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Dry clean or machine wash dress shirts?

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    #16
    I usually machine wash, hang dry. Also not everytime I wear it since I wear an undershirt

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      #17
      Ive heard the cleaners are rougher than home washing argument for years. I dont believe or agree with it at all. In fact the place i go to has a page on their site that dispells the myth of this that was conducted through two Universities. http://rexcleaner.com/docs/myth.html. Even without that I also base my findings on my life experience because I could not care less about a study or a million studies if my results differed. Ive bought two of the exact same shirt, different colors, and washed one and had the other laundered for the life of the shirt. The professionally laundered shirt always looked crisp and sharp, the colors bright, and almost like new. The one I washed, per the shirts instructions couldnt even compare. You can tell a person who gets their shirts done professionally and those that dont almost 100 percent of the time. I think some people try coming up with excuses to not pay a few bucks to keep their clothes looking nice or are too lazy and cheap to run to the cleaners.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Shade View Post
        I think some people try coming up with excuses to not pay a few bucks to keep their clothes looking nice or are too lazy and cheap to run to the cleaners.
        Yes... clearly people who make different choices than you do so because they're cheap and lazy. Laundering and ironing your own clothes... talk about lazy!

        Maybe you just haven't been washing your clothes correctly. I wash all my dress shirts myself and they are all in like-new condition.

        P.S. I tried to take a look at those two "studies" to check out their methodology but was unable to do so since your drycleaner's website doesn't actually link to them. Nor do they mention the universities involved in the studies, the studies' authors, the date of the studies, or any other information that might help to identify and locate the actual studies themselves. So let's just say I find this drycleaner's claims less than credible. Especially since they assume facts not in evidence, i.e., that the garment will be washed and dried in high temps, that the garment in question will be wool (obviously not the case with dress shirts), etc.
        Ben

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          #19
          Originally posted by LesserBlackDog View Post
          Yes... clearly people who make different choices than you do so because they're cheap and lazy. Laundering and ironing your own clothes... talk about lazy!

          Maybe you just haven't been washing your clothes correctly. I wash all my dress shirts myself and they are all in like-new condition.
          It wasnt meant to be offensive. It is a fact. Some people are cheap. They think they can do things better or equal than professionals with years of experience and professional machines. The people who buy the Flow-bee because they are too cheap to pay for a proper haircut, because "they can do it just as good". It's a rubbish argument and these kind of people look for all types of "proof" on the internet to back their arguments. I know from my own personal life experience that "I" cant make a shirt looks nearly as good as the cleaners do and that most people who claim they can are full of crap. I also dont tailor my own clothes because I suck at sowing.

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            #20
            And here I thought my iron and I were friends, clearly that is not the case anymore. He's been lying to me about how my shirts look! Stupid iron!

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              #21
              Originally posted by Kroaker View Post
              I never get my shirts dry cleaned. I get them laundered at the cleaners. No starch and hung on a hanger.
              This. I have no position on which is better, but I live in an apartment building and don't have my own W/D in my unit. Given my hours at work being rather brutal, I use the drycleaner for drycleaning and laundry. A drycleaner should NOT actually be drycleaning any shirt that's brought in unless, of course, it's a dry clean only shirt. Laundering with no starch is the way to go. Yes it costs a bit of cash, but for me the $$ is worth it. Comes out clean and crisp each time, and saves me a lot of time. For others, home wash and ironing will be a better use of their time/cash. I also hate ironing, and having the room/board in my small NYC apartment is excessive, so those factor in a good bit as well.

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                #22
                oh, the irony.

                I iron when I must. I don't wear that many dress shirts though. I mainly wear casual OCBDs and such, and yet once in a while I'll still touch up a collar and that kind of thing. Life's too short to iron too much, though, unless you're in the military--I ironed quite a bit back in my USAF days unless it was a day for fatigues.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Shade
                  Actually it does. A fact in science is a general observation, that doesnt really tell you anything. Read up on the scientific method sport.
                  Oh boy, let's not go down that road here, sport. Shade, you're relatively new here (at least to posting) so I will guide you a bit. You are getting some backlash because of the tone of your posts (real or perceived). Things are congenial around these here parts. Open conversation is welcome, but inane debate is really just not worth it. This comment is directed at more than just you. Drycleaning works for some, and cleaning things at home works for others. Debating and (incorrectly) defining "fact" within the scientific method for others is generally not that helpful and not related to the clothing.

