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Blazer/sport coat at Nordstrom?

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    Blazer/sport coat at Nordstrom?



    I'm planning to shoot over to Nordstrom before the end of the sale and do some browsing. My wardrobe is severely lacking (none at all) in the blazers/sports coat area, and was thinking of picking up one of these. I really like the look of an earth-toned sport coats (corduroy in particular), although I know a navy blazer is pretty timeless as well. So, I guess this is a two-part question. For a first "odd jacket" buy, which would you recommend, and can you recommend one in particular available during the Nordstrom sale? I'd say the budget for the jacket is in the 150-200$ range.


    Thanks, and I look forward to learning a lot on this forum in the future!


    #2


    If you were to purchase just one, definitely go with a navy blazer. It's the most versatile. Unfortunately can't look for one in particular, but I just thought I'd interject that.

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      #3


      No worries, thanks for the reply. Curious, whats the general feeling on the classic brass buttons? I actually like that somewhat old-fashioned look to them, but I'd still like to dress age appropriate (mid-20s). As long as its a well-fitting blazer, are those buttons going to be fine, or should I look for something a bit more modern? Does a blazer without those buttons just basically become a suit jacket without matching pants? Am I taking crazy pills?

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        #4


        I own a Navy Peter Millar sportcoat from Nordstrom and it has a nice trim classic fit. I know that sounds strange but it has high enough arm holes to look modern but it is not an italian looking jacket. It really is timeless and earns alot of compliments. I am considering picking up this one and think it would work for you as well... http://shop.nordstrom.com/S/peter-mi...esultback=1472 It would work with tan or navy pants/slacks and is only slightly above the budget you listed. Quality is great and it should last a few years.


        Another option would be the Navy J Crew ludlow sportcoat. I hope that helps.

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          #5


          There are a lot of buttons styles that go well with a blazer. Brass or gold is classic. Silver is beautiful. Mother of pearl is sleek and classy. Smoked mother of pearl is more subtle. Myself, I like the "antiqued brass" look. Brass, but more of a dull bronze color than shiny polished brass. You can have an emblem (university or club is appropriate), or a simple geometric pattern, or plain. (I Like simple geometric for me.) Do whatever you think looks good on you, that you can wear with confidence.


          I guess my only specific recommendation would be that you shouldn't hesistate to look like a grownup. "Age appropriate" is a passing fashion fad, and you might not be happy with it a few years down the road. A blazer with nice buttons is a classic look for a lifetime.

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            #6


            I should also add that the choice of buttons is something you can easily change later, so I wouldn't worry too much about it for the long term. Nice buttons are pretty inexpensive as long as they're not solid gold, even solid sterling silver is pretty reasonable, and other choices like mother of pearl, brass, horn, almond nut, etc, are also affordable. It's easy to change buttons, and it's pretty cheap to have a professional job done by a tailor if you're not into doing it yourself.


            Get the color/fabric and the fit right from from start. Buttons can be changed cheaply and easily. I know a guy who rotates his buttons seasonally, but that's way too much effot for me!

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              #7


              Good point about the buttons, never thought about that. Here's where I get confused in the whole blazer/sport coat/suit jacket deal. I really like the checked sport coat posted above. Does the fact that this jacket doesn't have matching pants automatically make it a sports jacket? Is there a difference in cut between the two, or is it just that one has matching pants? Is wearing a patterned jacket going to look like I'm wearing a suit jacket that I lost the pants to? I really want to start expanding my wardrobe in the area of sports jackets and blazers for the colder seasons to come, but I would really like to be clear on the differences.


              Thanks guys.

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                #8


                The differences between a sport coat, a suit jacket, and a blazer have gotten really blurred in recent years. I remember reading a post either here at Dappered, TheStyleBlogger, or somewhere else that went through the differences between the three. If no one else has posted it here by the next time I'm on, I'll try and find it. But for now, here's the reader's digest version that I can recall from my memory:


                Suit jackets are created as a part of a suit, but by no means *need* to be worn with it. Thus the reason why suit separates are pretty popular. You can wear the jacket as a blazer/sport coat one day, the pants as part of a different outfit the next, the suit as a whole the third day, and odds are no one is going to notice (though they might if you actually did that all in three consecutive days).


