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    Best Joggers/Pants for Volleyball/Dinner Night

    On Volleyball nights, we go to bars/restaurants before or after. What would be the ideal joggers and/or pants that work for both? What type of material should I look for?

    I want to be able to run/move comfortably for Volleyball but still look somewhat classy for restaurant.

    #2
    I recommend adidas Originals adventure joggers with contrast stitch in black. I think it comfortable and very classy. I think you may want to give it a try

    Comment


      #3
      Are you talking about in the future? Or now? In the future, I'd recommend the BR Core Temp chinos (rolled up for the game, rolled back down with a fresh polo post game)

      If it's now? I can't fathom doing either of those activities during a global pandemic (that's on the rise pretty much everywhere) that has killed hundreds of thousands of people. I usually go with "you do you" but in this case, "you do you" could literally kill people. People like grandma or grandpa, a favorite aunt or uncle, even a loved parent.

      I know we're all (really really really) tired of this, but we really need to hold the line as much as possible as a species.

      rt.live
      ​​​​​​​

      Rant Over.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Alex.C View Post
        Are you talking about in the future? Or now? In the future, I'd recommend the BR Core Temp chinos (rolled up for the game, rolled back down with a fresh polo post game)

        If it's now? I can't fathom doing either of those activities during a global pandemic (that's on the rise pretty much everywhere) that has killed hundreds of thousands of people. I usually go with "you do you" but in this case, "you do you" could literally kill people. People like grandma or grandpa, a favorite aunt or uncle, even a loved parent.

        I know we're all (really really really) tired of this, but we really need to hold the line as much as possible as a species.

        rt.live

        Rant Over.
        If you want to stay home, you should do so. But many are others are choosing to analyze the risks and have decided not live in fear of a virus with a 99% survival rate for the vast majority of the population.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post

          If you want to stay home, you should do so. But many are others are choosing to analyze the risks and have decided not live in fear of a virus with a 99% survival rate for the vast majority of the population.
          By that logic, one should throw out all the safety equipment and laws around driving which only kills around 30,000 Americans per year, or about one-tenth of what this virus has managed so far (and really, the pandemic didn't get going until April after travellers flooded back from Europe).

          Or to measure it another way, in a few months this disease has killed more Americans than every war in the last 75 years combined. For that matter, if the current daily number of deaths remains steady (and it won't, deaths follow rising infection numbers) it'll shortly be more deadly than all those wars plus World War One.

          Or to put it a third way, only the US Civil War killed a higher percentage of Americans than the one per cent you cite, and it took five years to reach that 2.1 per cent.

          Moreover, the guesstimated 1 per cent fatality rate assumes every patient has access to whatever level of medical intervention is required. The death rate skyrockets once hospitals are overwhelmed, as proven by Italy, Brazil, New York, Iran, etc. Mass graves visible on satellite imagery and bodies piled in refrigerator trucks are not signs of a system that's underwhelmed

          Thus the idea of bending the curve, to keep infection rates at levels the medical infrastructure can handle. Multiple American states are already nearing the breaking point, with even those administrations who've done their best to downplay the pandemic now admitting they don't have enough beds or personnel to cope.

          Most notably, it's not just about you and your risk, or me and my risk. It's about inflicting that risk on others. We as a society have made drunk driving illegal, despite such laws infringing upon an individual's rights, because the risk it creates for other people is not a reasonable price to pay.

          There's a reason why epidemiologists, ICU nurses and funeral directors are not the ones protesting attempts to limit the death toll.

          It is almost amusing that the same people who were yelling about "death panels" during the Affordable Care Act debates are now doing their level best to create a situation where rationing of medical care would actually require deciding who gets a chance to live.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Galcobar View Post

            By that logic, one should throw out all the safety equipment and laws around driving which only kills around 30,000 Americans per year, or about one-tenth of what this virus has managed so far (and really, the pandemic didn't get going until April after travellers flooded back from Europe).

            Or to measure it another way, in a few months this disease has killed more Americans than every war in the last 75 years combined. For that matter, if the current daily number of deaths remains steady (and it won't, deaths follow rising infection numbers) it'll shortly be more deadly than all those wars plus World War One.

            Or to put it a third way, only the US Civil War killed a higher percentage of Americans than the one per cent you cite, and it took five years to reach that 2.1 per cent.