                  Back on topic, I launder at home because I feel that I do a perfectly fine job and like to not pay others for services when I do not have to. For the same reason I fix things at home when I can, etc. Just how I like to do things.
                  "You don't need money to dress better than you do" - Salvatore Romano

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                    #24
                    I wash my shirts myself in cold water on perm press cycle.

                    The dress shirts that I wear with suits are non-iron cotton. So I hang-dry them. They don't need ironing.

                    The semi-dress shirts (OCBDs), I iron myself while still moist. (All done about once a week)

                    The casual button up shirts, I usually don't iron. Take them immediately out of the drier, and it's ok to wear them a little wrinkled.

                    Paying $2 per shirt, plus gas, plus driving time and waiting time, they all add up over a lifetime. Each time you iron a shirt you become better and faster with it. Each time you send a shirt out to be cleaned, you lose money and probably wear/tear on the shirts. I have had several buttons damaged by the cleaner.

                    No one cares more about your clothes than you do. So I think I will end up taking better care of them than anyone else.

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                      #25
                      On topic: Machine wash cold, hang dry. Iron them if they need ironing (most don't bc they're CT non-irons). Can't afford to dry clean / launder them, and I need to wash them after almost every wear because I'm in the hospital and I also tend to sweat a lot. Nothing cheap about it - my shirts don't get ruined in the wash, they don't shrink, and they last for a decent length of time.
                      Last edited by greg_s; November 25, 2013, 02:05 PM.

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                        #26
                        ^ That's pretty similar to what I do, LCDR. All my clothes get washed on cold and delicate with either a gentle soap or a very small amount of detergent. I sort my laundry by light and heavy garments. That way, lightweight garments like shirts and sweaters don't get jostled against rough denim, brass rivets, etc. I dry most of my clothes on low heat; Others get hung dry (my nicest shirts) or laid flat to dry (woolens and knits). I don't actually end up needing to do much ironing since some of my dress shirts are non-iron, and I prefer my casual shirts to have a bit of lived-in rumple and not be perfectly crisp. So only a handful of my shirts ever need to be ironed.

                        I do use a dry-cleaner, but mostly to steam and press structured garments like suits and blazers. I only actually dry-clean suits, jackets, and outerwear once or twice a year.

                        If I lived in an apartment or another situation without W/D, I might do like Hornsup and get more of my things professionally laundered (not dry-cleaned). But in my living situation, it's faster and more convenient to do my own laundry than to haul everything to the cleaner all the time.
                        Ben

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Shade
                          Oh, so I am suppose to just agree with everyone on an opinion thread? Brilliant. Sorry. not a sheep. I'm giving my honest opinion on a thread asking if I think washing machine or dry cleaning.
                          Civil disagreement is fine, if you want to remain a member here. Insults, citing "science" to back up insignificant claims as facts, and generally being unhelpful/unlikeable are not fine. You are welcome here. We like members that are active, however, we are a genial group. I am giving my honest opinion to you about how you can do well here. It has nothing to do with being a sheep.
                          "You don't need money to dress better than you do" - Salvatore Romano

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                            #28
                            I never thought the day would come, but I think I'm in complete agreement with almost everyone in this thread that does their own laundry. I hereby tender my resignation as the default bad guy

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by frost View Post
                              I never thought the day would come, but I think I'm in complete agreement with almost everyone in this thread that does their own laundry. I hereby tender my resignation as the default bad guy
                              I disagree with everything you just said :P
                              "You don't need money to dress better than you do" - Salvatore Romano

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by greg_s View Post
                                I disagree with everything you just said :P
                                DoH!

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