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Thread: A Theory On Uniqlo's Prices and Issues With Their Sizing

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    Varsity Member DK's Avatar
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    A Theory On Uniqlo's Prices and Issues With Their Sizing

    I wrote a bit about Uniqlo's stores and their strange size offerings on The Peak Lapel: http://thepeaklapel.tumblr.com/post/...h-great-prices

    The long and short of it:

    "Instead of having to produce dozens of different waist and length combinations, they simply produce only one length option and only alter their waist sizes. This must cut down a ton on production costs as well as in waste. Itís a genius business move, and the savings show in the final price of the chinos ó usually right around $30-$40 before a sale. Buy the pants with a 34Ē length, and have them tailored for free. It possibly even makes the pants seem more prestigious because youíre having them tailored. Ooh. [...]

    On the one hand, I appreciate the ingenuity of making clothes like this to cut costs. But on the other hand, itís a bit of a barrier to entry. I would have bought chinos on the spot if I didnít have to wait to have them tailored. I would have purchased a few pairs of shorts if they actually fit me. I wonder if they take that into account."

    What do you all think?

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    I usually have to tailor all of my clothes to length, either in sleeves or leg, so to me it is not really a barrier to entry. The single length thing is not true of all their pants either. Uniqlo jeans come in different lengths (32 and 34, I think)

    The limited waist sizing is a bigger problem. If you can't find a pair of shorts that fit you adequately then they are losing a sale.

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    http://nymag.com/fashion/features/65898/index4.html

    “And what’s different about Uniqlo is that they have chosen fabric, rather than fashion, as the area where they want to excel.”

    "Uniqlo has sixteen takumi, or textile “masters,” on staff, none with less than twenty years’ experience. They specialize in areas like dyeing or sewing, and work with more than 70 factories, mostly in China. A typical order will be around a million units of denim, fleece, or cashmere—often all the material the supplier makes. The company further increases its buying power by offering a smaller selection of fabrics, across a more limited selection of clothes styles, than most other retailers.

    Uniqlo disguises the limited variety of products it makes by offering them in almost every color imaginable. There are, for instance, 80 colors of polo shirts currently available on the floor. Most of those colors don’t move very quickly but the wide spectrum serves as a helpful deception."

    “We have much fewer styles,” says Odake, “especially when you compare us with companies like H&M or Topshop or Zara. That’s the secret of why we can get better quality. We try to consolidate the fabric buys as much as possible. H&M sales are bigger, but we have bigger orders. We take huge quantities, and we have negotiation power."

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    @pdx: That's super interesting. Great point.

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