Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shaving - Cartridges to Safety Razor?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    the untol truth of the 'switching to safety razor story' is ultimately that while you may in fact save some money, the learning curve on how exactly to shave is kind of long. I had been doing it for a few years now, and I still manage to cut my self pretty good at least twice every time I shave. even with all the experience i've collected on which way to go and when in the face hairs, i still manage to do something hasty or stupid almost all the time. It's hard. Definitley not something you want to do if you're in a hurry to go anywhere., like say late for work or a date.

    If I use the good shaving posture and other shaving tweaks i've applied to my face now with a regular modern disposable razor, i get a pretty perfect shave with no problems at all.

    so it's kind of meh. i think it's not for me maybe. I've actually just started cutting my face with full time 5 o clock shadow stubble with a cheapie electric i had got for my HAIR over the covidcation.. The pain of the razors on my face is something i no longer have top deal with :-D

    Comment


      #17
      With the Covids in full force, I am shaving only three days a week now (M/W/F). I find that I am able to get through mostly without nicking myself. And when I do nick myself, it's usually because I am using a blade that is past its life. So long as I am using a sharp/new blade, I'm pretty good. That said, I do from time to time come out of the bathroom thinking I'm all that and bag of chips only to have Mrs. DocDave tell me that I'm bleeding from my chin/jaw/cheek/whatever.

      I think I will always be nicking myself here and there, regardless of how long I shave with the safety razor. Just par for the course I suppose.

      Also, I have a couple of moles/birth marks on my face. For those areas I do use a cartridge razor as the cartridge razor doesn't tend to nick those parts of my face.

      Comment


        #18
        I switched to a safety razor probably.... 10 years ago? I used an electric before that and had issues with razor burn and irritation. I went on Ebay and found a nice 60s Gillette Fatboy, which is an adjustable safety razor. I like the adjustables because you can change how aggressive you want your shave to be. There are also a plethora of DE blades on the market, and believe it or not there is a difference between them. After trying a number of different blade I settled on Astra blades. They are cheap, sharp, and well behaved. Feather also makes excellent blades but they are also the sharpest blades on the market (or at least they used to be). For me, in addition to the better shave and lack of irritation, a big part of the appeal is the tradition. Shaving with a safety razor can become a bit of a ritual - something that your grandfathers likely did. It's a skill that was abandoned by many, and is now seeing resurgence. To shave well with a DE is to achieve a small measure of personal mastery and I find that endlessly appealing.

        That said, I've been rocking a beard for several years now, so my safety razor doesn't see the use it once did. Though I still use it for my neck and cheek touch-up.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Mr. Charles View Post
          I switched to a safety razor probably.... 10 years ago? I used an electric before that and had issues with razor burn and irritation. I went on Ebay and found a nice 60s Gillette Fatboy, which is an adjustable safety razor. I like the adjustables because you can change how aggressive you want your shave to be. There are also a plethora of DE blades on the market, and believe it or not there is a difference between them. After trying a number of different blade I settled on Astra blades. They are cheap, sharp, and well behaved. Feather also makes excellent blades but they are also the sharpest blades on the market (or at least they used to be). For me, in addition to the better shave and lack of irritation, a big part of the appeal is the tradition. Shaving with a safety razor can become a bit of a ritual - something that your grandfathers likely did. It's a skill that was abandoned by many, and is now seeing resurgence. To shave well with a DE is to achieve a small measure of personal mastery and I find that endlessly appealing.

          That said, I've been rocking a beard for several years now, so my safety razor doesn't see the use it once did. Though I still use it for my neck and cheek touch-up.
          Extremely well said! I definitely think that shaving with a double-edged razor falls into that category of skills that are not strictly necessary in the modern world, but nevertheless make one a better person, like driving a stick shift, sharpening a knife or navigating with a map instead of a GPS.

          P.S. I also really like Astras. Gillette Silver Blue is another great razor that is sharp, but smooth.

          Comment


            #20
            I bought two 1950's era Gillette safety razors. 200 Astra blades and a badger hair brush off amazon. I am going on 6 years with the same pack of blades. Rotate shaving soaps/creams. I use Taylor of Old Bond Sandalwood aftershave. Super cheap and I have found better than what I was doing in 2009/2010 for shaving with crappy disposables.

            Comment


              #21
              Gillette Silver Blue blade are my go-to blades as well. Same goes for Taylor of Old Bond street shaving cream.

              Reading about the Gillette safety razors though has me thinking I might see if I can track one down. Right now I have a Merkur long handled safety razor. Does that job well, but maybe something different for fun? If shaving can ever be considered fun that is.

