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Large Company Business Casual Dress Code. Help!

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    #16
    Also some sneaky denim (Bonobos travel jeans) help with the frumpy khakis problem. I mix those in with some chinos, cords, and the occasional wool dress pant. Button downs pretty much everyday. Roll them sleeves up in warmer weather: cools you off and makes you look like you mean business!
    6'4" 210lbs, 40L, 15.5/35, 35x34

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      #17
      Originally posted by DXLi View Post
      At the same time, you don't want to noticeably overdress your boss unless you expect to get his job soon.
      Is that a Joke?

      My boss wears dress shirts that are too big, faded pants and black runners. This is a company of about 40,000 people worldwide and 2500 in my city.

      I wear suits and sport coats to work all the time, I don't think I've ever been written off in a meeting but I also know the entire system; Heck I was asked to go to a meeting with some lawyers when I was dressed up one day.

      If you're in a tiny little company I can see keeping it in check and not wearing an Omega watch if your boss has a timex.

      I'd say don't wear silk shirts, pointy narrow shoes and gold chains.

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        #18
        Originally posted by shad0w4life View Post
        Is that a Joke?

        My boss wears dress shirts that are too big, faded pants and black runners. This is a company of about 40,000 people worldwide and 2500 in my city.

        I wear suits and sport coats to work all the time, I don't think I've ever been written off in a meeting but I also know the entire system; Heck I was asked to go to a meeting with some lawyers when I was dressed up one day.

        If you're in a tiny little company I can see keeping it in check and not wearing an Omega watch if your boss has a timex.

        I'd say don't wear silk shirts, pointy narrow shoes and gold chains.
        This depends so much on the culture and social dynamics of any given workplace that it's hard to really give a bright line rule (oh god oh god, the lawyer in me comes out....).

        There are some workplaces where dressing better than the top folks, or simply dressing radically differently than everyone else (if, as it seems, everyone else in the businesses dresses very casually), can have a detrimental effect on the way people view you and your ability to assimilate into and mesh with the existing workplace culture. This is especially true for a brand new employee, where they don't yet know you and consequently your appearance becomes a much bigger factor in how you are judged.

        In other workplaces, this might not matter as much, or at all.

        But it's better to start the job at the level the company has indicated (business casual) and then adjust up or down depending on the culture of the workplace. Plus, there is plenty of room within "business casual" to look professional, put-together, and stylish without having to wear a suit. You can dress "better" than a manager who wears ill-fitting khakis and sneakers without having to dress "above" your position in the company's hierarchy.
        Last edited by LesserBlackDog; April 3, 2013, 11:50 AM.
        Ben

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          #19
          They say to dress for the position you would like to have not the one you have. If that were the case, I would be wearing neon hiking sneakers, tight exercise pants, a spanex jacket over a t-shirt, and a knit cap. No kidding, this is what my boss wears almost everyday to the office.

          There is so much advice out there about to dress on the job. Most of it is crap. But Joe in the Dappered site has some good advice--look through those things.

          Mainly just take some pride in your appearance and try to dress well within your means and for the context. I think in most business office contexts these days, that means a clean button-up shirt, some chinos, and some clean leather shoes (i.e., not sneakers). How you approach those basics is up to you, i.e., how expensive, how fitted, colors, other options. That is where you can express some individuality. For example, maybe you want to be the guy who wears cardigans a lot, or brings a sport coat to the office, or wears white jeans once in a while.

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            #20
            I agree for a new person, show up fairly typical dressed, button down shirt, trousers, shoes. Slowly incorporate your own style over time.

            I will add I've been at this company for 5 years so I said F this I'm not wearing wrinkled pants, crappy slip on black shoes or runners, and a moisture wicking polo, about 2 years ago. However I still dressed better than my boss up until that time so that advice I really am hesitant to say don't outdress your boss, certainly don't flaunt it.

            It could be argued that wearing a nice pair of shoes would be borderline overdressing, a great pair of shoes really dresses up any outfit and people will notice they aren't generic cheapos right away.


            If it wasn't abused so much I'd post the "Office Casual Lawyer" clip :P

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              #21
              And just because your coworkers dress badly doesn't mean you should. That's their problem. If you can step it up a little, it's your prerogative to do so.

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                #22
                Originally posted by DXLi View Post
                At the same time, you don't want to noticeably overdress your boss unless you expect to get his job soon.
                That is true too. However, I believe that you can dress for the job you want without wearing a suit everyday. Though in my office, the guys in the department I eventually want to work for do wear suits, so occasionally wearing one might not be a bad idea. My boss is a woman though, so outdressing her is a little different than outdressing a male boss.

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