Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

White's Perry Moc Toe - First Impressions

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    White's Perry Moc Toe - First Impressions


    Hi y’all. Just wanted to rave on a new pair of boots I bought, the White’s Perry Moc Toe workboot. I've been bugging Joe about these boots all fall, which he kindly acknowledged on the site during his various boot postings. Well, I pulled the trigger during White's recent Black Friday sale and here's what I think after having them on my feet for a couple weeks. I love boots. And these are great boots! There you go – that’s the BLUF. If you want to follow me down the rabbit hole, here’s a few more details…

    Company: White’s Boots. The original “PNW” – Pacific Northwest bootmaker. Started before the Civil War and moved to Spokane, Washington at the beginning of the 20th Century. My mom was born and raised in Spokane, so I love that connection. Sometime in the last few years, White’s was sold to the same Japanese-owned umbrella company that owns Danner and some other American heritage brands. It’s kind of a bummer that it’s not family-owned anymore, but otherwise reports are positive that other than the ownership, everything else stayed the same. Everybody in the factory kept their jobs, and they are still making the boots the same as they always have. White’s is most famous for their logger and fire fighter boots. In fact, that was pretty much all they made until a few years ago when followed Red Wing’s lead making “lifestyle” or “heritage” boots. Maybe that was a move by the new owners, but it seems to have been good for the brand. A year ago, they introduced the Perry as their first boot under $300. Now they have two – the Perry and the Millwood, which is essentially the same boot but with a round toe.

    Construction: If you really want to geek out on boot construction, I highly recommend a Youtube channel called Rose Anvil, in which the dude who runs it has made a whole schtick out of cutting boots in half to see the internal components, which I find more entertaining than it sounds. He has done a couple videos on the Perry and if you are really interested in this boot, I would recommend watching that video and maybe his other moc toe boot videos to get a good idea of the market. Short version – these boots are solid. Very thick leather uppers (from the Seidel tannery, if you care about such things). Quad and triple sticking all over. Leather and cork insole. Vibram Christy outsole. There are two areas where they use man-made material instead of leather to control the cost – the heel counter (heavyduty cardboard) and the midsole (rubber). On the counter, while leather is of course preferred, apparently, White’s uses this cardboard in their fire boots without issue and, anyway, its sandwiched between two generous hunks of full-grain. I’m not particularly worried about it. The rubber midsole seems to par for the course at this price range and is also used by Red Wing and others. You’ve got to step up to the $500 price point to get all-leather everything in this style of boots. My personal opinion with these on my feet now is they are a solid value for the $279 MSRP and a steal for the sale price I paid. I mean, these are a no-kidding lifetime purchase. I’ll see how fast the Christy wedge sole wears down, but no doubt these uppers a good for quite a few resolings.

    Size and fit: In a nutshell, I’m a 11.5 E on the Brannock, and I got an 11E. White’s does recommend going a half-size down from Brannock, but I also traced and measured my feet, following the guidance on the fitting page. It also calculated me at 11E, but I was within a quarter inch or so of 10.5 and pretty close to a D width too. I opted to go at the top end of my sizing spectrum since I need to fit orthotics (getting old sucks). So far, so good. The boots sometimes feel roomy, but once I’ve been walking around a while, my foot swells up and they’re fine. I might have a bit more space in front of my toe than optimal, but that’s just due to the last shape. These have a very large toebox. They’re work boots, after all. No sleekness here. Still, I get a little hypochondrial about the fit – “is it slipping too much? Should I have gotten the 10.5 instead?” If I were doing it again – and I do hope to order more White’s boots in the future – I would call someone at White’s and discuss fitting in person, just to have a little more confidence in the fit since I can’t try them on in person. As it is, I can live with it.

    Wear: I’ve been wearing these as much as I can. The boots are very comfortable. From a function perspective, these boots will handle anything I’ll throw at them. They are solid, but not overbuilt for my lifestyle like White’s Smokejumper boots would be. I like to be outdoors, working around my property and running around nearby woods. But I also work in the city and spend plenty of time in built environments. The Christy outsole is quite bouncy and a good choice for the urban jungle. The downside of the wedge soles is they don’t have great traction in the woods, though I do appreciate that they are quieter and less clunky than a lugged sole. In fact, many bowhunters who hunt on the ground and rely on stealth prefer this type of boot over traditional heavy hunting boots. From a form perspective, the Perry’s are great looking boots. They match the sort of Americana/workwear style I enjoy and fit right in with my jeans and flannels. As my office has become more casual in the post-Covid times, I’ll be able to wear them to work quite a lot. I was thinking about the Perry’s fire fighting progeny. In my office, we sometimes say “putting out fires” to mean solving emerging problems quickly. So while the Perry might not be optimized for real wildfire work, they happen to be quite adept at my sort of “firefighting”, which is to say they enhance my ability to do my job because I look good and feel good.

