Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Elbow patches for sweaters

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Elbow patches for sweaters

    I have a wool sweater that I've been stitching holes shut over the years, now it's got one the size of a dime on one elbow. It's nice enough that it is worth keeping (and repairing) but not so nice that I think it would look out of place with patches on the elbows, especially when worn smart-casual.

    Has anyone put elbow patches on a sweater? Thoughts on material? Denim, suede, leather, fabric, other? Sew them on or iron on? Thoughts on the look? Is it worth it? All thoughts welcome.

    #2
    I have a J Crew merino wool sweater that had suede elbow patches when I bought it - I like it quite a bit, but it is a "rustic" sweater (kind of a chunky knit and had some pilling when I bought it). I have another v-neck sweater that has developed a hole like the one you describe.

    I am a huge fan of repairing/mending from an environmental/waste reduction perspective, but I know it is somewhat trickier with knits than shirts, say. My vote would be for repairing the hole without adding elbow patches. If it were me, I would think it could end up being kind of tricky and potentially expensive to add them, and even then they may look out of place. Definitely prefer suede to denim or some other fabric if you do go for it.

    Comment


      #3
      I did this once with an old(ish) Uniqlo lambswool sweater. I just took it to the local dry cleaning/alterations store and they did it with suede patches for about $25, which was probably more than it should actually cost. It was a deep red sweater with brown patches, and I thought the end result was pretty classy. I think it's a context-dependent look, though. I'm an academic, and at the time I was at an elite northeastern college - the type of place that doesn't really have a classic collegiate or Ivy aesthetic anymore, but there's enough of a survival that I could get away with the look. Depending on where you want to wear it, I wonder if patches could come across as an affectation or excessively 'tweedy'. Also depends on the exact type of sweater and what you wear it with though.
      zelozelatus
      Junior Member
      Last edited by zelozelatus; December 14, 2021, 11:52 AM.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by zelozelatus View Post
        I wonder if patches could come across as an affectation or excessively 'tweedy'.

        ...and there's something wrong w/ "excessively tweed-y" (read as tongue firmly in cheek)

        as I am loving layering and tweed right now, this was my gut response

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by hauttedogge View Post


          ...and there's something wrong w/ "excessively tweed-y" (read as tongue firmly in cheek)

          as I am loving layering and tweed right now, this was my gut response
          Ha, I say this as someone who proudly owns and regularly wears a tweed jacket... but there's a time and a place for it

          Comment


            #6
            I was thinking suede too. Maybe moleskin. Definitely a rustic look, but would totally work in a hard-earned, wabi-sabi kind of way.

            P.S. Sew-on, for sure. Have your tailor do it if you're not handy with a thread and needle. Iron-on patches always start peeling off sooner or later, usually sooner. I don't even know how you would iron something onto a knitted fabric.

            Comment


              #7
              I think elbow patches work really well on a chunky knit shawl collar sweater or maybe on something like a Shetland or coarser lambswool. On a finer-knit merino wool I'm not sure that would look right. Basically if he fabric is "tweedy" - heavily textured and rustic - then elbow patches will probably work. If it's dressier/more refined then not so much.
              “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

              Comment


                #8
                Hello!

                I have used iron-on patches and then sewn them on to keep them on. I noticed without the sewing, they come off at the dry cleaners.

                Comment

                Working...
                X