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    #16
    Beckmans, Iron Rangers and Wolverine 1Ks are all great options. I usually use my Loake Litchfields (with a Dainte sole), pictured below. If it's really raining or I'll be walking through mud or something I'll just wear my Bean Boots.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Zeejet View Post
      Any suggestions for winter boots? Most available ones look terrible.
      If you like the look of DBs, the Clarks Bushacres are essentially the same shoe, but with a rubber sole. There's a slight difference in the colors between the two even though both are named beeswax and I've seen some claim the Bushacre has lower quality leather, but I've been happy with mine.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Tim View Post
        If you like the look of DBs, the Clarks Bushacres are essentially the same shoe, but with a rubber sole. There's a slight difference in the colors between the two even though both are named beeswax and I've seen some claim the Bushacre has lower quality leather, but I've been happy with mine.
        The Bushacre is indeed a synthetic sole (synthetic crepe...which I have never felt in my hands, but it looks to be harder and less supple). Considering that the price point for a Bushacre is only about 10 bucks less than a CDB, I doubt that the leathe rupper is inferior on the Bushacre. I think the price difference is in the sole.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Zeejet View Post
          There are 3 options for winter/rain boots that I like: RW Iron Rangers, Wolverine 1K's, and Chippewa Work Boots. THe CHippewa is only 107 bucks on Amazon whereas the other two are upwards of 300 bucks. Won't need them for awhile so I will hold out and see if prices drop any further.
          Prices have only been going up. A few years back you used to easily be able to find RWs and 1Ks in the $180 range. Now you're lucky if you can find them for $250. As a guy that owns way too many RWs and Wolverines, I'd suggest you get a pair of Chippewas if you really like how they look. The extra cost certainly won't buy you more durability or utility.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Fred G. Unn View Post
            I usually use my Loake Litchfields (with a Dainte sole), pictured below. If it's really raining or I'll be walking through mud or something I'll just wear my Bean Boots.
            Fred, I really like these. I had previously discarded the Litchfields because they look so unattractive in the stock photos, but yours are very nice. I may just join you in the Litchfield ownership club.

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              #21
              So the Chippewa website lists most of their classic boots (such as the Apache Lace-up) as NOT waterproof. Are they just being technical here? Or are they really not waterproof?

              http://www.chippewaboots.com/boots/classics/20065

              In fact, only a few of their special boots are listed as waterproofed. I emaile then and they sent me a cryptic and corporate-esque answer:

              Thank you for contacting Chippewa Boot Company. Chippewa does offer a variety of different styles to fit the demands of the end users. We do offer a combination of waterproofed, insulated, steel toe and non steel toe. The environment and conditions that the boots are being subjected to will play a very important role as to which style would be the best.

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                #22
                In work boot terms, "waterproof" generally refers to shoes that incorporate a waterproof membrane like Gore-Tex. The leather itself may or may not be treated to resist moisture.

                The Chippewa classic lace-ups are not sold in a waterproof or water-resistant state. But you can make them water-resistant by treating them with a waterproofing conditioner like Schnee's or Obenauf's LP. If you apply the conditioner correctly the shoes will be water-resistant for most purposes. You won't want to wade through ankle-deep pools, but they will repel rain, snow, splashes, and quick submersion like stepping briefly in puddles.
                Ben

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                  #23
                  Agree with BenR.

                  I think if you want something water resistant and stylish, you have to plan to buy a leather boot and put a little work into them. I cleaned and reapplied wax to my winter boots about once a month over the winter, partially to keep them looking sharper, partially to make sure the wax was still there, nice and thick, to keep the salt from the leather. It's about an hour of work once a month, not a big deal, and definitely worth it.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Zeejet View Post
                    Can Clark's desert boots be used as winter boots? I don't like the look of typical "winter boots".
                    I wear mine if it's dry out, but needed to add wool insoles (military surplus) and wear thicker socks. They're awful in anything wet, slippery and provide zero insulation.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Acousticfoodie View Post
                      As far as the order you listed. You'll clean first, then condition, then polish.
                      This is correct. If you want to waterproof I suggest Meltonian's spray protectant after the final polish. You'll need to buff again after.

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