              Comment


                #22
                I'm follicly-challenged so I shave both my head and face. I purchased a 100 razor variety/sample pack of blades similar to this, to help me get a feel for what blade works best for my skin. I use one brand for my head, another for my face. I purchased a Merkur razor, brush, bowl & stand. I haven't looked back, love DE shaving. I also have a 'fogless*' mirror in my shower since I sometimes shave in the shower. (* it has since lost its fogless ability, I need a new one).

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by kmarizo View Post
                  I also have a 'fogless*' mirror in my shower since I sometimes shave in the shower. (* it has since lost its fogless ability, I need a new one).
                  I wonder if treating it with something like RainX would make it "fogless" again.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Safety razors don't give me razor burn on the neck; standard cartridge razors do. That's the real difference to me. The shave from a safety razor doesn't seem to last as long, as they cut at the surface of the skin and don't lift the hair before cutting like many cartridge razors do -- but, I think this is why they don't cause razor burn.

                    Safety razors are a bit more time consuming, since you need to be a bit more careful. It's relatively difficult to cut yourself with a cartridge razor, but it's not difficult (at least for me) to cut yourself with a safety razor.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      there are a couple of threads on this in the off topic section where i chimed in. I will sum up my opinion and experience though...

                      I have dark, coarse whiskers and can grow a full beard..but also sensitive and sometimes dry skin. regular razors gave me consistent burn. I tried tons. So then I dove into safety razors. I went all in with the hot towel, preshaves, etc etc. I tried at least 20 blades, 6 razors, and I cant count how many creams, soaps, and "croapes". Here is where I landed...

                      Face mapping is more important than ANY of the products I tried. Your whiskers dont just grow down on your face and up on your kneck. Mine go so far as to have a swirl pattern in one area.

                      Shaving with or against the grain has as much impact on razor burn as any product.

                      Good may be the enemy of great but so is perfection. Do not try for "baby butt smooth" shaves every time. Save those for special date nights or soemthing because it only stays that way for a part of the day and you are sacrificing a lot of comfort chasing that whale.

                      Certain blades can behave different in certain razors. Find your combo and stick with it.

                      You cant fly with razor blades so either have a brand you can buy everywhere yo travel or keep a catridge razor that will get you buy on trips. I found that Dollar Tree still sells sensor excel 2 blade razors so I like those.

                      Product is over-rated. With good technique, I can cold shave with bar soap hand lathered with no nicks or burn. Cold shave means cold water, no pre-shave or post shave anything.


                      Here is the combo I landed on.
                      Razorock Jaws Open Comb razor. Cant find it anymore but its a pretty aggressive razor.
                      Crystal razor blades made in Isreal.
                      Taylor of Bond Street or Razorock "croaps". its a soft soap, a mix of creme and soap.
                      Thayers witchhazel or Loccitan balm if I need an aftershave soothing.

                      Now that I know my face and I know better technique, I can shave OK with even a cartridge. Controlling your blade passes is key so multi blade stuff will nail you fast. One pass with a 5 blade is like 5 passes with a single blade. Thats why I like the old 2 blade cartridges if I have to use something off the shelf. I can handle a pass with the grain and then a pass across the grain from one of those and get a good shave on the road.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        I made the switch in college, and didn't have much need to shave before then. When I did shave, I used an electric razor, which tended to tug at my hair and really hurt. I also used cartridge razors, but got annoyed about having to buy cartridges, so I never really made it part of my routine, and opted for the painful electric instead.

                        I ended up buying a pretty cheap safety razor handle set up at a supermarket (Target maybe?) and it's lasted for years. I have since invested in a brush, extra blades, different soaps, and a bowl for them. Overall, I love it. I don't need to shave often (once, maybe twice a week) so it doesn't take up much of my time anyway, but I don't find it any slower than shaving with a cartridge now that I'm practiced. There was a learning curve at first, in terms of getting the angles right, but after some youtube videos and a couple of weeks, you'll figure it out. One tip which I'm not sure anyone mentioned yet: pre-shave oil. I didn't really have much trouble before I bought this, but now that I use it regularly I get zero nicks. The one I have is basically mildly scented grapeseed oil, so you probably could even use a dab of that from the kitchen. But I like the smell and it lasts a while, so I like it. I put it on first, then the lather, and it's buttery smooth.

                        As for convenience, I find it extremely convenient. I can usually get away with not shaving when I travel, so that's not an issue for me. I don't shave in the shower, because even with years of practice I'm scared to do it without a mirror, but I'm sure you could figure out a way to do this if you were motivated. I'd get a handle with a good grip.

