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Shirt collar style: Point lengths? Spread?

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    Shirt collar style: Point lengths? Spread?

    Dress shirt collars can give off different ideas about someone and can vary differently, from a Eton collar to a button-down.
    Recently, having come across Proper Cloth's plethora of collar options, I have thought about which one looks more appropriate and fitting for a headshot picture and/or interviews.
    With their option of the traditional English collar, the collar comes off as being smaller than the norm at 2 3/4" point lengths with a 5" spread. Similarly, the President spread has a similar look but with 3 1/8" point lengths and a 5 1/2" spread. On the other side of the spectrum, their conservative cutaway comes in at 3" point lengths and a 6" spread.

    Which of these looks best in a LinkedIn profile picture or Interview setting (Banking)?
    Note: with half-Windsor knot and a navy suit

    I have attached links with pictures.

    Also, what is the formality of a collar by spread and point lengths? relation to one another?
    Would a more "symmetrical" collar be more aesthetic? elegant...classy? formal?
    Is there a rule on "tucking in" the points below the lapels? (obviously not sticking out but rather the tip of the points staying hidden) Should you want the points to be seen or not?

    https://propercloth.com/collar-styles/londoner-ii
    https://propercloth.com/collar-style...-spread-collar
    https://propercloth.com/collar-style...dent-spread-ii

    #2
    The best option really depends more on your physical characteristics. Longer collar points would work well on taller guys and wider spreads better for broader builds. You also want to consider the size of your tie knot and lapel width. Its all about keeping things in proportion. Unfortunately its hard to know exactly what these collars will look like until you can try it out in person. I'd go with the middle ground option for a trial run and then adjust accordingly with future shirts. You can also measure an existing shirt collar that you like and make a judgement.

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      #3
      Geo’s advice is quite good. This is mostly a matter if taste/preference. I have personally found it useful for my own purposes to understand proportion and how the various things I wear work together.

      The advice of others can’t necessarily be the thing that decides for you, as each person’s ideas might be exactly that - personal.

      It can be useful to look at a lot of photos online to help you with this. For example when it comes to collar points tucked under lapels. Looks at a lot of photos of men in suits online and pay particular attention to that. What do YOU thinks looks better?

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        #4
        As noted above, this is very much one of those "it depends" questions. What best suits you is based upon all of the factors mentioned.

        That said, there are certain useful guidelines. Proportion is key, much like matching jacket lapels and tie width. As such the collar should be large enough to cover the loop of the tie, narrow enough at the opening to cover at least the upper ends of the knot (whichever knot you choose), and tall enough to be visible above the jacket collar.

        Points under the jacket lapel becomes more appropriate the wider the collar opening and the longer the points. A notably narrow opening, such as seen on Daniel Craig in Skyfall, makes tucking the points impossible (even lacking pins or tabs). Anything narrower than full spread and point lengths in line with modern lapel width usually can't tuck either. Modern collars aren't really big enough to need tucking anyway; they're not big enough to flap in the breeze. Short answer: don't worry about it.

        And if you're still unsure after all this, just aim for the conservative middle of each aspect. Unless you've got a truly unusual physique or tie, the median-size semi-spread will look just fine.
        Last edited by Galcobar; July 24, 2021, 05:17 AM.

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