            Moreover, the guesstimated 1 per cent fatality rate assumes every patient has access to whatever level of medical intervention is required. The death rate skyrockets once hospitals are overwhelmed, as proven by Italy, Brazil, New York, Iran, etc. Mass graves visible on satellite imagery and bodies piled in refrigerator trucks are not signs of a system that's underwhelmed

            Thus the idea of bending the curve, to keep infection rates at levels the medical infrastructure can handle. Multiple American states are already nearing the breaking point, with even those administrations who've done their best to downplay the pandemic now admitting they don't have enough beds or personnel to cope.

            Most notably, it's not just about you and your risk, or me and my risk. It's about inflicting that risk on others. We as a society have made drunk driving illegal, despite such laws infringing upon an individual's rights, because the risk it creates for other people is not a reasonable price to pay.

            There's a reason why epidemiologists, ICU nurses and funeral directors are not the ones protesting attempts to limit the death toll.

            It is almost amusing that the same people who were yelling about "death panels" during the Affordable Care Act debates are now doing their level best to create a situation where rationing of medical care would actually require deciding who gets a chance to live.
            Okay, boomer.

            Comment


              #7
              Come on lads, back on topic here. Thank you.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Galcobar View Post

                By that logic, one should throw out all the safety equipment and laws around driving which only kills around 30,000 Americans per year, or about one-tenth of what this virus has managed so far (and really, the pandemic didn't get going until April after travellers flooded back from Europe).

                Or to measure it another way, in a few months this disease has killed more Americans than every war in the last 75 years combined. For that matter, if the current daily number of deaths remains steady (and it won't, deaths follow rising infection numbers) it'll shortly be more deadly than all those wars plus World War One.

                Or to put it a third way, only the US Civil War killed a higher percentage of Americans than the one per cent you cite, and it took five years to reach that 2.1 per cent.

                Moreover, the guesstimated 1 per cent fatality rate assumes every patient has access to whatever level of medical intervention is required. The death rate skyrockets once hospitals are overwhelmed, as proven by Italy, Brazil, New York, Iran, etc. Mass graves visible on satellite imagery and bodies piled in refrigerator trucks are not signs of a system that's underwhelmed

                Thus the idea of bending the curve, to keep infection rates at levels the medical infrastructure can handle. Multiple American states are already nearing the breaking point, with even those administrations who've done their best to downplay the pandemic now admitting they don't have enough beds or personnel to cope.

                Most notably, it's not just about you and your risk, or me and my risk. It's about inflicting that risk on others. We as a society have made drunk driving illegal, despite such laws infringing upon an individual's rights, because the risk it creates for other people is not a reasonable price to pay.

                There's a reason why epidemiologists, ICU nurses and funeral directors are not the ones protesting attempts to limit the death toll.

                It is almost amusing that the same people who were yelling about "death panels" during the Affordable Care Act debates are now doing their level best to create a situation where rationing of medical care would actually require deciding who gets a chance to live.
                Seriously. My wife works in health care. Like...they're at the breaking point because of the attitudes like this. And it's getting worse. If you want to run around and take risks, fine, so long as you live or die at home without medical care. Have the courage of your convictions. Save those ICU berths for people that are making an effort to stay safe - like front line health care workers - but have the misfortune to get infected anyway. Because, in a lot of the country we're at the point where people will have to be denied care, and if you decide to not take precautions you should let others have access to those resources. So, if you have trouble breathing garryowen47, please don't show up at the ICU. Just get over it at home, or gasp out your last at home. Because what is happening is if guys with garryowen's attitude show up at the hospital and take the last of the remaining ICU berths, and then some front line health care worker with a severe case is going to be denied care because they're out of beds. And that totally fucking sucks IMO.
                “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

                Comment


                  #9
                  That’s exactly the risk I’ve calculated based on the science. For the overwhelming majority of the population, this virus is nothing more than a bad cold. If you’re elderly or have preexisting conditions, then your risk calculus will vary. My risk calculation is that I’ve probably already had or been exposed to it but even if I did contract it, the symptoms will be mild. That’s he case for the vast majority of the population. So yes, I will frequent bars with friends, visit family for the holidays, and heck, play volleyball if I want to.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    While it would depend on the bar / restaurant and how sweaty you get playing volleyball, the Uniqlo Dry Stretch Sweatpants may work. Cotton / poly blend, not baggy, seem durable, zippered pockets = security while working out, draw string is quality, looks *much* nicer than traditional cotton sweats without looking techy / plastic. Spouse approved. They don't breathe well, however, so someone who runs hot and sweats a lot, they may not work great for both settings. They also feel plasticky / stiff at first but after a few wears and washing machine cycles, they've become extremely comfortable (wearing them now). Uniqlo makes joggers (EZY slim fit) as well, but the belt loops combined with the elastic ankle openings remind me of mullets or El Caminos (or to eliminate the pleasant whiff of classic cars- the Chevy SSR, a true abomination). Uniqlo also, however, offers the DRY-EX Ultra Stretch Active Pants which would be an upgrade in appearance from the sweatpants- that might be the sweet spot particularly if you're going to more upscale bistros. All are reasonably priced.

