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Should I worry about how clothing is perceived on to the wearer?

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  • DocDave
    replied
    [QUOTE=idvsego;n430577 I wouldnt show up to the park to play basketball wearing a full lakers kit and $250 shoes. Im just not good enough to draw attention to myself like that. Not for the reputation but for my game. I need to fly under the radar and surprise people or I will get shut down lol. [/QUOTE]

    Exactly! That's part of the dilemma of picking out what to wear/ride in. Showing up in a fancy pants expensive kit without the cajones to back it up is just asking for trouble! I like flying under the radar too. Some cycling kits encourage flash, others less-so. Those are the ones I am interested in.

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  • idvsego
    replied
    I came in here to say "I didn't expect this from you" but when i saw it was related to a sport, I understood. I am not into cycling and I admittedly didnt read this whole thread because I couldn't relate to all of it. But Im a sports guy so I get the idea. I have to say I would pay attention personally but you dont have to. I wouldnt show up to the park to play basketball wearing a full lakers kit and $250 shoes. Im just not good enough to draw attention to myself like that. Not for the reputation but for my game. I need to fly under the radar and surprise people or I will get shut down lol. However, I wouldnt have a problem wearing a quick dry hawks shirt because Im a fan.

    I slightly relate this to concert tees too. I wouldn't wear a bands tee shirt to their concert unless I was a mega fan. Because if someone walks up to me and is like "dude!!!" and asks me a bunch of Qs, I need to be able to answer them, not say "I just heard two of their songs on TikTok and thought it was cool."

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  • DocDave
    replied
    facelessghost Rapha is interesting as a company. Whenever I bring up their name in cycling company. a debate usually breaks out. Seems like everyone has an opinion on them. More-so than any other brand. I don't know why. I have heard their bib shorts are very comfortable. Same for their jerseys. I don't own any of their stuff, but I am seeing more and more of it on the road these days.

    Similar to you, I wore kits that were given to me for the longest time. Although unlike you, I never raced. These were just kits work or friends or whatever ended up giving me. Quality was across the board. Some chamois were super comfortable and I reached for them all the time. Others we crap and I hardly wore them at all.

    Now that I am past all of my free kits, I am looking to purchase some that will last for a couple of seasons or more. But wow. Prices are up there. And many items are sold out, what with the rush to cycle during the pandemic.

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  • facelessghost
    replied
    Originally posted by DocDave View Post
    Since I started paying attention to cycling kits I've been seeing a ton of Rapha gear on the roads. Rapha is pretty much the only kit I can easily pick out thanks to the arm band and the labelling on the shorts. I hear their gear is comfortable, but I have no experience with them. Maybe one day if it goes on sale.
    I've never considered forking out for Rapha, Assos, etc. From 2006-09 I raced pretty seriously (cat 1 and 2) and racked up major miles. In that time, I wore nothing but team-issued clothing, which was always the basic club-level stuff (Squadra, Voler, etc.). I never had any complaints about comfort, other than that the Sugoi shorts I wore one year had a super thick chamois, which I didn't love. In my experience, as long as you've got a thin, flexible chamois and no tags or seams that scratch you, you're good. The rest is mostly marketing.

    What you really need to do (after you've ridden enough to adapt your sit bones) is (a) lather your crotch with chamois cream before the ride, and (b) scrub your crotch with antibacterial soap in the shower after the ride. That will pretty much eliminate saddle sores.

    As for style, wear your club's kit, or wear black shorts with a solid jersey (that isn't high-viz yellow). Do that and it's hard to go wrong.

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  • andrewrg
    replied
    Originally posted by carlitos View Post
    Same here. I bought some Chinese knockoff stuff from dhgate and it's fine except that I'm apparently a XXL top and L bottoms in Chinese cycling gear.
    Same. Some of the knockoff stuff is junk, but enough of it is just fine that I was able to get a whole week's worth of all black bibs for $25ea and ride erryday without having to do cycling kit laundry until the weekend. I do try to matchy-matchy my jersey and socks, though, because #SOCKDOPING is real!! I can usually find great socks with the same color scheme as my charity ride jerseys, then I've got matching kit for (literally) days. Is there such a thing as an interchangeable cycling wardrobe?

    Funny story I heard on GCN's Youtube series (hosted by some ex-pro racers): another ex-pro friend of the presenter said he never thought about the logos on his team's jerseys until after he was finished with pro cycling and stopped to use the bathroom at a gas station. He immediately recognized one of his team's sponsor logos--on the urinal. Go figure.

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  • DocDave
    replied
    Since I started paying attention to cycling kits I've been seeing a ton of Rapha gear on the roads. Rapha is pretty much the only kit I can easily pick out thanks to the arm band and the labelling on the shorts. I hear their gear is comfortable, but I have no experience with them. Maybe one day if it goes on sale.

    Leave a comment:


  • carlitos
    replied
    Originally posted by DocDave View Post

    The challenge with cycling gear, at least for me, is finding gear that isn't covered in logos.
    Same here. I bought some Chinese knockoff stuff from dhgate and it's fine except that I'm apparently a XXL top and L bottoms in Chinese cycling gear.

    I have some non- or small-logo stuff from Nashbar and Garneaux (sp?) that I like. I wear it like workout stuff; mixing and matching. The Chinese "rapha" stuff doesn't have the logos all over it, so that gets rotated as well. Sometimes I wear the matching top / bottoms, but I feel like a jerk.

