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    Casual chinos vs...

    So I read the article on Dappered about "How to dress up without really dressing up." Cool ideas, I like the one about wearing casual chinos instead of shorts. But I didn't understand the distinction of "casual" chinos vs another type of chino pant. Are there some that are more dressy? What makes them more dressy, besides maybe the quality? Would I be able to wear some chinos to work and not others? Is this why my chinos are wrinkly like ALL the time???
    Set me straight.

    #2
    To me a 'casual' chino is a pair without an ironed-in crease. Maybe with a rolled-cuff and double-row stitching down the outseam. The latter point I saw Mark Cho of The Armoury talk about. Lastly perhaps dressy chino fabric would have slightly more sheen than a casual one. Personally I only have 'casual' chinos and enjoy having all the wrinkles.

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      #3
      I think fabric weight/weave/texture has a lot to do with it. Some chinos that are more twill-y and are a little rougher have a decidedly casual feel, and I consider them on par with a nice pair of jeans in terms of formality. Others are a little finer and fit a little more like wool trousers, and those feel like a step up for me.

      Bonobos, chino overlords that they are, kind of exemplify this across their range. They have a washed chino (I own a pair) that definitely feels pretty casual. But they also have "refined chinos," and I think their weekday warrior pants, by virtue of being cotton, would probably also qualify. The latter of these I would definitely wear with a sportcoat and tie, and the former of which I would not. None of my chinos have a crease.

      But I think distinctions can be fuzzy and few outside the menswear world would really notice or care.

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        #4
        Aside from fabric and creases, there's also the design: five-pocket where it's cut like jeans with horizontal front pockets and stitched-on rears, or with hidden slash pockets. As with jackets, the more obvious the pockets the more casual the clothing. As a basic rule, sleek, smooth and crisp are adjectives more associated with the formal end of the spectrum, while bulky, rugged, rough or rumpled describe the casual end.

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          #5
          This:

          Originally posted by Galcobar View Post
          Aside from fabric and creases, there's also the design: five-pocket where it's cut like jeans with horizontal front pockets and stitched-on rears, or with hidden slash pockets. As with jackets, the more obvious the pockets the more casual the clothing. As a basic rule, sleek, smooth and crisp are adjectives more associated with the formal end of the spectrum, while bulky, rugged, rough or rumpled describe the casual end.
          WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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            #6
            Originally posted by Galcobar View Post
            there's also the design: five-pocket where it's cut like jeans with horizontal front pockets and stitched-on rears, or with hidden slash pockets.
            Agreed, though I'm not sure I would even call those chinos -- I feel like I see those described as "five pocket pants" or some such. But yes, that style is decidedly more casual.

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