                    Also have a pair of Old Navy joggers (cotton / poly blend). Nice slim fit, beyond comfortable, very light, cheap, and was shocked to see them featured on this website awhile back. That said, they do degrade with time, and probably would only be fit for bars/restaurants if you live in Texas outside of Dallas.

                    Have a pair of Prana hemp pants in a jogger style on sale last year... those don't do anything well, and they shed. Maybe Prana makes better pants, but hard to justify spending 3-4x that of Uniqlo.

                    Interested if anyone has experience with American Giant, Pistol Lake or Mack Weldon. They all seem exorbitantly priced, but if they're more durable they may be a good deal. Also like the ethos and commitment to US manufacturing of AG and PL, but maybe that's marketing hype.

                    P.S. I also work in health care... and while I agree with mark4 and the like... I come to a clothing forum to get away from my job.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post

                      Okay, boomer.
                      He has to be a boomer to believe in science and have common sense?

                      Ok, Stuart Smalley.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post
                        That’s exactly the risk I’ve calculated based on the science. For the overwhelming majority of the population, this virus is nothing more than a bad cold. If you’re elderly or have preexisting conditions, then your risk calculus will vary. My risk calculation is that I’ve probably already had or been exposed to it but even if I did contract it, the symptoms will be mild. That’s he case for the vast majority of the population. So yes, I will frequent bars with friends, visit family for the holidays, and heck, play volleyball if I want to.
                        This is nonsense. It not about your personal risk tolerance. Its the risk you pose to others if you contract the virus and are asymptomatic. Also, the notion that only the elderly or people with pre-existing conditions get sick or die is complete bunk. Many people that contract COVID have severe and lasting symptoms. One of my friend's lung collapsed after contracting the virus. Another friend of mine was in the ICU for two weeks and is now relearning how to walk. Both were young, in good physical shape and had no prior history of illness.

                        I also work in healthcare. I'm not a clinician but I do work with healthcare providers on a daily basis. A doctor I worked with died earlier this year from the disease. He was middle aged and had a family. He most likely contracted the virus at work. That's what makes it so frustrating to hear you say its not a big deal because it has a 99% survival rate. When millions of people contract the virus a 1% fatality rate is not insignificant. Those are people that lost their lives from something that could've been prevented.

                        mark4 is right. Hospitals are at their breaking point. We're almost at capacity. We are at the point of diverting resources from other departments to take care of COVID patients. That means people with other health conditions are not being seen. It's not a good situation and things are only getting worse. We just ask that people be responsible and think of others.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          The mortality rate is literally comparable to the flu. Heck, it’s arguably less deadly than the flu if you factor asymptotic carriers. The average age of death from COVID is higher than the average life expectancy. Your anecdotes are not data. The data says the risk of death or severe illness is minimal. Given that data, I’m not living my life in irrational fear. You can do so if you want to. Otherwise, the rise in deaths from suicide, drug use, untreated health conditions and depression is worse than the cure of indefinite lockdowns that you’re suggesting.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The mortality rate is not literally comparable to the flu. It's far worse. The latest peer reviewed study released by the CDC showed a mortality rate of 7.6% with data from August. The rate of infection has gone up since then. Last week the mortality rate of hospitalized patients was ~11%. The week before it was ~15%. The flu rarely ever reaches 2% for either of those statistic. Its also far more infectious than the flu which means more people get it and ultimately more people get sick or die. Hospitals and ICUs are packed. We are literally overflowing into field hospitals and turning away other patients. The risk of severe illness is not minimal. You also continue to ignore the fact that people that survive often have lingering health issues. No one is arguing that the other problems caused by lockdowns aren't also a problem. But none of those are infectious. You can't get them from merely having prolonged exposure to someone. That's the whole point of the COVID restrictions. Mitigate the spread from asymptotic carriers. You many not get sick but someone else might not be so luck. You don't have to live in fear. Just take precautions to protect your fellow citizens. Its not an unreasonable thing to ask. We are so, so close to being on the other side of this but things are only going to get worse before they get better if we continue with this self-serving attitude.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              We’re almost 9months into this and still there are uninformed people thinking they are informed and comparing this to the flu. No wonder the USAs response has been so terrible.

                              Garry you’re probably a nice person but drastically uninformed and touting information as informed. That’s dangerous.

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