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Anyone else forgotten how to dress?

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    #16
    Originally posted by mark4 View Post
    I use my former commuting time to get exercise, then usually take the dog for a walk around lunch break time, and then in the afternoon I again get exercise when I would have been commuting.
    At the beginning of summer I thought, "What should I do with the extra time in my day I don't spend commuting?" So I started doing a run on weekday mornings, then fixing myself a reasonable breakfast--neither of which I used to bother with. My weight hasn't changed (those breakfasts :-), but I'm probably in a little better shape, and I like the new routine.

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      #17
      I ended up working from home from March to mid May when I was furloughed. During that time, it was 100% comfy attire, but for me, that's jeans or shorts and a tee.

      After joining a new company, I'm back to polos and chinos. It did take a few days to get back into the cycle, but it's worth it IMO.

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        #18
        I've been working from home since March (like pretty much everyone else) and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Over the summer, the only thing that really changed was that I wore jeans instead of chinos most days, but I still wore polos almost every day. In the cooler months (early days and again now), I usually dont bother putting on some sort of button down shirt, like I would if I was going into the office. I'm usually wearing a henley or a sweater of some sort. I think I've put on a button down shirt 3-4 times since March, and it's really only been because I was doing some virtual interviews with folks. And rather than throwing a blazer on in the cooler weather, I've picked up a couple more cardigan or other sweaters to layer up with at home.

        To other people's point, my AE's have gotten absolutely no wear since the start. I barely even wear shoes most days, unless I need to run outside to do something in the yard or a quick run to the store. I was on the verge of sending my Strands and McAllisters in for resoling back in January. I guess I'll just leave that on hold for the time being. Although, this could also be the perfect time to do it since they would never be "out of my rotation" while they are off for service.

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          #19
          I am wondering how long it will take for me to rejoin back in. I wore suits everyday.

          From March until July I was at home. Almost every video call during that time was camera off since the federal individuals did that and we took their lead.

          Come July I got offered a great new job but it's 100% telework since it's not feasible to fly and visit clients since all of them are remote. For July through September it was mostly shorts, and t-shirts given how hot and humid DC is. I'd throw on a button down if a zoom call but not always.

          Now I wear a button down most days for warmth but any of my nicer stuff would just be off putting to the people I'm interacting with. Many of which don't use video every time.

          My extra commute time has come in terms of extra work time doing 10-11 hour days with the extra time. I don't know when I will wear a suit again. I wore a blazer for a friends wedding ceremony but we didn't feel comfortable staying after the ceremony. My dress shoes hardly see any where. I've about worn out my Asics for the hopefully daily walks to daycare to pickup my son.

          I'm ready for this to end but the impacts are going to be long term.

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            #20
            I blame the 90s for this "dress laziness" not just the unfortunate Covid situation we are going through. Even the 'play clothes" jeans and a tee shirts became baggy, ripped jeans and flannel shirts in 80 degree weather. Then we had casual Friday which turned into casual every day. As you could tell, I'm probably a lot older than most of you (51) and started working at a Fortune 500 company at the age of 20 in 1989. We were required to wear sport jackets and ties( I always wore a suit because I don't like the sport jacket/different color pant look and business casual doesn't do it for me). I had a co-worker who was 35 at the time and he took me under his wing, taught me what he knew and I've loved suits forever. As I made more money, you get to have fun with bespoke and learn about different materials and accessories. Of course, you are all welcome to wear what you want and I've learned about many new differences in clothing on this site. I still don't think the 2 button,100% wool suit will ever go away. In fact, some of these companies seem to try and make some comfortable dress clothes. In fact, once of the biggest improvements I have seen is the slim fit dress shirt. I laugh when I watch a 90s show and see how the dress are tucked in and they looked like they were just stuffed into his pants. Also, I noticed going back to my working days, as a 20-30 year old in a suit, I got treated with much more respect than some of my co-workers(many times, I was asked If I was the manager when the casual dresser was the manager(he wasn't much older than I). That being said, I believe nothing beats a well put together suit with a strut down the street that exudes confidence. Great topic people and stay safe.
            Last edited by joekono; November 17, 2020, 01:13 AM.