    I would recommend these to anyone looking for a heritage-style boot that can take a good deal of abuse. As a pure workboot, these are an alternative to the Red Wing moc toe and could handle most any job that doesn’t require safety toes. (White’s even makes an 8” version that might be better for actual work than the 6” model I have). For a guy like me – office worker who likes to run around and get dirty on the weekend – they are very practical daily footwear. So there you go, one guy’s unsolicited opinion on the White’s Perry Moc Toe boot.

    #2
    Thanks for review. I got a kick out of the “ your firefighting” I have been going back and forth between the Whites moc toe and the Thorogood ones. If they keep the same construction and heel counter as the fire boots than that price range is incredible. Their fire boots are incredible. What’s holding me back from pulling the trigger on both of my options is the fit and the traction.
    My boot size is all messed up due to insert for high arches. Also, I live in the desert and the moc toe boots are the 2nd favorite type of boots, cowboy boots are 1st. Do you think the Perry’s have the ability to work in a rock and sand environment? Also, how does it do against dirt on the cream heel?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by jvargas View Post
      Thanks for review. I got a kick out of the “ your firefighting” I have been going back and forth between the Whites moc toe and the Thorogood ones. If they keep the same construction and heel counter as the fire boots than that price range is incredible. Their fire boots are incredible. What’s holding me back from pulling the trigger on both of my options is the fit and the traction.
      My boot size is all messed up due to insert for high arches. Also, I live in the desert and the moc toe boots are the 2nd favorite type of boots, cowboy boots are 1st. Do you think the Perry’s have the ability to work in a rock and sand environment? Also, how does it do against dirt on the cream heel?
      Thanks for the kind words! Let try to tackle all your comments to the best of my ability.

      Firstly, between White's and Thorogood. Tough call. I feel you. On paper, the White's have a better spec. In the real world, lots of working men love and swear by Thorogood. The Thorogood moc toes have a plastic welt and poron/fiberboard insole. In theory, that's not as good as the leather welt and insole on the White's. In the real world, they seem to hold up fine through multiple resoles. YMMV. Thorogood is a great brand and Weinbrenner Shoe Company is employee owned and the sort of heritage manufacturer that we should all be supporting and rooting for, so I wouldn't steer you away from them. But I still think that White's are a better value for the money.

      Secondly, on the Perry's construction. To be clear, White's uses a couple of different construction types across their boot models. The highend fire boots, like the Smokejumper, are stitchdown constructed and have leather shanks, midsoles and counters (pretty sure). Not like the Perry boots. The Perries are more similar to White's lower end, Goodyear welted fire boots like the Line Scout model. Those are probably the ones with the heavy cardboard counters. Now, those boots are still like $350 and very heavy duty. Not cheap boots. But they're not the top of the line Smokejumpers.

      Thirdly, on inserts. I am using custom inserts for plantar fasciitis and find the Perry boots, sized down a half-size from Brannock, have plenty of volume for the inserts. I just pulled out the included inserts and put in my own. Again, YMMV. But I would say there's hope they'll fit your inserts too.

      Fourthly, rock and sand. The big LIMFAC here is the wedge sole on the Perry, which is a Vibram Cristy. I have heard that the Cristy is a little softer than other wedge soles used by Red Wing and Thorogood. To me, that would indicate they are somewhat grippier on rocks and sand, but will wear down faster. Personally, I would not use the Perry as a dedicated rock scrambling or hiking boot, but I think it can hold its own if called into that duty. No different than other wedge soled boots. Also, as far as sand goes, the Perry's tongue is half-gusseted up to where the eyelets end and the speedhooks start. So, it should be fairly adept at keeping sand out. I believe that Thorogood's waterproof moc toe has a fully gusseted tongue, so that would be even better at keeping out the sand if you expend to get into some deep dunes or whatnot. Now that I think about it, the 8" Perry might have a taller gusset on the tongue too. Might be worth asking White's about.

      Fifthly, dirty cream heels. Not a problem. I don't find that the wedge sole gets excessively dirty, certainly not as bad a crepe sole. Plus, it is easy to clean with a Magic Eraser, should you desire to return it to shiny newness.

      Hope that helps your decision. You really can't go wrong with either boot, in my opinion. Or Red Wing either. All good boots.

      Comment

      Working...
      X