Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Princeton University

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • mark4
    replied
    Originally posted by DocDave View Post
    dancinginyourhead Psh. Everyone knows that if you sign up for your class you also have to write about the latest Fast and Furious move too
    Don't forget Star Wars.

    Leave a comment:


  • DocDave
    replied
    dancinginyourhead Psh. Everyone knows that if you sign up for your class you also have to write about the latest Fast and Furious move too

    Leave a comment:


  • mebejoseph
    replied
    Originally posted by dancinginyourhead View Post
    I'll second mark4, AndrewG, and Hemsprong, Mark99

    The first few weeks, I would plan on wearing polo shirts, plain or simple-patterned t-shirts, chinos or chino shorts, and classic sneakers or boat shoes. Then you can figure it out from there once the weather becomes more comfortable.
    I could never bring myself to wear shorts to class--not undergrad, which I did late (in my mid-30's) and not to law school. I don't even like to wear them to eat in a restaurant.

    I didn't go to an Ivy--I went to law school at UCLA--and in the LA casual environment, even 25 years ago, lots of students wore shorts to class. Even pajamas. Not kidding.

    To the OP: I've had close relative who lived in Princeton and I visited there as recently as four years ago. From what I remember, based on your post, it sounds like you'll be much more dressed up than the typical student. That's not a bad thing--I'm almost always the most dressed up person most places I go--but make sure you feel comfortable being that 'stand out".

    Leave a comment:


  • andrewrg
    replied
    Originally posted by mark4 View Post

    Yeah I'm curious too. Maybe one of the humanities as those are perceived as less "serious" than the hard sciences, or even the social "sciences" which I'm not sure qualify to be sciences and I say that as a guy who did Economics, which is thought of as the most scientific (because we embraced math early on). Although people in the humanities tend to take them seriously. I'm tempted to guess Leisure Studies. Yes that is a major on many college campuses and is not the joke the name implies. .

    Originally posted by dancinginyourhead View Post
    I'm in English/Popular Culture Studies. So students sign up for my class thinking they're already experts and can just write about how awesome their favorite Marvel movie is.
    Actually, that sounds like some interesting study! I teach music. I studied classical music at a conservatory, but studying the changing and intersecting trends in popular music has been a great source of interest for me recently. I played Mozart and Shostakovich in school, but I'm teaching students to play Metallica and Hip Hop now. And they're surprised by how complex those things can be, just as I've been surprised how innovative the seemingly simplest songs can be.

    Leave a comment:


  • dancinginyourhead
    replied
    I'm in English/Popular Culture Studies. So students sign up for my class thinking they're already experts and can just write about how awesome their favorite Marvel movie is.

    Leave a comment:


  • mark4
    replied
    Originally posted by andrewrg View Post

    Now I have to ask, what subject matter is that?!
    Yeah I'm curious too. Maybe one of the humanities as those are perceived as less "serious" than the hard sciences, or even the social "sciences" which I'm not sure qualify to be sciences and I say that as a guy who did Economics, which is thought of as the most scientific (because we embraced math early on). Although people in the humanities tend to take them seriously. I'm tempted to guess Leisure Studies. Yes that is a major on many college campuses and is not the joke the name implies. .

    Leave a comment:


  • andrewrg
    replied
    Originally posted by dancinginyourhead View Post
    The second is that I teach in a less classically "serious" subject matter, and I'm trying to convey to students that they will still have to do a large amount of reading and writing in my course.
    Now I have to ask, what subject matter is that?!

    Leave a comment:


  • dancinginyourhead
    replied
    Originally posted by mark4 View Post

    I don't know what field you are in but I did my grad school work at Michigan State and later worked for a couple years at a research institute at the University of Illinois where, being a university employee, I could take classes for free. I took a stats course there and I swear the prof was wearing a polo and chinos. When it got hot late spring I think he even wore shorts. My cousin teaches at PSU and the best he does is chinos and a polo. The profs at MSU also almost never wore jackets and ties and this was in the Economics department. What I'm saying is, unless you teach Law or Business School classes you could probably get away with short sleeves and no tie or jacket for the first few weeks until the temps dip a little.
    This is certainly true. I am definitely one of the more formally dressed professors. But a couple of things lead me to dress more formally than some of my colleagues. The first is that I look young. I'm in my late 30s, but I am still often mistaken for a grad student or, hilariously, an undergrad. The second is that I teach in a less classically "serious" subject matter, and I'm trying to convey to students that they will still have to do a large amount of reading and writing in my course.

    But anyway, to the original poster, simple things that fit well and that you can wear with confidence would be the way to go. Good luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • mark4
    replied
    Originally posted by dancinginyourhead View Post
    I'll second mark4, AndrewG, and Hemsprong, Mark99

    As I'm sure you know, Princeton does have the reputation of being more conservative (in terms of politics and dress) than the other Ivies. But honestly, I wouldn't imagine too many people at Princeton actually dress "Ivy League" in a way that a lot of us have romanticized notions of based on movies, TV, etc. I went to Columbia for undergrad and Penn for my Ph.D. in the first decade of the 2000s. Other than the Wharton undergrads wearing something black, ill-fitting, and likely polyester for a class presentation, I hardly ever saw college students in a sport coat. (MBA/Law students is a slightly different story.)

