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Watch Flaws: Inaccuracy of the "Seconds" Hand

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    Watch Flaws: Inaccuracy of the "Seconds" Hand

    During J.Crew's last 30% off clearance sale, I decided to pick up the Timex 1600 Watch. It was marked down to $185, with an additional 30% off. I also had a $50 gift card that I applied to the order, cutting the cost down to $90. I realize it's a Timex, but the aesthetics combined with drastically reduced price had won me over.

    Last week I received my order in the mail, and upon close examination, I notice that the "seconds" hand is catching in between the hash marks, rather then on point. My OCD with that kind of thing will not allow me to settle for such a serious flaw. I promptly called customer service and arranged for an exchange.

    Enter today, when the replacement arrives. Open the box. Same exact problem as the first one. Called in for an exchange, and they're not due to ship until 1/23/2013.

    Would this bother anyone else?


    #2
    This is a common problem with quartz watches, and it's not just limited to cheap ones, either. I've possessed an Omega Aqua Terra quartz and a Seamaster Professional quartz. The Seamaster hits the indices pretty well, but the Aqua Terra was all over the place. It hit the indices about half the time, and fell between them the other half.

    I've noticed it's a particular problem with Swiss quartz watches. Most of the Japanese quartz watches I've had have hit much more accurately, and have had less recoil or "bounce back" from the second hand. I have no idea who makes the movement in these Timex watches... most of Timex's normal watches have movements mass-produced in East Asia specifically for Timex. If this watch had a Swiss movement, I suspect it would say so in the specs. So I'm guessing perhaps a slightly higher-end, Chinese-made movement than Timex's usual fare.

    As to whether it's worth returning over... only you can decide that. A lot of people wouldn't care, but obviously you do. It's up to you to decide whether it bothers you enough that it will completely sour your perception of the watch.
    Ben

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      #3
      Thanks for the reply Ben. I know it will drive me completely crazy, as it's literally hitting between the hashes. Most obvious when it hits right before and after the 12 up top. Go figure, it happens on my first attempt at purchasing a watch with a brown strap.

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        #4
        I never noticed that o the J Crew Timex I owned, but I never really paid attention. I verified that my Tag Heuer F1 does not do that.

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          #5
          So after I received my THIRD flawed 1600 from J.Crew, I elected to call customer service once again. I would certainly imagine that if there's some kind of "High Maintenance" flag that can be applied to accounts, mine would absolutely have it. Long story short, after the original sale, and several bitching sessions, I'm paying about $55 out of pocket for the 1600. I can't imagine that they have one accurate second hand in their entire stock. What do you think? $55 for a slightly flawed, but aesthetically pleasing beater watch?

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            #6
            For $55 I would probably keep it. Whatever its flaws, the 1600 is one of the best-looking watches available at the moment. If you really wanted to, you could probably take it to a watchmaker and ask them to either align the second hand more accurately, or just remove it altogether. I love a quartz dress watch with no seconds hand... all the benefits of quartz accuracy, plus the elegance of not having that tick-tock action.
            Ben

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              #7
              Great looking watch. This is why I couldn't work in customer service. I would have been really tempted to ask if you knew you bought a timex when complaining about second hand not matching up perfectly. Nobody will notice it except you. Don't sweat it.

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                #8
                Thanks for the replies guys. The face on this guy seems a touch smaller than the standard J.Crew Military Watch. I've gotten so used to wearing 40mm and up, that the 1600 feels / looks tiny on my wrist. May take some getting used to. My 44 mm Hamilton has the opposite effect

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