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"Tie with no Jacket" Suggestion

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    #31
    Originally posted by LosRockets View Post
    To that end I think we've nailed it with making sure to have a patterned shirt and non-plain silk tie. I think if you've nailed in the fit up top (tailored but not restrictive) and on the bottom, then you're good. I think that might have been something not talked about as much here, but the pants shouldn't puddle at the waist or feet, they should have the minimal break you're comfortable with, and be slim fitting. Nice shoes help also. The problem is that we associate "shirt + tie, no jacket" with puffy shirt, bad tie, boring bootcut too long khakis, and square-toed black shoes.

    Barring Halloween or financial disaster or an acting gig hopefully we never have to dress like that again, so that's out the window. I do think patterned shirt + solid pants works better than solid shirt + patterned pants because the latter may look like you misplaced your suit jacket. (Though if you go tieless I think it's more acceptable, as this is what I wore last week)
    I'm going to agree entirely with LosRockets. Patterned shirt. Everything fits well.
    Measurements: 6'2", 173 lbs, 16" neck, 35/36" sleeve, 42" chest, 32" waist, 33.5" inseam

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      #32
      Originally posted by Xeones25 View Post
      As the "new" person on the job the last thing you want to do is make other people at the job uncomfortable in any way. Especially the boss.
      As the "new" person on the job, how do you know you're making people uncomfortable?


      Originally posted by Duvel View Post
      Has anyone ever gotten reprimanded for wearing a suit to work? Or dressing up too much? I don't understand how dressing a little better is something you "get away with" at work. Screw that. Own your style, and people will get used to it. "Oh, that's so and so. He likes to wear suits and ties."

      Here's some good advice: http://blogs.wsj.com/atwork/2012/08/...-wear-to-work/
      Yeah. I read the worries here and it sounds like the people worried about dressing "too nice" are the ones who are uncomfortable.

      I'm not saying wear a tux to the office, or a conservative suit in a place where everyone is in t-shirts, but dressing everyday the way people dress when meeting clients doesn't seem like too much of a stretch to me. It means you're ready. Always. That's a good thing.

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        #33
        Originally posted by Duvel View Post
        You make rigid and restricted sound like a bad thing.
        It doesn't even seem that restrictive. It's a description of dressing for an office, with a lot of flexibility in it. It didn't say "wear a suit" or "wear a tie" or anything. Good piece.

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          #34
          Originally posted by JT10000 View Post
          As the "new" person on the job, how do you know you're making people uncomfortable?
          I'm done after this. But by "new" I meant I'm the newest member/lowest on the totem pole. I've been working at my position for two years. I know the corporate environment and the norms/standards people are held at. When I went in for my last yearly review the very first thing my supervisor said (who I see twice a year) was "you don't need to dress up for this." I was wearing moleskin pants, chukkas, dress shirt, cardigan, and tie so in the NYC sense not dressed up at all. Things are different in different parts of the country and in different corporate cultures. I'm in engineering, not business, finance, or HR.
          Measurements: 6'2", 173 lbs, 16" neck, 35/36" sleeve, 42" chest, 32" waist, 33.5" inseam

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