    Keep in mind also that when you arrive in August, it's still going to be hot. I'm a professor now at a Big 10 University in the midwest, and I'm always cursing the 90-degree heat indexes the first few weeks of class, when I'm wearing a jacket, oxford shirt, and a tie to teach in. The first few weeks, I would plan on wearing polo shirts, plain or simple-patterned t-shirts, chinos or chino shorts, and classic sneakers or boat shoes. Then you can figure it out from there once the weather becomes more comfortable.
    I don't know what field you are in but I did my grad school work at Michigan State and later worked for a couple years at a research institute at the University of Illinois where, being a university employee, I could take classes for free. I took a stats course there and I swear the prof was wearing a polo and chinos. When it got hot late spring I think he even wore shorts. My cousin teaches at PSU and the best he does is chinos and a polo. The profs at MSU also almost never wore jackets and ties and this was in the Economics department. What I'm saying is, unless you teach Law or Business School classes you could probably get away with short sleeves and no tie or jacket for the first few weeks until the temps dip a little.

    Leave a comment:


  • dancinginyourhead
    replied
    I'll second mark4, AndrewG, and Hemsprong, Mark99

    As I'm sure you know, Princeton does have the reputation of being more conservative (in terms of politics and dress) than the other Ivies. But honestly, I wouldn't imagine too many people at Princeton actually dress "Ivy League" in a way that a lot of us have romanticized notions of based on movies, TV, etc. I went to Columbia for undergrad and Penn for my Ph.D. in the first decade of the 2000s. Other than the Wharton undergrads wearing something black, ill-fitting, and likely polyester for a class presentation, I hardly ever saw college students in a sport coat. (MBA/Law students is a slightly different story.)

    Keep in mind also that when you arrive in August, it's still going to be hot. I'm a professor now at a Big 10 University in the midwest, and I'm always cursing the 90-degree heat indexes the first few weeks of class, when I'm wearing a jacket, oxford shirt, and a tie to teach in. The first few weeks, I would plan on wearing polo shirts, plain or simple-patterned t-shirts, chinos or chino shorts, and classic sneakers or boat shoes. Then you can figure it out from there once the weather becomes more comfortable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hemsprong
    replied
    You should wear whatever you'd like/whatever makes you feel comfortable. That said, it's cold in Princeton in the winter -- get a good warm coat and some decent boots. Congrats BTW.

    Leave a comment:


  • mark4
    replied
    I went to a small liberal arts college (graduated in the early '90s). Most of the guys who went to an actual prep school that I attended college with hardly ever dressed pretty or trad. Most of them were in beat up jeans and a beat up crewneck sweatshirt with a T shirt or maybe a long sleeved shirt with a collar underneath if it was colder. They had money, but liked to dress like they didn't have money except on special occasions (frat or sorority formals mostly). It might be different at Princeton because that is Trad central but I don't know. These guys were mostly from CT/MA/NH/VT/ME and came from old money, or at least not super new money, and seemed like the kinds of guys who would be full on trad if full on trad were still a thing that happened on college campuses. For non-sweatshirt shirts they mostly wore casual button ups - either flannel or corduroy in winter and polos and t shirts when it was warm. In cold weather they'd wear wool crew neck sweaters - usually shetland or lambswool (merino sweaters were not a thing yet). For outer wear there were a lot of corduroy collar barn/field jackets or poly-fleece (Patagonia synchilla mostly) because that was the new cool thing back then. They did wear chinos some - mostly well broken in ones.

    I don't say this to crap all over your dreams of wearing trad stuff but unless you want to come off as one of the campus dandys I wouldn't wear a sport coat and rep stripe tie and chinos to your first day of class thinking everyone is going to be dressed like Alex P. Keaton which you probably don't know who he is anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • mebejoseph
    replied
    Originally posted by andrewrg View Post

    I don't know where you grew up, but don't make the mistake I made when I moved to a place that actually had winter. Get a real winter coat. A black or charcoal pea coat would work nicely, especially if you layer a thin jacket underneath it, you'd be plenty warm. And a knit beanie.
    Excellent advice.

    After living in Southern California for a few decades and then finally traveling back to a place that was having winter, and only having a slightly lined trench coat with me, my first thought was: "Crap! I forgot how cold 12 degrees is!"

    Leave a comment:


  • tankerjohn
    replied
    Congratulations on your acceptance into such a prestigious institution. Last I checked, J. Press still has a store in New Haven and presumably still caters to the student population there or at least recent grads. I'm sure if you give that store a call, they could give you a good read on a modernized Ivy Style that looks traditionally stylish, but not anachronistic.

    Leave a comment:


  • jvargas
    replied
    I would add two things. Go look for a good wool seater Those you usually can get from thrift stores.
    I know not clothing advice but I would be remiss if I didn’t share it. I would start looking into the Author Cal Newport. He is now writes more about tech but he is famous for productivity writing and made his first impact with college advice writing. He wrote his college advice books and blog while at Dartmouth and MIT. He lays out a really good schedule, how to work and enjoy college at the same time, how to study and actually learn it. A bit outdated on some the tech ideas but concepts are great. You have to dig into his blog to find old college advice but his books are very much available. Good luck
    https://www.calnewport.com/books/straight-a-student/
    Last edited by jvargas; June 7, 2021, 10:28 AM.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X