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How do you dress when doing yard work?

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    How do you dress when doing yard work?

    A bit of a funny post to get things going around the forum, but as the title states, do you believe that it's possible to stay dappered while fixing up your yard or garden?

    How do you dress for the occasion?

    #2
    Easy: hire someone to do it. But seriously, if I have to do anything outside, I just wear old clothes that have been "retired" from general use, so I don't care if they get dirty or otherwise damaged. If you're doing actual labor, then appearance is not a concern. My neighbors certainly don't care what I'm wearing, and I'm certainly not concerned with impressing them.

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      #3
      I've been doing remodeling work for the last five months as well as yard work. I wear old jeans. I have a pair Levi's 501 and an old pair of Lucky jeans--they are at least 15-20 years old. I have a bunch of old beater polo, Henley, and t-shirts I also wear--I layer them when it's a bit colder, but in So. Cal., that's not much of a problem.

      Shoes--And a pair of super comfortable Wolf & Sheppard loafers I got on sale for $125 and immediately started beating the hell out of them (as much as I've dissed W&S at full price--they are a great deal at 50% or more off). Or my Frye suede Chelsea boots I got on sale for about $80 and have now beat the hell out of them.

      As you can tell, I don't try to stay dappered--I'm a slob when doing crap work--I get paint, chalk, glue, and other crap on my clothes and shoes when I'm working. I rip them up.

      I even get blood on them sometimes. I bleed pretty easily.

      WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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        #4
        Old jeans and a t-shirt, maybe an old sweatshirt if it's chilly, and old work shoes from my restaurant server days. Now, I keep those shoes polished (which is why they've lasted this long), but given there's a good chance the clothes are going to get ruined I don't worry about appearances.

        The trick is to start with stylish items. Old or not, a well-fitted article of clothing will generally still be flattering, rather like a cheap suit still looks good if properly tailored. A nice outfit of old pieces is the difference between looking well-worn and rugged versus scruffy and sloppy.

        Not buying clothes for dirty work (that's light enough not to need heavy-duty gear) is doubtless influenced by my parents. My dad's idea of yard wear was his old golf shirts and trousers; man never owned a pair of sweatpants in his life.

        The only real exception I can see is outerwear, but not living on a farm I generally don't need to be working outside in significant rain or snow and can wait for clearer weather. Well, other than shovelling snow, but then I'm not getting dirty so preserving my outerwear isn't a concern.
        Last edited by Galcobar; April 8, 2021, 12:57 PM.

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          #5
          Old clothes. Yard work is not the time to care about appearance.

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            #6
            old navy jeans, AE sturgis 2.0 boots, and a t-shirt or hoodie as weather dictates.
            https://www.professorhorseyhead.com

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              #7
              Jeans (same Levis I always wear), Huckberry Rhodes boots, flannel shirt (or tshirt if it's really hot), Orvis barn coat if it's cold. Good workwear has a place in regular wardrobe, and when you need to do work outside, you can wear stuff that's tough and well-fitting.

              Work gloves! Any time I'm swinging a hammer, using a saw, shoveling, etc, good to have gloves, no matter the weather. Just the $10 mechanic's gloves at the big box hardware store.

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                #8
                Same as pretty much everyone else, it seems. Old 501s (retired from general use because of small holes in the crotch); a retired t-shirt or flannel; and my now-beloved Blundstone 500s, which I scored at Sierra [formerly Trading Post] for $7. The last I’d actually be willing to spend on—comfortable beater boots that I can quickly slip off to run inside (or hose off after use) are worth having. Other than that, my yard work clothes were all saved from the donation bin and kept specifically for dirty work.

                As someone else mentioned, if your primary wardrobe gets more stylish, it will eventually trickle down to your yard work clothes. But don’t go buy clothes for the purpose of looking good doing yard work. That’s a bridge too far for most of us.

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                  #9
                  i forgot sometimes i wear old DCU pants from a short stint in Kuwait several years back. that's if it's really warm outside, they're quite comfy on a hot day surprisingly, keep my legs a gorgeous stark white for blinding the folks at the local pool.
                  https://www.professorhorseyhead.com

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                    #10
                    Old clothes. Old jeans that I no longer care about. Free T-shirts that have come my way through various functions. Definitely not dappered.

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                      #11
                      I don't think dapper is about being fancy and dandy. I believe in dressing for the occasion, and for all occasions it starts with clothes that fit well.Perfectly fitted jeans and t-shirt are more dapper than an old saggy polo.

                      I have some Gap jeans that fit me great and a selection of decent t-shirts that are neither tight nor sloppy (I'm a SMedium, so hard to fit well) which, when worn with a pair of Vans or NB sneakers that aren't all beat up, present what I think is a dapper yard work look.

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                        #12
                        I am definitely NOT dappered while doing yard work, but don't really care. For that matter, if I need to dash out to Home Depot in the middle of a project, I don't bother dappering up for that either. I do like functional clothing like shirts with a lot of pockets and bib overalls with a lot of pockets. Did I mention I like a lot of pockets when I'm doing jobs around the house? Oh, my only other rule of thumb is to never mow or weedwack in shoes I don't want to turn green.

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                          #13
                          Depends on what time of day it is. I have a pair of chinos - well technically I guess you can call them cargo pants because they have one low profile cargo pocket on one of the legs but they have articulated, reinforced knees. They're olive drab and I used to wear them casually but last summer was wearing them while putting down some mulch...you know how mulch comes in different colors? Well they only had black mulch and what I didn't realize is that stuff permanently stains. So now I have grey streaks and blotches all over those pants, so that's what I wear when doing yard work. I usually wear a beater (i.e. too worn out to otherwise wear) t shirt - either long or short sleeved depending on what I'm doing and how hot it is. Sometimes a beater button up shirt of some sort. Footwear is either a pair of Thorogood work boots (moc toe wedge sole) or an old pair of sneakers. If it's after 6, I wear a tux because...
                          “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

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                            #14
                            All of the best fades over at Heddels are submitter by people who do actual work in them. Might as well break in your expensive rigid jeans, new work boots, belts, etc., with actual work...
                            Mark

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by motosacto View Post
                              All of the best fades over at Heddels are submitter by people who do actual work in them. Might as well break in your expensive rigid jeans, new work boots, belts, etc., with actual work...
                              Yeah, that's true to an extent. I agree that "work wear" looks better with some wear and tear and shouldn't be treated like a delicate mohair suit. But personally, I exercise discretion to avoid trashing my clothes that I want to wear in public, even if my fades aren't quite as "sick" as they could be. See mark4's post above. There's "working" in your jeans, boots, etc. And then there's working that involves ripping, staining, sweating, abrasion, mud, grease, rocks, etc. Plus, there are purely functional considerations that aren't particularly stylish, like my preference for bibs.

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