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Thread: "Breaking Up Is Not So hard to Do" Article - Separating a Suit

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    "Breaking Up Is Not So hard to Do" Article - Separating a Suit

    I was reading this article yesterday, http://www.blacklapel.com/thecompass...es-suit-pants/, which discusses if and how to break up a suit. There are many opinions on the matter, ranging from never to whenever. As I fall firmly between the two, am fundamentally frugal and looking for a Navy sport coat, I am debating getting a navy suit to break up. My vision is to mix and match my navy suit with my grey suit. Will people know? Maybe. Would I care? Probably not. I respect rules, but I don't follow them blindly, especially when then don't make sense to me. (And I included "to me" because I readily understand that others will have different viewpoints.)

    If it helps, my daily dress is business casual. Most wear dress pants or Khakis/Chinos and a button up or collared shirt. It is a less formal business casual environment than many. I may be one of 5 people who wear a sport coat on any given day. I use the suits mainly on business trips a few times a year. Using the suits as interchangeable parts would allow me to get more use out of them.

    Now, why does this make sense or why doesn't it?

    Thanks!

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    I have tried and failed with my suit (I rarely need it) and I think that came mostly down to the fabric. It's hard to dress down a worsted blue suit, easier with a pattern or a fabric with more texture. I don't get much wear out of worsted sportcoats either so I think a suit in a more casual fabric would work. My plan for my next MTM purchase is a light grey suit in a fabric with more texture for just this situation.

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    The thing that stops me is that my suit jackets have those features that make them look like suit jackets, e.g., the flap pockets. They're slim enough, and possibly even short enough, but otherwise the other features give the jackets away too easily as suit jackets.

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    I agree with everything that's been said. Especially with navy I think the fabric always looks sleeker and finer on a suit than the fabrics that are used for sport coat. Add to that the details that make a suit jacket more formal and pairing it with anything other than the pants that it's made to go with makes the jacket look odd and out of place. There are so many websites out there where you can find heavily discounted navy jackets that would look much better. Even with navy sport jackets I'm always concerned with having it look too country club-ish so I find it's better to get one with patch pockets and some more casual details

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    I think the Ludlow suit breaks up easily if you need it to (I personally don't because I'm a psycho and bought three of the famed Ludlow sport coats pre-gold buttons). The only thing I'd be concerned about is different levels of wear between the jacket and pants. If you don't overdo it, you'll be in the green.

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    All good points, but I am still not convinced. Many a high end sport coat has flap pockets. Like this one: http://www.neimanmarcus.com/Brioni-W...&cmCat=product. And this one: http://shop.nordstrom.com/s/canali-s...blazer/3036466. There isn't really a difference between a sport coat and a suit coat, right? A high end, Hickey Freeman or other maker sport coat and suit coat with use the same or similar materials, cut, etc. While I respect your opinions, I am still am not convinced one cannot mixed and mingled suits.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudonihm View Post
    While I respect your opinions, I am still am not convinced one cannot mixed and mingled suits.
    Go for it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudonihm View Post
    While I respect your opinions, I am still am not convinced one cannot mixed and mingled suits.
    Go for it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudonihm View Post
    While I respect your opinions, I am still am not convinced one cannot mixed and mingled suits.
    Go for it!

    Many DO's and DONT's are just rule of thumbs. If you're an expert, you'll see gray areas more than simply black-and-white.

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    Certain suits are much better suited (ahem) to wearing as separates than others. As a general rule, the more formal the suit, the harder it will be to wear as separates. For example, you certainly wouldn't wear a tuxedo as separates. Charcoal, navy, and mid-grey suits in a refined, worsted wool are also not good for separates. A conservative business suit jacket worn without the matching trousers will never not look like an orphaned suit jacket.

    However, more informal suits can be broken into separates with greater success. A suit with a pronounced pattern, rough-textured or non-traditional fabric, or contrasting buttons makes for decent separates. For example, I own J.Crew Factory's cotton oxford suit. In my opinion, it actually wears better as separates than as a suit. The full suit borders on Colonel Sanders costume territory, but the jacket and pants can be pretty easily incorporated into a normal-looking outfit.

    If you do wear a suit broken into separates, and you also occasionally wear it as a suit, you may encounter the issue where one piece wears out significantly faster than the other. This will especially be true if you do a lot of dry-cleaning.
    Ben

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