Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Moving to England

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • maccoinnich
    replied
    Although Edinburgh is highly worth a visit, I think Leeds or York might be a bit easier to get to from Durham?

    Leave a comment:


  • Matt Sasco
    replied
    The notion of brown-country and black-city is a thing of the past, but some might still hold it in high regards.

    And Ryan, if I were you, I'd just hold out till you arrive in Britain. If you fly in to London, spend a couple of days exploring the city and you'll find that London is an amazing town for the well dressed man to shop in. I'm not sure about Durham, it might be smallish and hence not have the proper european and global brands, but to be fair, Edinburgh is kinda close, also excellent for shopping, and great sights too. And yes, general tips are: get your layering in order, stock up on thin V-necks, cardigans, maybe even vests to wear with suits/jackets, if you wear such that is. If not, go for some chunky knitwear, a cable knit fisherman sweater or heavy cardigan is great, but again, wait until you get here and go for a Shetland made one or some made in Scotland. Same goes for pretty much everything, the British are very good in nailing the classics, sometimes with a modern twist.

    Leave a comment:


  • thedrake
    replied
    This may have changed, but last time I talked to a brit they were baffled by wearing brown shoes with a suit and considered it bad style.

    Leave a comment:


  • bruschetta
    replied
    Originally posted by nicholascrawford View Post
    bruschetta - we poor folk!

    M&S...I was trying to think of that recently. We went grocery shopping there.

    Getting a cell phone was an experience. I asked the guy two questions that went south fast. I asked if he was Scottish, and he was offended, saying he was from Northern England. I also asked if the phone carrier had service in the dorms. He said they have service in the stores. Confused, I realized I should have asked if they have coverage in the dorms. =)
    M&S is too expensive for me. The prices are absurd; my groceries would come out to over Ā£60 per week if I shopped there ($90).

    Salesmen in the UK are generally ruder than in the US. The "customer is always right" customer service attitude is very much a US phenomena. If it makes you feel better, I also had trouble when I first wanted to buy a cell phone.

    Originally posted by maccoinnich View Post
    "The only good thing about Sainsburys is that it keeps the riff-raff out of Waitrose"
    Ha!

    Leave a comment:


  • maccoinnich
    replied
    Originally posted by bruschetta View Post
    Nicholas, please tell your wife that Tesco is for peasants. Proper people shop at Waitrose, M&S, or the Co-Op.
    "The only good thing about Sainsburys is that it keeps the riff-raff out of Waitrose"

    Leave a comment:


  • nicholascrawford
    replied
    bruschetta - we poor folk!

    M&S...I was trying to think of that recently. We went grocery shopping there.

    Getting a cell phone was an experience. I asked the guy two questions that went south fast. I asked if he was Scottish, and he was offended, saying he was from Northern England. I also asked if the phone carrier had service in the dorms. He said they have service in the stores. Confused, I realized I should have asked if they have coverage in the dorms. =)

    Leave a comment:


  • LittleNelly
    replied
    Originally posted by bruschetta View Post
    No. I like polo shirts, but I never see them here.
    Wow that really surprises me, maybe it has something to do with the disparate climates between the US and Great Britain, with England being much cooler in the summer. Can't imagine going a whole summer here without having this wardrobe staple.

    Leave a comment:


  • bruschetta
    replied
    Originally posted by Acousticfoodie View Post
    Wearing a polo shirt is equivalent to wearing flip flops???
    No. I like polo shirts, but I never see them here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Acousticfoodie
    replied
    Originally posted by bruschetta View Post

    In general, people dress better in the UK. I have never seen an adult male wear shorts, polo shirts, sandals, or flip flops here.
    Wearing a polo shirt is equivalent to wearing flip flops???

    Leave a comment:


  • bruschetta
    replied
    Originally posted by nicholascrawford View Post
    My wife got her Masters there and recommends getting a bike right away.

    I would interject that walking to Tesco from the dorms sounds like a good idea but is a bad idea in practice if your return trip starts after the last bus of the night. =P
    Nicholas, please tell your wife that Tesco is for peasants. Proper people shop at Waitrose, M&S, or the Co-Op.

    Ryan, I made a move from your area to the UK last year. My advice would be to stick with nicer clothing. In terms of pants: pressed chinos, moleskin, or medium-weight 3-season wool will work in just about any situation you'll run into as a student. Button down casual shirts are popular.

    Sweaters are essential. I recommend buying sweaters in the US since they'll be far less expensive. Wool is darned expensive in the UK.

    In general, people dress better in the UK. I have never seen an adult male wear shorts, polo shirts, sandals, or flip flops here. T-shirts are acceptable in your home, but most students at the postgraduate (masters and beyond) level do not wear them on campus.

    Leave a comment:


  • printyra
    replied
    become one with wool

    Leave a comment:


  • nicholascrawford
    replied
    My wife got her Masters there and recommends getting a bike right away.

    I would interject that walking to Tesco from the dorms sounds like a good idea but is a bad idea in practice if your return trip starts after the last bus of the night. =P

    Leave a comment:


  • lmwilson
    replied
    The key to cold weather is layering. Don't spend all your money on heavy outer layers. Some are necessary, but you will get far more use out of thin sweaters and other pieces that a heavy winter coat or boots.

    Also keep in mind that European clothes are generally much higher quality (and better looking) than american clothes. They will be a bit more expensive, but you will get a higher quality wardrobe if you wait until you get there to buy things.

    Leave a comment:


  • ryan.wicklund
    replied
    I was thinking about getting one, maybe a pea-coat as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Acousticfoodie
    replied
    How about a waxed/oiled jacket? It's a signature look for dealing with the cold weather there (although you don't need to buy a 1500 dollar barbour like the one below):

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X