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Casual Clothing Tips

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    Casual Clothing Tips



    Hey all.. I want to know what kind of smart casual clothing tips you follow in your daily routine.

    #2
    Hi, I sometimes find it helpful to think about shoes first. If I'm going to wear sneakers, they would be great with chinos, which in turn would be good with an Oxford shirt, polo, etc. If I'm wearing boots (not chukkas though), it would necessitate jeans, which then determine a certain type of shirt. Often times my shoes are the limiting/determining item in my casual wardrobe.

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      #3
      Two separate posts within one since “smart casual” is one of those terms that baffles me on what exactly we’re defining it as.

      1- not at work nor church; really just defining casual dress while looking put together.

      Chinos or flat front shorts
      Untucked t-shirt, polo, or Henley
      Leather jacket or chore coat if applicable
      Chukkas, loafers, espadrilles, or worn white canvas sneakers

      2 - at work but trying to put a label on something between business casual and sweats.

      Chinos or light grey wool pants.
      OCBD or tattersall shirt
      Shawl collar cardigan or linen collarless cardigan
      “Beater” sport coat, leather jacket or chore coat if applicable
      Chukkas or loafers

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        #4
        This is a very general comment and it applies to everything I wear, regardless of casual, formal, or otherwise. Pay attention to fit. Too big or too small will not only be uncomfortable but will also look bad. I'll allow that "look bad" is subjective but, if you're on this site, you know we're about that look!

        Also, I'll second the thought about thinking of shoes first. Or, at least, give shoes at least as much thought as the rest of your outfit combined.

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          #5
          #1 - Fit. MediumTex covered it. Two guys wearing jeans and t-shirt. The first guy's jeans are frayed on the hem from stepping on too-long legs and his t-shirt is oversized with sleeves that hit his elbows. The second guy has fitted, but not tight jeans and t-shirt that follows his torso silhouette and sleeves that show a little bicep. They're wearing the same thing same, but which guy looks "smarter"?

          #2 - Shoes. Already covered.

          #3 - Accessories. A quality belt or tasteful watch can go a long way to elevating an outfit. Similarly, a gaudy watch or too much jewelry can severely detract from any otherwise clean and classy casual outfit.

          #4 - Materials. Quality fabrics and leathers always look better and "smarter" than lesser quality. File under "buy the best you can afford". Wearing seasonal fabrics - e.g. wool, flannel, corduroy in the cold weather and linen, seersucker, tropical-weight in the warm weather - provides subtle sophistication and a little differentiation from everybody else's "jeans and t-shirt" or "chinos and button down".

          #5 - Color. Now we're really getting next level. Wear colors that look good on you. You can go full "color wheel" and "seasons" analysis or just look in the mirror. Most guys wear a lot of blue and tan (khaki). I do too. Classic combo. Looks great. But if you can break away from the blue and tan a little, that's another element of subtle differentiation. Joe likes to talk about how gray is underutilized, so there's an otherwise "neutral" color that can spice up a casual outfit just enough to look a little "smarter". Green is another one, if you can pull it off. Also, consider that lighter colors visually widen your profile while darker colors visually slim your profile. I look much better in a black t-shirt than a white one. A really skinny guy might benefit from the white shirt.
          Last edited by tankerjohn; May 21, 2021, 02:42 PM.

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            #6
            I'll push back and say shoes are overrated. For casual clothing, if you have (a) one pair of loafers, mocs or desert boots (smooth leather or suede), and (b) one pair of simple sneakers (leather or canvas), you're set. Add some heavier boots if you live somewhere with snowy winters. Beyond that, no one will notice. If you love shoes, by all means get more, just know that it's solely for your enjoyment.

            Now, to apply this to my own life ...

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              #7
              Originally posted by facelessghost View Post
              I'll push back and say shoes are overrated. For casual clothing, if you have (a) one pair of loafers, mocs or desert boots (smooth leather or suede), and (b) one pair of simple sneakers (leather or canvas), you're set. Add some heavier boots if you live somewhere with snowy winters. Beyond that, no one will notice. If you love shoes, by all means get more, just know that it's solely for your enjoyment.

              Now, to apply this to my own life ...
              I think you're conflating quantity of shoes with quality of shoes. Having lots of shoes is overrated. Having good shoes is decidedly not. Enough guys out there are running around in old sneakers and squared-toe loafers and otherwise terrible shoes. Good footwear will definitely elevate a casual outfit. Your suggestion for a shoe "capsule wardrobe" is right on.

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