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Thread: Steel Toe (or comparable) Work Boots

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    Steel Toe (or comparable) Work Boots

    First off, I want to say I understand that work boots of this nature are, first and foremost, for safety. I know there is a possibility that some readers roll their eyes at my quest for an aesthetically pleasing boot used for out in the field. My position requires me to make job site visits where construction crews do anything from erecting multi-ton steel to framing walls. Needless to say, I'm encouraged to wear steel-toe boots while on site.
    Before this, I had only worked in an office. Therefore, this will be the first work boot purchase I make. The company is offering partial payment, and I'd like to take advantage of this situation by finding a boot that matches my love for style with my career.

    I understand that Red Wings are a good choice but wanted to hear from the dappered community. What are your thoughts?

    Thanks!

    Justin

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    Red Wings, Timberland Pro (what I've used) at the $120-$150 range and you can go up to White's boots, which are pricey but supposedly last forever. Under $100 it's hard to find anything that will last for than a year or 2.


    Quote Originally Posted by JUSTinTIME View Post
    First off, I want to say I understand that work boots of this nature are, first and foremost, for safety. I know there is a possibility that some readers roll their eyes at my quest for an aesthetically pleasing boot used for out in the field. My position requires me to make job site visits where construction crews do anything from erecting multi-ton steel to framing walls. Needless to say, I'm encouraged to wear steel-toe boots while on site.
    Before this, I had only worked in an office. Therefore, this will be the first work boot purchase I make. The company is offering partial payment, and I'd like to take advantage of this situation by finding a boot that matches my love for style with my career.

    I understand that Red Wings are a good choice but wanted to hear from the dappered community. What are your thoughts?

    Thanks!

    Justin
    Last edited by winghus; July 29th, 2015 at 02:06 AM. Reason: typo

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    Thanks for the tips winghus!
    Do you have any specific boots you'd like to recommend? I really wish that the Iron Ranger was a steel-toed boot.

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    Hear good things of thorogood, I dont own a pair.
    http://www.amazon.com/Thorogood-Amer.../dp/B00623DYVQ

    Chippewa is nice alternative as well. I have the non-steel toe version and it has held up well in the past 2 years.
    http://www.amazon.com/Chippewa-20065...pewa+steel+toe

    Vibergs are nice if you can spend the money
    http://workboot.com/products/viberg-45-x-sierra
    http://workboot.com/products/viberg-44

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    I'm in the same position as you, visit job sites as part of my job (geologist) that require me to wear steel toes.

    I have a pair of the Thorogoods and I will probably not be purchasing another pair when these wear out. They look good, but the leather is a little flimsier than I would like in a work boot and there is an issue with the right boot where it digs into my arch for some reason. Might be that QC just isn't as good as I had hoped. Thought it would break in, but never completely did. They are also HOT after a full day on your feet.

    Previously I owned a pair of Wolverine boots that wore cooler and a little more comfortably.

    If I was going to splurge on a pair of expensive work boots I would check out Danner. I have a pair of their stitch down combat boots and they are the most comfortable boots I have ever worn.

    I think you're best off finding a Boot Barn or similar store near you where you can try on a couple different pairs and see what you really like. I know you want stylish, but comfort and safety really are more important considerations when it comes to a pair of work boots.

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    Varsity Member evanparker's Avatar
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    I have some more comments. Important ones.

    SINCE THESE ARE ACTUALLY FOR WORK YOU NEED TO ASK YOUR JOBSITES SAFTEY OFFICER ABOUT WHAT CLASS THEY NEED TO BE. THIS CAN BE VERY IMPORTANT. I have seen insurance not pay out accident claims because someone was wearing wimpy boots and got run over by a forklift.

    Different boots have puncture resistant soles (good for jobsite nails), high point load ratings (good for forklifts on foot) or electrical resistance based on what your job requires.

    If you need them for work, you need this piece of information, and it is crucial to the boots, and their wearer actually doing their job correctly.

    Once you know what ones you need to buy, you can look in an informed way for the type you need. Not all steel toe boots even have steel toes, or even need to. "Steel" safety toes are frankly bothersome when a high strength industrial plastic will do the job better.

    As much as everyone on here is often focused on how their dandy casual boots look and in what artisan's boot estate were hand stitched and whatever else, for a set of safety bootthe safety thing is actually the most important thing. Look for the right ASTM F2413 or F13 ANSI Z41.1-1991 or whatever classes molded into the boot, or on the tag inside the toe. Get the right tool for the job.

    So that all said, I have some thoughts about when I bought my Chipps, which I use at work. They are pretty great. They conform to my company's safety plan and look great. My only recommendation is that the lug sole, while awesome outside on dirt or on snow, is really odd and tall indoors. I wish I had the flat sole version. I'm pretty sure they both have different safety classing.

    Thoroughgoods are great for the price, but frankly they're not made out of the SUPER BEST materials like a USA Redwing might be. But then, they're also $200 less, and so are the Chippewa's.

    I think far and away the best deal is the Chippewas. On the lower-priced models, as i mentioned before, the oiled-leather is a little less nice than a shiny leather, but if you're good about keeping them oiled and clean they will always look rad. Justin Boots definitely makes a good boot. This is why they contract to make other boots, with or without their names on them for a lot of other companies including LL bean, non-chinese made FRYES and many many more. The USA Chippewas are really the ticket too, the chinese ones are currently of poor quality.

    My Chippewas are the USA ones. Style 20081. They exceed ASTM F2413-11
    http://www.chippewaboots.com/footwea.../utility/20081
    Last edited by evanparker; July 30th, 2015 at 08:47 AM.

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    Thank you all for your comments!
    evanparker, I'll be sure to confirm with my company on what safety class they require. I'm in quite a weird position where I'm on job sites...but not actually ON the job site.
    See, I work for a Midwest construction company, doing mostly CAD work (office). However, I'm also the company drone pilot (which is nothing short of fantastic). That means I get the opportunity to visit job sites and photograph/film work being done, sites for new construction, and completed buildings.
    I get to sit/stand well away from any work being done. I don't even have to physically see the drone if need be.
    That being said, I understand that I should cover myself and make sure I have a suitable boot ready, just in case -- especially if it's on the company coin.
    Once again, thanks!

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    Varsity Member evanparker's Avatar
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    you might be suprised, I am an mechanical engineer, and I often have positions that require me to wear steel toes all the time, even in the office.

    EDIT: WHICH IS TOTALLY LAME AND I USUALLY REFUSE TO DO IT
    Last edited by evanparker; July 30th, 2015 at 09:24 AM.

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    I'll throw in another vote for the Chippewas. I had the non-steel toe pair and thought they were great, so when I needed a new pair of steeltoes for plant work, I picked them up. They've been great so far, and are super comfortable for hours and hours walking around on concrete plant floors. Very reasonable price too.

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    Varsity Member Brent k's Avatar
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    If a multi ton steel frame falls on your toe I doubt a steel toe will do anything.

    I wouldn't go with an iron ranger or any cork flat sole. You want lugs for traction!

    Red wing and timberland both make great true workboots. Look through the catalog and see.

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