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    #16
    I'd like to install a pergola on our back patio (basic cement slab) as we like to work outside and there's little shade right there for most of the day. Anyone have any suggestions for a DIY pergola that worked for them? All the pre-made kits seem really expensive and cheaply made so I'd prefer to get a good plan that's worked well for others, pick up some lumber, and make it myself.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Rodeoyogi View Post
      I'd like to install a pergola on our back patio (basic cement slab) as we like to work outside and there's little shade right there for most of the day. Anyone have any suggestions for a DIY pergola that worked for them? All the pre-made kits seem really expensive and cheaply made so I'd prefer to get a good plan that's worked well for others, pick up some lumber, and make it myself.
      Haven’t built one personally but I have helped two friends build theirs (both are professional contractors so I was just free labor). It’s not overly difficult if you have a average knowledge of construction and all of the right equipment. Getting the lumber is easy, but I’d suggest you contact someone who has built one so they can advise you on what equipment you’ll need.

      One thing to keep in mind is that city codes can vary wildly when it comes to pergolas. For instance, in the city I live in if you have a pergola that is attached in any way to your house then it is considered an extension of your home and you have to get a permit from the city to build a home extension or else you’ll be in violation of codes. However if it’s not attached to the house then that rule doesn’t apply. Just something to look into before you start building.

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        #18
        Originally posted by abh159 View Post

        Haven’t built one personally but I have helped two friends build theirs (both are professional contractors so I was just free labor). It’s not overly difficult if you have a average knowledge of construction and all of the right equipment. Getting the lumber is easy, but I’d suggest you contact someone who has built one so they can advise you on what equipment you’ll need.

        One thing to keep in mind is that city codes can vary wildly when it comes to pergolas. For instance, in the city I live in if you have a pergola that is attached in any way to your house then it is considered an extension of your home and you have to get a permit from the city to build a home extension or else you’ll be in violation of codes. However if it’s not attached to the house then that rule doesn’t apply. Just something to look into before you start building.
        Let me second abh159 's sage advice. As a member of our local village's Board of Adjustments and Appeals (where residents plead their case for code variances), I HIGHLY recommend that you check with your local building authority BEFORE you begin a pergola project. Not only can they give you guidance on compliant sizes and locations for your pergola, but they are a wealth of information on what to look for when selecting a contractor, if you seek the help of one. It often takes a simple email or phone call to get the information you need.

        One additional piece of advice - if your home is part of an HOA, check with them as well before you start your project. I've unfortunately seen too many structures taken down after the fact because they didn't comply with city and/or HOA regulations. Such a preventable waste of time, money and materials.
        Sent from my CONTROL shoe phone inside the Cone of Silence

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          #19
          Defiantly a big issue, I worked in zoning and permitting and was getting a master as a planner before I found environmental law and planning more interesting. 80% of the job was giving permits for contractors the other 20% was tell people that they would have there structure torn down at there cost and then fined. Some cities even won't let you reapply or apply for other modifications for a long period of time, though that is very few. The easy solution is call the planning and zoning office and ask for the permitting officer or any of the planners. I would also call early most people have field work in the afternoons.

          Originally posted by minty007 View Post

          Let me second abh159 's sage advice. As a member of our local village's Board of Adjustments and Appeals (where residents plead their case for code variances), I HIGHLY recommend that you check with your local building authority BEFORE you begin a pergola project. Not only can they give you guidance on compliant sizes and locations for your pergola, but they are a wealth of information on what to look for when selecting a contractor, if you seek the help of one. It often takes a simple email or phone call to get the information you need.

          One additional piece of advice - if your home is part of an HOA, check with them as well before you start your project. I've unfortunately seen too many structures taken down after the fact because they didn't comply with city and/or HOA regulations. Such a preventable waste of time, money and materials.

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            #20
            Yup. I've been planning to built a permaculture in my backyard this summer. And as a small pond for my goldfishes and bettas. I don't want them to suffer on the indoor aquarium. Also, as I'll be spending more time at my house, I need to get a small outdoor cabin built with bamboos and stick in some patios.
            P.S. Im not a pro, just giving it a try.

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              #21
              One thing of note, Herons of all types LOVE fish ponds for hunting. They are not picky on type of fish or size. Put netting over type of the pond and vegetation in the pound for the fish to hide. The smaller the squares the better with bright color for the night. The bright color let’s you avoid getting the bird tangled and you having to call animal control. Herons are fast and blend easily making them hard to spot. Also love hunting in the early morning. They have a wide range and fly all over in the hunt for food.

              QUOTE=jrjong;n429297]Yup. I've been planning to built a permaculture in my backyard this summer. And as a small pond for my goldfishes and bettas. I don't want them to suffer on the indoor aquarium. Also, as I'll be spending more time at my house, I need to get a small outdoor cabin built with bamboos and stick in some patios.
              P.S. Im not a pro, just giving it a try.[/QUOTE]

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                #22
                Set the UV light trap for mosquitos on two ends of your backyard. This will not only trap the mosquitoes but also Hotmail login other flies and disturbing insects. Also, if it doesn't help, get the anti-mosquito rubbing gel and rub it all over your uncovered body.
                Last edited by jrjong; June 29, 2020, 11:13 AM.

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