                        As for cost, the sky is the limit, but not necessary. You can get a decent handle for well under 30 bucks. If you want you can still use shave gel, but I prefer the soaps. Williams shave soap runs about $1 and I find it's decent - stick it in a mug and go. You can find brushes for as little as a couple bucks for a synthetic, and a sampler pack of blades is just another couple bucks. Or, get a whole starter pack on sale for 30 bucks: https://www.maggardrazors.com/produc...c-starter-kit/ Once you're buying blades in bulk, I think I bought 100 feather blades at 25 bucks a box - that's 25 cents per blade. I only go through a blade per month max, so that's going to last me almost a decade.

                        ​​​​​​​I think a big draw of safety razors is the customizability and standardization. You can pick and choose handles, blades, soap scents/properties, brushes, etc. And, while it's possible your favorite blades could get discontinued, you can just buy different ones that will still fit your razor, instead of buying a whole new handle. If the bottom line for you is convenience, you might be slightly better off sticking with your set up now. But I think safety razors have the edge (ha!) on price (over time) and comfort.

                        Also, if you're thinking about it but don't want to commit 100%, you can go halfway. Maybe start with a brush and shave soap, see if you like how that lathers better than the can of barbasol, and how your skin feels.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          idvsego I'd say I settle for 'good enough' more days than not. Working from home full time now means I am only shaving every other day. And with winter about to land full force, my shaving will stop completely.

                          My good enough shaves generally go with grain, cross grain, against the grain. I then grab a cartridge shaver to clean up the areas I missed with the safety razor. Definitely not fancy, but it gets the job done.

                          christophe I have been buying blades in bulk for a while now. However with me not shaving in winters, and now cutting back to shaving only two or three times a week, those bulk blades are lasting me a long time.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                            idvsego I'd say I settle for 'good enough' more days than not. Working from home full time now means I am only shaving every other day. And with winter about to land full force, my shaving will stop completely.

                            My good enough shaves generally go with grain, cross grain, against the grain. I then grab a cartridge shaver to clean up the areas I missed with the safety razor. Definitely not fancy, but it gets the job done.

                            christophe I have been buying blades in bulk for a while now. However with me not shaving in winters, and now cutting back to shaving only two or three times a week, those bulk blades are lasting me a long time.
                            I chased the "BBS" dragon for a while and it always bites you lol. I have a full on beard now though so the only thing I shave is my neck and the cheek line. My 200 pack of blades and 14 soaps will last me until the end of time lol.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              I've been wet shaving since about 2013, so 7 years now (has it really been that long?!). I echo what everyone has said about sensitive skin and cartridge razors leaving redness on my neck.
                              I'll admit I probably dove in too fast, bought an expensive razor, brush and cream right off the bat. The upside is that I still use the Merkur Progressive razor I bought in 2013. I just looked it up and it's now way more expensive than I remember it being, but I highly recommend it. The progressive system means that you can adjust the attack of the blade to suit your face and skill. I find that at the mildest setting it's actually really hard to cut yourself without sliding the razor perpendicular to the blade. I've replaced the brush (the original never stopped shedding) and have replaced blades and soaps over time. My current setup is a Taylor of Old Bond Street Jermyn Street Soap with Derby Premium blades. I bought the soap for $25CAD about a year ago and still have lots left, and the blades cost about $10CAD for 100 blades. If you can stop yourself buying new things all the time it definitely is cheaper. I find I get about 3 shaves out of each blade, shaving three times a week, my cost per shave is absolutely tiny.
                              As for travelling with it, if your checking bags it's not really an issue. My wife and I both use DE razors and travel with them semi-regularly with her family in the UK, mine in Vancouver, and us living in Halifax.
                              For avoiding nicks and cuts I have few pieces of advice. At first go slow if you can. Use short strokes rather than long. As has already been said, learn the direction your hair grows and act accordingly. Pre-shave products can be worth it; I have used both pre-shave oils and creams.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by JeremyDRintoul View Post
                                For avoiding nicks and cuts I have few pieces of advice. At first go slow if you can. Use short strokes rather than long. As has already been said, learn the direction your hair grows and act accordingly.
                                This is what I do. I think that most beginners underestimate the weight of the DE razor (and its aggressiveness) and don't realize that a heavier razor will turn your face into swiss cheese if you treat it like a light disposable. Now, if I do short strokes I don't cut myself and wind up with a clean shave. For mild shaves I like my Gillette fat handle tech. For slightly more aggressive shaves I like my Merkur 33c.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X