    I have one overly-logo fully-matched set, and I feel silly wearing it. Honestly, I don't even know what some of the logos mean.

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  • JDOG
    replied
    I’ve been “seriously” cycling for a long time. I actually used to race (Cat. 2) but now do long, kind of fast club rides on the weekend. While matchy-matchy is a thing, it can go horribly wrong. Just look at Ostroy. In my experience, Assos is nice but way overpriced for that niceness. There are plenty of brands that match the quality for a lot less. Rapha is overpriced and is super trendy. I compare it to Ralph Lauren back when it was better quality. Much of Rapha apparel is made in China. Most of Santini, for example, is made in Italy, the heart of cycling. Also, comfort is most important. $300 bib shorts or $400 bike shoes aren’t worth anything if they aren’t comfortable and you dread wearing them.

    There is some truth to the idea that your “kit” can look as outrageous as possible as long as your legs do the actual talking. Some garish bike apparel is also partly designed for visibility.

    When the club ride meets at the parking lot, some outfits get comments but not usually. It would take a lot to get people to remark on an outfit. Bikes get much more attention. A $12,000 Pinarello or even a $7,000 Specialized will get way more attention than your kit. Heck, my Masi generates more conversations that someone’s Rapha jersey with its minimal design and discrete branding.

    Ultimately, dress the way you want but in stuff that helps you perform at your best. As with regular clothing, tone down crazy or bright patterns with a more subdued piece, like pair whatever jersey you fancy with black or navy shorts. Or set off the kit (calling it a “kit” is kind of pretentious too) with a pop of bright gloves or crazy water bottle cages (supacaz.com). I’m happy to guide you through the maze of cycling style. Hmmm, maybe I should start a Dappered spin-off…

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  • DocDave
    replied
    I ended up purchasing a kit that has minimal to no branding on it. So far, the kit is very comfortable and I'm happy with my purchase.

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  • Hebrew Barrister
    replied
    Originally posted by tankerjohn View Post

    LOL! Where's my "can of worms" emoji? Okay, so on the first bit, the "Fred" look is never good, typified by the overweight middle-aged white guy who looks like a stuffed sausage in his cycling kit. But at least that guy is getting out there and riding. I'm pretty conflicted about e-bikes. Instinctively, I don't like them. I adore the simplicity of bicycle gearing and the ingenious machination of converting human energy into rapid movement. E-bikes seem completely antithetical to that ideal. They feel like a cheat, both out of either having to pedal and out of having to comply with motorcycle regulations. Having said all that, I certainly see e-bikes' utility for commuters and enabling people with disabilities to ride, so I don't want to get too down on them. In fact, they are a great transportation and recreation option for a lot of people. But fat guys in cycling kit not pedaling up hills ruin it for everyone.
    E-bike seems like a great way to get through a crowded traffic ridden downtown area while getting to ignore motorcycle regulations. I have to imagine that's the main use case.

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  • Pborkstrom
    replied
    I have a OCLV 5200 road bike. I personally was never a fan of the sponsorship outfits, but if you have a slim, tall build, it could look sweet.

    I do F3 workouts and I post in Ranger Panties and a size too small shirt. That to say - if you have the confidence, you can wear what you like. Wear the cycling gear, and don’t let the cycling gear wear you.

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  • tankerjohn
    replied
    Originally posted by mark4 View Post

    This reminds me of the other guy you don't want to be: I saw a guy in spandex padded biking shorts and a tech fabric bike jersey - not the high end racing stuff but still, stuff built for breaking a sweat - out for a ride...on an electric-assist bicycle. He's going up an incline without pedaling. He looked like he could use exercise, but wasn't getting much or any...my theory was his wife keeps nagging him to get some exercise because the Dr. said he really needs to, so he gets this bike and goes out looking like he's actually going to be pedaling, but uses it in electronic mode for most or all of the "ride". The wife probably doesn't even know it's an electronic bike. Not sure why else a guy wouldn't just wear street clothes to tool around in electric propulsion mode.
    LOL! Where's my "can of worms" emoji? Okay, so on the first bit, the "Fred" look is never good, typified by the overweight middle-aged white guy who looks like a stuffed sausage in his cycling kit. But at least that guy is getting out there and riding. I'm pretty conflicted about e-bikes. Instinctively, I don't like them. I adore the simplicity of bicycle gearing and the ingenious machination of converting human energy into rapid movement. E-bikes seem completely antithetical to that ideal. They feel like a cheat, both out of either having to pedal and out of having to comply with motorcycle regulations. Having said all that, I certainly see e-bikes' utility for commuters and enabling people with disabilities to ride, so I don't want to get too down on them. In fact, they are a great transportation and recreation option for a lot of people. But fat guys in cycling kit not pedaling up hills ruin it for everyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • DocDave
    replied
    I don't own any Assos stuff but the feedback provided by JT10000 is pretty much what I consistently hear. Might be time for me to look in to investing in a pair of Assos bibs.

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  • JT10000
    replied
    Originally posted by facelessghost View Post

    Sooo ... Rapha or Assos?
    I was thinking exactly that. And about to add "Assos is perceived as for people with money and bad taste." "Rapha is for people with money and good taste, or who at least can tell who else has good taste and wants to emulate them. But you do you."

    PS - I have a couple pair of plan black Assos shorts and OMG they are so good.....

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  • ZoeScott
    replied
    I do actually suck at cycling wearing, however I'm planning to buy a bike, so maybe I'll need some of those things you'r4e speaking about now

    Leave a comment:

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