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Thread: Pacific Northwest Attire

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    Pacific Northwest Attire

    Any Dappered men in the pacific northwest? We will possibly be moving there in a year or so. I'm wondering how the typical "Dappered" wardrobe works there? I imagine most people are wearing like Patagonia raincoats and such, and I'm not sure about shoes. I've collected a wide variety of nice leather shoes (including suede boots), but not sure how these would work in the rainy climate. I find the more temperate/cooler weather very appealing, in particular with regards to attire.

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    Varsity Member Nandyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aręte View Post
    Any Dappered men in the pacific northwest? We will possibly be moving there in a year or so. I'm wondering how the typical "Dappered" wardrobe works there? I imagine most people are wearing like Patagonia raincoats and such, and I'm not sure about shoes. I've collected a wide variety of nice leather shoes (including suede boots), but not sure how these would work in the rainy climate. I find the more temperate/cooler weather very appealing, in particular with regards to attire.
    It really depends on where you work/industry. But the tech sector in Seattle is very much casual with Patagonia, North Face, Arc'teryx, etc being quite normal. Jeans and a button up is dressing up. Have a couple software engineer friends and have visited their workplaces before and it's all dressed down. I think finance or law people still dress up.

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    I'll echo what Nandyn has seen - in Portland, it's very casual, even in my workplace which spans lots of areas (tech, clinical, executive). I am known around the office as the guy who dresses well (I typically wear wool pants and a dress shirt, hardly suit and tie).

    As far as shoes go, I have a mix of leather-soled dress shoes that get wear when it's dry, so summer/fall, and then Dainite-soled shoes that serve duty in winter/spring, when it's wet. Rain jackets are a must, and it's actually worth spending a bit of money on one that won't get soaked through if you do get caught in a heavier shower. Most of the time, though, the rain is more drizzle/light rain - I moved from the midwest, so my experience with rain there was much heavier and less frequent.

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    I personally think a nice thing about cities in Oregon and Washington is nobody seems surprised or cares that you wore whatever it is that you wore. Except if you use an umbrella... I've had dirty looks before in the PNW for using an umbrella.

    Edit: I would add that the same dirty looks do not go for overshoes. I had a few random, very positive comments for wearing leather shoes with overshoes in the drizzle. Like "those are cool, where do I buy those?" type comments as opposed to "oh _that's_ cool" type you-look-weird comments. And, it may have been both you-look-weird and I-want-those comments, simultaneously.
    Last edited by ianr; August 31st, 2019 at 11:02 PM.

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    Varsity Member Nandyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianr View Post
    I personally think a nice thing about cities in Oregon and Washington is nobody seems surprised or cares that you wore whatever it is that you wore. Except if you use an umbrella... I've had dirty looks before in the PNW for using an umbrella.

    Edit: I would add that the same dirty looks do not go for overshoes. I had a few random, very positive comments for wearing leather shoes with overshoes in the drizzle. Like "those are cool, where do I buy those?" type comments as opposed to "oh _that's_ cool" type you-look-weird comments. And, it may have been both you-look-weird and I-want-those comments, simultaneously.
    Seattle-ite born and raised, and I use umbrellas all the time (as well as rain jackets). I used to go with only a rain jacket, but got tired of having wet crotch/thighs from the raining dripping down the front of jacket/walking in the rain. I don't think I've ever received any dirty looks for using one, and if I did, I could just twirl the umbrella a bit to fling some droplets into their eyes and give them a reason to give me the stink eye :P

    @Aręte as I mentioned earlier about how casual it is here, it really, really is casual. Just had an interview today at a biotech and I went business casual (my WIWT post )and a suit would've been overkill (maybe sales or marketing might be a different story, dunno).
    Last edited by Nandyn; September 7th, 2019 at 01:16 AM.

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    Umbrella etiquette is a concern, however. Using a golf umbrella in the city will rightly earn some looks, as it takes up the entire sidewalk. If you have an umbrella, don't walk under the overhangs; let people without an umbrella use that shelter. Pay attention to other pedestrians and be prepared to tilt or (if you're taller) lift your umbrella as you approach them. Fold and shake the umbrella away from the door, so you're not impeding foot traffic or soaking passersby. And if your umbrella is still dripping when you come inside, do avoid creating puddles where people walk.

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    Varsity Member Nandyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Galcobar View Post
    Umbrella etiquette is a concern, however. Using a golf umbrella in the city will rightly earn some looks, as it takes up the entire sidewalk. If you have an umbrella, don't walk under the overhangs; let people without an umbrella use that shelter. Pay attention to other pedestrians and be prepared to tilt or (if you're taller) lift your umbrella as you approach them. Fold and shake the umbrella away from the door, so you're not impeding foot traffic or soaking passersby. And if your umbrella is still dripping when you come inside, do avoid creating puddles where people walk.
    Oh definitely that. I don't think I've actually seen anybody use a golf umbrella out and about. I love umbrella etiquette in Vancouver, BC. Everybody leaves their umbrellas either outside the door or just inside, and many stores provide umbrella stands or bags for customers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nandyn View Post
    Oh definitely that. I don't think I've actually seen anybody use a golf umbrella out and about. I love umbrella etiquette in Vancouver, BC. Everybody leaves their umbrellas either outside the door or just inside, and many stores provide umbrella stands or bags for customers.
    Canada has retained more "Britishness" than the United States so I'm not surprised their umbrella etiquette is better. Umbrellas are practically a religion in the UK. I worked with a Brit for a couple of years and he was never without his umbrella in Washington, DC. Even on a beautiful sunny summer day with no rain predicted, his cane handled stick umbrella went everywhere with him.
    “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

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    Varsity Member Nandyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark4 View Post
    Canada has retained more "Britishness" than the United States so I'm not surprised their umbrella etiquette is better. Umbrellas are practically a religion in the UK. I worked with a Brit for a couple of years and he was never without his umbrella in Washington, DC. Even on a beautiful sunny summer day with no rain predicted, his cane handled stick umbrella went everywhere with him.
    Probably concealed a sword and a small caliber pistol and a ricin pellet injector in the tip.

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