                The differences between sport coats and blazers is related to their origins. Sport coats originated with the hunting dress of 18th (and possibly 17th) century noblemen. The buttons tend to match or at least blend in with the overall color/pattern of the fabric. On the other hand, blazers originated with the uniforms of navy sailors. It follows that *navy* blue is the most traditional color for a blazer and brass buttons are similarly a facet of a classically styled blazer.


                I believe the article I'm thinking of mentions some of the associations with certain fabrics that are made because of these differences in origin, but I can't remember them. The rule of thumb I tend to go by is: if it's got bright buttons (of any color or material) it's probably a blazer. If the buttons blend in, it's probably a sport coat...or a stylish man wearing a suit jacket as a separate.


                Whether you're wearing a blazer, a sport coat, or a suit separate, it really doesn't matter much. Most people outside of the style-inclined community probably aren't going to be able to tell you what makes a sport coat different from a blazer. Though just about everyone in that community is going to tell you that if you're looking to expand your wardrobe you should *really* have a classically styled navy blue blazer.

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                  #9


                  I guess the line isn't incredibly distinct, but I see what you're saying. I think I'm going to go with a navy blazer for my first buy, now I just need to find something around my price that will look good and last. I've also seen a few corduroy or tweed sportscoats I really like, but I'd probably grab those after the blazer.


                  As far as what you said about suit jacket as a separate, it seems like this would work with the right jacket, but something like say, a pinstriped jacket will always look like you're missing the pants, right? Just seems like the vertical lines would lead the eye to expect the same in the pants. Maybe not, I'm new to this!


                  Thanks for the advice everyone.

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                    #10


                    I think the distinction between suit coats and blazers/sport coats is a little wider and more people would know than you might guess. Simply put, sport coats and blazers are more casual for a variety of reasons. They typically use more casual fabrics, have casual details such as flap pockets and often have casual styles of buttons. Suit coats are typically made from smoother, more formal fabric and lack the casual details of sport coats/blazers. It rarely works to wear an orphaned suit coat in my opinion. And you're right, it just does not work with pin stripes.

                    "You don't need money to dress better than you do" - Salvatore Romano

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                      #11


                      Yeah, I agree on the suit coat. Is there any difference in the cut between the three? I've read that sports coats are generally more unstructured, and like you said, use more casual fabrics, but should they all fit you pretty much the same? Seems like blazers are meant to be a bit shorter than a suit jacket, no?

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                        #12


                        I'm fine with my casual jackets being shorter. Traditionalists will say that any jacket should cover your rear.

                        "You don't need money to dress better than you do" - Salvatore Romano

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                          #13


                          Okay. So is 210 (after 40% off) way too much for this jacket? I really don't know how Tommy Hilfiger's quality is, but it's got almost everything I'm looking for. Slim fit, good reviews, 100% wool, the elusive size 43...the picture looks good, although a bit long, no? I think I'd swap out the buttons for sure, mother of pearl would be nice IMO.


                          Edit: After adding another 10% coupon, it comes to 200.34 with taxes, shipping would be free. Worth a shot, or bad choice?

                          Comment


                            #14


                            I presume that this is the piece I was recalling information from: http://dappered.com/2011/06/the-differences-between-a-sportcoat-blazer-and-suit-jacket/


                            And yes now that you guys mentioned it is generally harder to wear a suit jacket on its own as compared to a blazer or a sport coat. But at the same time, I'm willing to contend that if you had the right cut and fabric you could still wear an orphaned suit jacket. Though I'd wager it's not something for those new to dressing well.

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                              #15


                              Yepp, I've definitely read that before. I only have 2 suits (gray, navy pinstripe) and I don't think I could or would try to wear either without the matching pants. I'm going out to Nordstrom after work today, I'd like to find a solid navy blazer on sale, but we'll see. Like I said, I really love the look of some earth-tone sports coats, especially for the Fall season, so if I see one I really like the look and fit of, I might jump on that. Or both. Plus strands... It's pay week.


                              Thanks again for the help. I'll probably bump this thread with pics if I make a related purchase.

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