refurb.

  3. #13
    Super Moderator DocDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    3,701
    Mentioned
    211 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1399 Post(s)
    I haven't gone retro and gotten back in to vinyl. A few of my friends have, and they a quite enjoy it. Me, I don't really have the space to setup a record player, amp, etc. That's not to say I don't appreciate the nostalgia of it. Just isn't something that I can facilitate.

  4. #14
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    295
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Quoted
    113 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Brent k View Post
    Thanks for the information. I always thought a lot of those brands were like DJ turn tables more than the home audio.

    I have wanted to buy a vintage one but figured save a couple bucks and go new instead of a vintage refurb.
    Depends on the brand and exact model. Some definitely showcase features that would only appeal to or be necessary for DJing. Some are just designed to look like they do. These are also perfectly suitable for listening at home. Other models are more minimal and are designed for home use. It all depends on what you want/how you want it to look. The table I have is from U-Turn. It's a totally minimalist table from a company out of Boston. Pro-Ject makes the most similar style of table—the Debut Carbon—but I went with the U-Turn because they're made/assembled in the USA and have a great customer service reputation. I upgraded the features and it came in at around $400. Audiophiles would call it "entry level," but it's entry level in the audiophile category. It and the others in its class are like the Ludlow of turntables, whereas true starter level (like those Crosleys you can get at Target) would be like a suit from JCP.

    I was incredibly tempted to start looking for vintage, but I don't have a trustworthy dealer near me and I don't know enough about internal components and repairs to deal with any headaches that would come from buying on my own. It's like buying a used car.

    For me, this is the holy grail, at least of tables I could one day see myself affording: http://www.mcintoshlabs.com/us/Produ...ProductId=MT10

    It can be mine for the low, low price of $8K.

  5. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    27
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Quoted
    11 Post(s)
    This thread is quite timely for me since, instead of watching the Super Bowl yesterday, I set up my new turntable (Audio Technica LP-120 USB) and hooked it up to my Marantz receiver and Paradigm Reference Studio 20 speakers. The speakers and receiver were cast-offs from a family member who bought a Sonos wireless system. To my serious-listener-but-not-crazy-audiophile ears, it sounds pretty great.

    For me, I particularly like the ritual of listening to vinyl, having to be attentive to flipping the record, etc. It seems to encourage me to actually slow down and listen, instead of treating music as ever-present background. And used record shopping is a lot of fun. I have a modest collection of vinyl, maybe about 120 LPs. I'm looking to slowly expand it, but not to crazy proportions.

    If I heard someone's stereo set-up and it sounded a lot better than what I've got now, I might be tempted to upgrade some of the components. But my ears would need to convince my pocketbook.

  6. #16
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    295
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Quoted
    113 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dancinginyourhead View Post
    This thread is quite timely for me since, instead of watching the Super Bowl yesterday, I set up my new turntable (Audio Technica LP-120 USB) and hooked it up to my Marantz receiver and Paradigm Reference Studio 20 speakers. The speakers and receiver were cast-offs from a family member who bought a Sonos wireless system. To my serious-listener-but-not-crazy-audiophile ears, it sounds pretty great.

    For me, I particularly like the ritual of listening to vinyl, having to be attentive to flipping the record, etc. It seems to encourage me to actually slow down and listen, instead of treating music as ever-present background. And used record shopping is a lot of fun. I have a modest collection of vinyl, maybe about 120 LPs. I'm looking to slowly expand it, but not to crazy proportions.

    If I heard someone's stereo set-up and it sounded a lot better than what I've got now, I might be tempted to upgrade some of the components. But my ears would need to convince my pocketbook.
    If yours are the speakers I'm thinking of, they're pretty damn good. I'm in the same serious-listener-but-not-crazy-audiophile camp, and those would serve me very well.

    How do you like the AT-LP 120 so far? I very nearly bought one when I was shopping for an upgrade but, because of my relatively small space, opted to spend the extra $150-200 on my table rather than on speakers (for now). I've heard good things about the AT, though, and liked the sound when I test drove it. What cartridge are you using with it? Stock or are you looking to change it out?

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    27
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Quoted
    11 Post(s)
    The Paradigm speakers are rather old--I gather that Paradigm has made these same speakers in different "versions" since at least the late 1990s. That's probably when they were purchased, since I think they, and the Marantz receiver, were part of the college or early-bachelorhood system of my now-brother-in-law (if that makes sense!).
    The turntable I bought based on this review http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-turntable/. It is obviously a definite step up in quality from the plastic body Numark turntable I had when I was a broke graduate student and lived in apartments. I've kept the stock cartridge, the AT95E http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/ca...af5/index.html . Again, if I heard something with my own ears that was impressive, I could be tempted to spend some more money, but for right now I think this is more than sufficient.

  8. #18
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    295
    Mentioned
    26 Post(s)
    Quoted
    113 Post(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dancinginyourhead View Post
    The Paradigm speakers are rather old--I gather that Paradigm has made these same speakers in different "versions" since at least the late 1990s. That's probably when they were purchased, since I think they, and the Marantz receiver, were part of the college or early-bachelorhood system of my now-brother-in-law (if that makes sense!).
    The turntable I bought based on this review http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-turntable/. It is obviously a definite step up in quality from the plastic body Numark turntable I had when I was a broke graduate student and lived in apartments. I've kept the stock cartridge, the AT95E http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/ca...af5/index.html . Again, if I heard something with my own ears that was impressive, I could be tempted to spend some more money, but for right now I think this is more than sufficient.
    I read that same write-up. It actually scared me off the U-Turn for a while, but more research led me to learn that they fixed the speed issues that review mentions. It had something to do with the spindle. I was pretty split between the fwo for a while before deciding, which is why I was curious about your experience. Glad you like it.

  9. #19
    Varsity Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    298
    Mentioned
    17 Post(s)
    Quoted
    104 Post(s)
    I started a small collection a couple of years ago along w/ a lower end Audio Technica TT. As I collected more new releases as well as used copies, I upgraded to a more respectable Rega RP1. Haven't really expanded my collection recently due to a potential move but I do enjoy getting everything set up for a relaxing listening session on my HD650 and BH Crack.

  10. #20
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    27
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Quoted
    11 Post(s)
    Yeah, thus far no complaints with the Audio Technica 120 turntable. (I'm listening to Earth, Wind, and Fire's "Greatest Hits" on it right now--rest in peace to Maurice White!) I think from here on out, I am mostly going to be buying LPs instead of CDs for new releases, when they're available--often a new release doesn't come out on vinyl for some time after it's released in MP3 or CD format, which is annoying! For most things on Amazon, you can get an automatic MP3 of an album when you buy it on LP. I think that's pretty useful and convenient, because it's still great to be able to have music in portable format for the car, the gym, traveling, etc. New LPs are definitely more expensive than CDs, but I think that's partly due to CDs being sort of artificially cheap. Or, if not artificially cheap, they're the same price they were 15 years ago when I was building my collection in high school. That seems crazy to me. So if when I was 17, I could afford to buy CDs for $13, I can't really balk at spending $20-$25 bucks for LPs now that I'm not working food service for $6.75/hr. At least, that's what I'm trying to convince myself!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •