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hiking shoes for AE dress shoe dress boot guy.

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    hiking shoes for AE dress shoe dress boot guy.

    help! all i own are AE dress boots, AE dress shoes I probably own 20 pairs of those and a pair of Converse Allstars.

    a friend i've been seeing lately had plans for us to go on 'hikes' of beginner to intermediate levels. Probably not climbing any mountains, but probably going out 10 miles or so and walking around and seeing a lot of neat stuff on mixed terrain.

    AND they've gotta be in a WIDE sizes. maybe under $200 if possible.

    halp me dappered wan kenobi! you're my only hope!
    Last edited by evanparker; January 11, 2021, 09:48 AM.

    #2
    I think that i don't know anything about the hiking footwears at all, but i did like the look of these NB shoes? no idea what they do or don't do well? i'm suspicious that maybe they look like sneakers?




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      #3
      Those are probably fine.

      Contrary to what many people seem to think, hiking shoes don't need to do much. First, they need to stop your feet from getting poked by stuff, and literally any modern shoe (including Chucks, AEs, etc.) will do an adequate job of that. Next, they need to provide traction. But unless you're hiking in muddy, snowy, icy, or maybe dusty terrain, pretty much any sneaker will do an adequate job of that. I do a lot of mountain running, and except for snowy conditions and steep, loose terrain, my favorite shoe is are the Adidas Adios 3 (long discontinued, but I still have one pair). The adios was designed as a lightweight road marathon shoe, but it's more than adequate for the trails.

      Since you're here, I assume you're also concerned about style. Honestly, for what you're talking about, just go find any classic-style runner with a rubber sole that (a) looks good, and (b) feels good. That's all you need. Since you have a wide foot, New Balance is probably your best bet. If you decide to go with a more technical option, Hoka should offer some wide options, both trail runners and hiking boots.
      Last edited by facelessghost; January 11, 2021, 11:15 AM. Reason: Edit -- you should be able to find something that will suit you for closer to $50-75.

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        #4
        I advise Danner for classic made in America leather hiking boots.

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          #5
          I wore Merrells for my college summer job at a landscaping company. I liked that they were moderately waterproof and came in wide sizes. They're not particularly stylish but I wouldn't worry too much about that. Hiking strikes me as a situations where function trumps form.

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            #6
            Originally posted by ryn View Post
            I advise Danner for classic made in America leather hiking boots.
            This!

            or maybe Red Wing’s Irish Setter line.

            Comment


              #7
              I am on the opposite side of the spectrum. I have only ever bought two dress boots in my life, unless we are counting desert boots. I spend money on outdoor gear and clothes. For hiking, three things to consider up front are how strong are your ankles, water proof or none water proof, and how’s your foot arch. I don’t have weak ankles so I wear hiking shoes when not doing long trecks or too crazy of terrain as a shoes that can do both trail running and hiking is a good versatile shoe. I usually do water proof shoes as you just never know but warning you do loss breathability. Arch plays it’s part for example My feet are close to flat so I can’t do Keens but work love Merrells.

              I currently wear the Merell MQM low hiking shoes because I want light weight living in the desert. I would also agree with Tankerjohn and look into Redwing Irsh Setter Line. I have a pair from that line and they are amazing with good leather that have stopped cactus needles for me.They also have colors close to the Iron Ranger colors so double win for me. I stay away from any type of sued in footwear for hiking. I don’t find it durable and have had a pair get destroyed by big spray. Keen and Salmon are good brands and LL Been hides decent boots on their sight.
              Last edited by jvargas; January 11, 2021, 11:38 PM.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by facelessghost View Post
                Those are probably fine.

                Contrary to what many people seem to think, hiking shoes don't need to do much. First, they need to stop your feet from getting poked by stuff, and literally any modern shoe (including Chucks, AEs, etc.) will do an adequate job of that. Next, they need to provide traction. But unless you're hiking in muddy, snowy, icy, or maybe dusty terrain, pretty much any sneaker will do an adequate job of that. I do a lot of mountain running, and except for snowy conditions and steep, loose terrain, my favorite shoe is are the Adidas Adios 3 (long discontinued, but I still have one pair). The adios was designed as a lightweight road marathon shoe, but it's more than adequate for the trails.

                Since you're here, I assume you're also concerned about style. Honestly, for what you're talking about, just go find any classic-style runner with a rubber sole that (a) looks good, and (b) feels good. That's all you need. Since you have a wide foot, New Balance is probably your best bet. If you decide to go with a more technical option, Hoka should offer some wide options, both trail runners and hiking boots.
                Im going to contest this a little. I am a firm believer that gear snobs have overhyped the need for some things in hiking but I cant imagine hiking in my chucks. Rocks and roots in georgia are EXHAUSTING on your feet after a few miles without a half decent footbed. Also, this has a lot to do with defining what a hike is to you. a well worn path in the woods for a few miles is fun and I have done that in just about any footwear. I hit 18 miles in a day on some hike though and really dont bother with under 6 much. anything under 6 is a walk in the woods to me.

                For my "walk in the woods" trips, I just have a pair of Merrell alpine sneaker and a pair of Cole Haan Danner wanabees. I also keep a pair of Asic running shoes int he jeep for impromptu stuff. All are perfectly fine. OP, those new balance would be perfectly fine.



                Originally posted by jvargas View Post
                I am on the opposite side of the spectrum. I have only ever bought two dress boots in my life, unless we are counting desert boots. I spend money on outdoor gear and clothes. For hiking, three things to consider up front are how strong are your ankles, water proof or none water proof, and how’s your foot arch. I don’t have weak ankles so I wear hiking shoes when not doing long trecks or too crazy of terrain as a shoes that can do both trail running and hiking is a good versatile shoe. I usually do water proof shoes as you just never know but warning you do loss breathability. Arch plays it’s part for example My feet are close to flat so I can’t do Keens but work love Merrells.

                I currently wear the Merell MQM low hiking shoes because I want light weight living in the desert. I would also agree with Tankerjohn and look into Redwing Irsh Setter Line. I have a pair from that line and they are amazing with good leather that have stopped cactus needles for me.They also have colors close to the Iron Ranger colors so double win for me. I stay away from any type of sued in footwear for hiking. I don’t find it durable and have had a pair get destroyed by big spray. Keen and Salmon are good brands and LL Been hides decent boots on their sight.
                this is always so fun...everyone has different preferences. Ankle support is starting to become a misnomer. I have weak ankles and dont do boots. There is a growing theory that boots dont keep you from rolling your ankle, they just disperse the stress up your leg where it ISNT supposed to go. over time it leads to shin splints etc. also increases muscle issues int he lower leg. I do mostly low tops and find it lets me receiver from a slip or roll faster. the weight reduction also helps my ankles. I wear boots when I might want to pad my ankles from rock scrapes, am worried about snakes, or to keep mud out. I dont lace them tight though. they are ankle pads basically lol.

                I a big fan of merrell too because I know they fit me. I can get the same size in almost any merrell product and it doesnt need breakin. thats just my foot shape. Altra too but they arent very "dappered". I tried on every brand at REI and Runners world and La Sportiva, Merrell, and Vasque were my bet bets. OP...take a trip down and check them out.


                some brands I have found good dappered options with...Danner, Eastland, Timberland, Hi Tec, Merrell, Sorel (try them on, a lot of variance).

                Comment


                  #9
                  oh, and I dont like waterproof for the most part. my feet sweat way more and for rainy hikes, your feet are still going to get wet. but this may be past the scope of this application. I do have waterproof for my morning strolls in the park to keep my shoes from being soaked from dew. but if I am doing a multi day hike or hiking in weather, I just do my quick drying trail runners and merino socks. they are still comfortable when soaked and dry overnight. a lot of waterproof stuff doesnt.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    There is going to be no one size fits all with hiking boots, it depends on the weather, but also the type of hiking.

                    Factors to look at:

                    Fit - very important Padding - more padding also means warmer
                    Waterproofing
                    Profile
                    Hardness

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'd try on several brands if you can - I hike in Oboz but that's just because I tried on a bunch of different brands and they fit my feet the best. Not sure if they make wide sizes though. I think Vasque does both D and wide widths (looks above like Merrell does too) and I would bet that Danner also does. All are legit hiking boot manufacturers. Other reputable brands include La Sportiva, Salomon, Lowa, and Asolo. That's not an exhaustive list. In the midwest, where the terrain isn't rocky and not mountainous either a regular athletic shoe would do, but if there are puddles or really marshy mud patches a boot is nice because you're less likely to get water pouring into the top, and waterproof is obviously nice in that situation. If you'll be hiking the Cascades, Sierra, Appalachians, or Rockies I think a hiking boot would be best - running shoe soles are optimized for traction on asphalt and concrete. One would think that kind of sole would be fine on natural rock too, and it does OK, but hiking boot soles definitely grip better on natural rock (and worse on concrete). That extra traction can be nice on steep sections of trail. Also they provide more support and more protection from jagged rock surfaces. I realize going into a brick and mortar store to try on boots right now is kind of dicey but REI has a pretty amazing return policy so you could order a couple pair and return the ones that don't fit.

                      Also, a word on fit...I'm usually a size 8 in dress shoes but my hiking boots (and running shoe) size is generally a 9. You want some room between the end of your toes and the front of the boot. If your toes are jammed into the front of the boot on long downhills you'll wind up with tender toes and can even get blisters forming on the front of your toes, and in the worst case scenario your toenail will blacken and fall off. That's probably not going to happen unless you are backpacking with a several day load and really got shoes that are way too small, but the blister thing can happen even if they're not super-short.
                      “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by mark4 View Post
                        I'd try on several brands if you can - I hike in Oboz but that's just because I tried on a bunch of different brands and they fit my feet the best.
                        Dude! Are you the guy in last week’s Put This On comic?! https://putthison.com/style-fashion-...-hiking-boots/ (The first frame is by far the funniest part)

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I am totally with you on hot feat and waterproofing making them sweat. I have stopped buying waterproof anything since I moved away from the Appalachians. Your point about boots and changing ankle structure makes sense, though I haven’t looked into it my self. Though I will say, I think boots are some what mental comfort, for those use to them. Just not having to worry about snakes, all the things that stab, and other critters.

                          Back to offering advice, one thing I forgot to mention is go to merrells, keen, obez, or what ever brand your like actual
                          sight. Merrell, for a example, offers a lot more on their sight then ever is at REI.
                          I would also recommend the Merrell Alpine sneaker, with a caveat, as they are good for easier terrain not really rough ground. The alpine sneakers are go on sale from time to time at DSW.
                          If you are look for lots of grip and durability any shoe or boot with a vibram soles will be great.


                          Originally posted by idvsego View Post
                          oh, and I dont like waterproof for the most part. my feet sweat way more and for rainy hikes, your feet are still going to get wet. but this may be past the scope of this application. I do have waterproof for my morning strolls in the park to keep my shoes from being soaked from dew. but if I am doing a multi day hike or hiking in weather, I just do my quick drying trail runners and merino socks. they are still comfortable when soaked and dry overnight. a lot of waterproof stuff doesnt.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Something like the Merrell Ontario line or Sugarbush has been on my radar.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I think if you're that into American-made heritage dress shoes/boots, I echo the other sentiments about Danner above. Their boots look great, they have a wide variety of hiking shoes and boots (ranging from lightweight shoes to pretty heavy duty, waterproof insulated boots). Admittedly, NOT all of their shoes are made in the USA, and in this case, many of their hiking boots are not, but they look fantastic none the less, and have the heritage and legacy of being great, long-lasting footwear: https://www.danner.com/men/hike?sortId=product-family

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