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Entry level shoes that can be Resoled?

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    Entry level shoes that can be Resoled?

    So I've basically been trying to rebuild my wardrobe and learn years of style knowledge in the span of a few months and have made several mistakes already regarding shoes. Aside from making some size mistakes on CDB's, I bought Giorgio Brutini Double Monkstraps (Arbiter Model) that don't look like they can be resoled. I also own a pair of Stacy Adams that have decorative stitching, but clearly can't be resoled either. Both were ordered before learning about AE's and other higher tier brands.

    So here is my question: are there any brands under 100 bucks that are resole-able/repairable? I am always tempted to buy another Stacy Adams or Steve Madden shoe since they are all dirt cheap.

    The other option is to thrift used AE's off eBay.

    #2
    I don't have an answer to your question but I think that resoling/redrafting shoes is overrated. I wouldn't base my decision n if I can recraft a shoe 10 years down the road. Your taste could change in that time. Buy what you think looks good to you now.

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      #3
      Resoling is nice but not imperative imo. The most important thing is to make sure the leather is full grain. You can always add sole savers and replace those as needed instead of resoling like this:

      Last edited by Acousticfoodie; April 1, 2013, 12:25 AM.

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        #4
        Yes - full-grain leather will last infinitely longer than cheap leather that's often made with glue and vinyl. The difference is that a scratch can be buffed out of full-grain leather. Cheap leather, which is all over in the women's world, has this thin veneer on the outside that wears off quickly and can't be restored.

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          #5
          Also, resoling shoes is not cheap. With AE, the cost to recraft is more than what you're looking to pay upfront. If you're the kind of person who gravitates towards the latest styles, or if your style is still evolving, it's not necessarily a bad financial decision to buy shoes with glued soles.

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            #6
            Thanks for the info guys. Is there a way to tell if it is full grain? Or will I have to ask the manufacturer? Anyone have experience with cheap shoes that happen to be full grain?

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              #7
              If you're looking to save your SOUL, that's a whole different question.

              Shoe manufacturers are usually very proud when they use full grain leather and will take every opportunity to tell you. Also - the leather tends to have more natural variation than vinyl, although the synthetic process gets good at mimicking that.

              My strategy is to find the quality manufacturers through discounted means like seconds and eBay. Has worked well for me versus trying to find the discount manufacturer's unusually high quality shoe. That's like looking for a unicorn. It might be out there, but...

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                #8
                Originally posted by Zeejet View Post
                Thanks for the info guys. Is there a way to tell if it is full grain? Or will I have to ask the manufacturer? Anyone have experience with cheap shoes that happen to be full grain?
                The manufacturer will usually list if it is full grain. You can also feel it as well. Run your fingertips across a pair of allen edmonds leather at nordstrom and then do the same with a pair of kenneth cole reaction shoes. The full grain should feel smooth and nice while the other is "plastic" feeling. Here's a pair of well used allen edmonds from 1974 that I have which shows the importance of full grain. Potentially 39 years of wear (with a nice development of patina)!



                After a little TLC...



                *Of note, most full grain leather lasts 10-15 years before the creases start cracking with regular use (even if optimal care is taken). If you are looking for leather that will lasts your entire life go with real cordovon leather which can last a life time.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Acousticfoodie View Post
                  If you are looking for leather that will lasts your entire life go with real cordovon leather which can last a life time.
                  Nice, only 7 replies before someone mentions shell cordovan on an entry level shoes thread. I don't think everyone is as good at finding $8 shoes as you are.

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                    #10
                    For a finders fee of $250 per pair, Acousticfoodie will find as many high quality shoes on the cheap as you want! Just send your shoe size, mailing address, and money! =D

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Acousticfoodie View Post
                      The manufacturer will usually list if it is full grain. You can also feel it as well. Run your fingertips across a pair of allen edmonds leather at nordstrom and then do the same with a pair of kenneth cole reaction shoes. The full grain should feel smooth and nice while the other is "plastic" feeling. Here's a pair of well used allen edmonds from 1974 that I have which shows the importance of full grain. Potentially 39 years of wear (with a nice development of patina)!



                      After a little TLC...



                      *Of note, most full grain leather lasts 10-15 years before the creases start cracking with regular use (even if optimal care is taken). If you are looking for leather that will lasts your entire life go with real cordovon leather which can last a life time.
                      Holy sh*t! Those are from the 70's? They look absolutely amazing!

                      My Stacy Adams definitely feel plastic-y while the Giorgio Brutinis might be full grain (there was a scuff on the leather heel cup and it came right out with conditioner). Thanks again for enlightening me.

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                        #12
                        EBAY!

                        magnanni, mezlan, AE, Church, Alden

                        Just to name a few

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Acousticfoodie View Post
                          Resoling is nice but not imperative imo. The most important thing is to make sure the leather is full grain. You can always add sole savers and replace those as needed instead of resoling like this:

                          Can you explain your experience with the sole savers? Are they worth it? I seem to destroy the soles of my shoes no matter how nice the shoe is even after minimal usage.

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                            #14
                            If you live near a Johnston & Murphy outlet I would check them out. They do not get talked about much here, and their style can be hot and miss. The outlet is actually overstock and past season shoes, not seconds or a lower grade. They offer a wide variety of construction options from glued to Goodyear welt.

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                              #15
                              Don't forget Florsheim, they offer quite a few shoes of this nature.

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