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              #21
              I'm a psychologist w/in a large medical center. Since April I have been in scrubs/mask/face shield everyday. Most day my dress attire used to be blazer, dress shirt and chinos/slacks. I'd wear a suit 1x a week for department heads meetings. But now its nothing been blue scrub, a long sleeve shirt, and hospital approved fleece jacket (which I swore I would never wear). But due to nature of the my work (health psychologist, oversee ER/inpatient, serve as BH provider for COVID-19 ICU), I still see 75% of my patients face to face, which ends up being 20+ face to face appts per day. So I happy to wear clothes that hospital deep cleans everyday. At least, they give us some degree of optionality regarding scrub fit//style and fleece.

              ​​​​​My wife and I both have jobs which require we work with vulnerable populations, so we are strict about social distancing in our home. So we have no really opportunity to wear nice clothes. There is only one family with whom we socialize (I work with wife and her husband works remotely. We both 3 y/o's who attend the same daycare class). So if they come over, I may wear a OCDB. But I haven't worn a blazer in over 6 months,

              ​​​​​One change I see coming from COVID is more medical providers will switch to scrubs/masks permanently . The larger gov't agency I work for already has release policies mandating scrubs usage for any employee who interacts with for than 3 patients a day is mandated to wear scrubs/mask. They have made it very clear this policy is unlikely to go away when/if COVID states abating. Since enforcing the policy, sick days used by providers have actually decreased even while the pandemic rages on. Y​et even more evidence that masks , social distancing, and cleanliness vastly reduce transmission of COVID-19 and other viruses.

              Looking at my closet full of nice suits/blazer, Allen Edmond dress shoes, etc; I can't help to a be a little sad that I likely will rarely wear them in the future.


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                #22
                Originally posted by somaticmarker1 View Post
                Since enforcing the policy, sick days used by providers have actually decreased even while the pandemic rages on. Y​et even more evidence that masks , social distancing, and cleanliness vastly reduce transmission of COVID-19 and other viruses.
                Considering how poorly hospital personnel, especially doctors, score when externally graded on adherence to hand-washing and other personal/clothing hygiene, I'm not surprised that there's less employees off sick when such policies are actively enforced and peer pressure is applied. Something as simple as bare forearms have long been known to reduce transmission, since gloves only cover the hand. Maybe we can get it to the point where hospitals are not actively dangerous for the relatively healthy.

                Edit: it occurs to me that my comment may have come off as harsh, which was not intended. Rather, it was meant as somewhat hopeful, that we'll learn to expect better as a matter of routine like wearing seatbelts.
                Last edited by Galcobar; November 20, 2020, 06:42 PM.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by somaticmarker1 View Post
                  I'm a psychologist w/in a large medical center. Since April I have been in scrubs/mask/face shield everyday. Most day my dress attire used to be blazer, dress shirt and chinos/slacks. I'd wear a suit 1x a week for department heads meetings. But now its nothing been blue scrub, a long sleeve shirt, and hospital approved fleece jacket (which I swore I would never wear). But due to nature of the my work (health psychologist, oversee ER/inpatient, serve as BH provider for COVID-19 ICU), I still see 75% of my patients face to face, which ends up being 20+ face to face appts per day. So I happy to wear clothes that hospital deep cleans everyday. At least, they give us some degree of optionality regarding scrub fit//style and fleece.

                  ​​​​​My wife and I both have jobs which require we work with vulnerable populations, so we are strict about social distancing in our home. So we have no really opportunity to wear nice clothes. There is only one family with whom we socialize (I work with wife and her husband works remotely. We both 3 y/o's who attend the same daycare class). So if they come over, I may wear a OCDB. But I haven't worn a blazer in over 6 months,

                  ​​​​​One change I see coming from COVID is more medical providers will switch to scrubs/masks permanently . The larger gov't agency I work for already has release policies mandating scrubs usage for any employee who interacts with for than 3 patients a day is mandated to wear scrubs/mask. They have made it very clear this policy is unlikely to go away when/if COVID states abating. Since enforcing the policy, sick days used by providers have actually decreased even while the pandemic rages on. Y​et even more evidence that masks , social distancing, and cleanliness vastly reduce transmission of COVID-19 and other viruses.

                  Looking at my closet full of nice suits/blazer, Allen Edmond dress shoes, etc; I can't help to a be a little sad that I likely will rarely wear them in the future.

                  A: Thank you for doing an important job under very trying circumstances. My wife is in health care and sees patients live in the flesh in an out-patient setting twice a week. It's been an interesting and somewhat nerve wracking year.
                  B: I'm guessing the masks and hand washing are doing far, far more than the scrubs in preventing disease spread. So maybe you can get some of use out of that wardrobe of yours yet.
                  “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” – Mark Twain

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