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    #16
    I don't think you need to worry much about ties. You should diversify the material eventually, but I'm not sure that should be your priority right out of the box. Get rid of worn out items first. Pull out your dress shirts and figure out which ones fit and which ones don't. Donate the stuff that doesn't fit. Same for your trousers, your blazers and suits. Systematically remove the poor fitting items. Then you can truly fill the holes and re-build your wardrobe with classic, well fitting pieces. At least that is what I would recommend.

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      #17
      Originally posted by KC View Post
      Wait...why are you getting rid of those ties on the right? I sort of like that purple one with the white dots. Regarding ties, it looks like you're pretty well set on the more formal ties/ones you can wear with button up shirts. Have you considered knit or wool ties to add a bit of texture in your more casual getups? Not everyone is a fan of those, but I like the look and it could help you branch out, especially if you plan on expanding your wardrobe past professional.
      Well, the ones on the right never get worn and some of them aren't in great shape anymore. If you're referring to the one that is second from the left in the set on the right, it's not purple and they aren't exactly polkadots. It's a dark reddish color with a little geometric design.

      I confess that I may have purchased a couple of shirt and tie combinations before...the kind that come in a clear box together

      I will do a shirt rundown shortly--that part of my wardrobe is in much worse shape.

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        #18
        Originally posted by jputman08 View Post
        I don't think you need to worry much about ties. You should diversify the material eventually, but I'm not sure that should be your priority right out of the box. Get rid of worn out items first. Pull out your dress shirts and figure out which ones fit and which ones don't. Donate the stuff that doesn't fit. Same for your trousers, your blazers and suits. Systematically remove the poor fitting items. Then you can truly fill the holes and re-build your wardrobe with classic, well fitting pieces. At least that is what I would recommend.
        For anything that doesn't fit well, determine if its cheaper to tailor it or to replace it before you toss it out. If its worn out, letting it go may be the best choice.

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          #19
          I just ordered 8 shirts from TM lewin using the %20 off code.

          Ordered more so staple solids to have them handy(a few non irons for backup) for around $240 shipped and that was the 4 for 100 not the 5 for 100 special that was on. majority were the fully fitted style and some were slim. I will post after, as a few people said TM lewin sucked vs CT and others said they were just as good if not better. For $30 a shirt I couldn't resist (would have been even less if i got the 10 hah)

          it ends on the 25th I believe so if you need shirts I'd suggest taking advantage, get your measurements too if you don't know them and use size chart.

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            #20
            @shad0w4life, Ordered TM Lewin a year ago after having mostly been a CT guy for 4 years. While they are certainly fine and nice shirts, I do think the quality in the CT shirts were better. My only problem with CT is that the tailored size still leaves a decent bit of billowing, whereas TM Lewin's fully fitted is near perfect in the body.

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              #21
              shad0w4life, I dislike TM Lewin as a brand. I ordered a few different things from them recently (cold weather clothing such as sweaters, vests, etc.) and I returned everything. The quality was too low for my standard. For some comparison, both Charles Tyrwhitt and Uniqlo were better quality. TM Lewin also took nearly 3 weeks to process my return, whereas Charles Tyrwhitt's customer support is exceptional. Another thing to consider: the collars on TM Lewin shirts look off to me. You may have the same impression.

              FraserCA, I would start by creating a list of the items that you absolutely want in your wardrobe. For example:

              2 Charcoal flannel pants.
              3 sport coats of various styles.
              1 navy blazer.
              2 suits.
              4 solid colour dress shirts.
              2 patterned dress shirts.
              etc.

              This process will help you see what you have and what you still want.

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                #22
                I wouldn't tailor your billowy shirts unless they are of high quality. You can get new slim shirts for only a little more than what it would cost to tailor.

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                  #23
                  Welcome! Dappered has a great community and we're glad to have you be a part of it.

                  Agree w/ everything Bruschetta has said about TM Levin vs. CT. I've only tried on TM shirts at a local consignment store, but they felt decidedly worse than my CT shirts. Must also say that calling CT and hearing a live human (with British accent!) pick up immediately is an awesome feeling.

                  The list is also good advice - I keep such a list and what I often do is everytime I add something to this list, I hold off on buying it for a few weeks. I need to forget about wanting it and then go back and think - now in the past 3 -4 weeks, would I have worn that item at all? Why did I want it? Was it a perceived need because of #menswear, or is it an actual need? That process has saved me a lot of money and helped me hone in on what I would use the most.

                  NC and a few others have posted this in the forums, but it bears repeating: Too often we get caught up in this idea of quality and "this will last a lifetime, get it now." And while it's true that men's style is a lot more stable than women's, it's okay to buy one or two pieces at a time - slowly - and build up your collection as you develop your own sense of style and confidence in your new appearance. While you're experimenting, you don't need to go out an buy an expensive cardigan, a cheap one from H&M will do just fine until you know whether or not you and your wife like how you look in cardigans. It's okay to spend less - chances are, as long as it fits people will think it costs much more than you paid for it. The internet is paradoxically both a very large and also a very small place, and menswear sites can make you feel like everybody is going to notice everything. They don't

                  I'd say to save the money for an extra pair of pants/dress shirt and put them towards tailoring if you can; it's worth it. Also, when in stores, always try a size smaller than you expect. You may be pleasantly surprised, or at the very worst it'll fit terribly and you'll learn more about what's a good look and fit for you. I agree that a 42R sounds off for you, get measured at a tailor when you take some shirts in.

                  Bottom line: find a style and clothing that fits you and your budget. Post those shirts when you can (along w/ a fit pic of one if you don't mind) and we can help suggest which ones may be worth salvaging at the tailor and how to shop differently!

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                    #24
                    I was where you are six months ago. I started rebuilding from the ground up: quality socks, boxers, and V neck Tshirts.

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