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What are some of your nitpicking/ dislikes about today's menswear?

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  • ianr
    replied
    Tech fabrics don't really bother me as much as fast fashion companies selling stuff as "tech" when it is just polyester pants.

    $300 technical gear for hiking through the wilderness I totally understand. There is R&D that goes into that kind of stuff.

    $30 tech pants are just polyester. Come on now.

    Leave a comment:


  • stuffedsuperdud
    replied
    Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post
    2) "Tech fabrics." Menswear marketers got smart and realized they can exploit the current trend for "sustainable" and "environmentally-friendly" products by drenching products in artificial fabrics like polyester, and call it a "tech fabric." This trend of "tech fabric" is a reversion to the 1970s when everyone thought polyester was the modern, technologically-advanced fabric of the future. This time around, they're just greenwashing it. The irony is that that the man-made fibers are worse for the environment! They're all just made of plastic. Natural fibers, particularly wool, have a far lower environmental impact. I can't believe that more manufacturers of natural fabrics haven't yet pushed back against these false claims that their fabrics are unsustainable. The only company I've seen do so so far is Naadam, a small cashmere company. But now I'm just ranting...
    I mean, I'm as disgusted by re-branded polyester clothes as you are, but from a sustainability perspective, do natural fibers necessarily have a lower environmental impact? Sure, they biodegrade eventually, but not that quickly, otherwise your clothes would rot before your eyes like food, and the process of, say, washing cotton fibers, spinning it into yarn, and weaving it into a sheet might end up being pretty dirty, especially if its done in an unregulated 3rd World shop where the owner is free to dump detergents and solvents into an adjacent river.

    Speaking of Naadam, btw, I'm going to have to call BS on roughly 100% of their marketing. In fact, reading their blurbs I'd say that they're kind of a microcosm of everything wrong with the "democratizing" luxury, 3rd world exploitation, conspicuous consumption, and woke capitalism elements of fashion; it seems like most of these new enterprises are just bloated MBA projects run by people who don't understand or appreciate their own product, which I guess is my #menswear pet peeve. With Naadam specifically, the short story is that there is nothing sustainable about cheap cashmere produced in great volumes. To make it happen, you have to graze the heck out of the land until your goats are just short of starving, producing shorter, coarser fibers in the process. The result is a miserable herd, destroyed grasslands, and an inferior sweater. Governments of Mongolia, Tibet, etc. go along with it because they see this as a chance to catch up a bit with the global economy, but it's a short term solution with clear long term penalties.

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  • Alex.C
    replied
    Originally posted by Hebrew Barrister View Post
    I've railed about the inseam bullshit forever. A 30in inseam being the typical shortest is nuts, because a 30in inseam is about right for someone just under six feet.
    I'm 5'10" and there is no way I could wear a 30 in inseam without showing a good inch and a half of sock

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  • Alex.C
    replied
    Originally posted by evanparker View Post
    i really think i'll be quite nearly alone in this one, but I constantly wish that more shoe companies would make wide sizes more available. I have so many great Allen Edmonds shoes I just LOVE but to be perfectly honest they're the only shoes that even fit me well, besides a pair of Justin/Chippewa boots i have.
    Opposite but similar problem. I really need a very narrow fit on my shoes (particularly my heel) and standard width shoes are voluminous on my feet.
    Last edited by Alex.C; January 6, 2020, 02:59 PM.

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  • Hebrew Barrister
    replied
    Originally posted by 77Pat View Post
    Yeah, I remember reading this article and being surprised by the picture https://www.themodestman.com/clothing-industry-sizes/
    I've railed about the inseam bullshit forever. A 30in inseam being the typical shortest is nuts, because a 30in inseam is about right for someone just under six feet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Creature
    replied
    For me it is the lack of true athletic options. I’m 6’4” and foot between 210-225 depending on my eating habits and such. EVERY single pair of pants and button down shirt I have (unless it is MTM) gets tailored.

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  • 77Pat
    replied
    Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post
    LL Bean is notorious for oversized fits. I don’t think it’s vanity, I think it’s just that their target audience isn’t concerned with properly tailored fits. I bought a short sleeve linen shirt from LL Bean in a size medium and it was way too big; it definitely fit more like a large. I am 5’9” 180 and I had to size down to a small to get a proper fit.
    Yeah, I remember reading this article and being surprised by the picture https://www.themodestman.com/clothing-industry-sizes/

    Leave a comment:


  • gaseousclay
    replied
    Originally posted by paintflinger View Post
    North Face is popular simply due to name brand recognition. They used to make durable stuff and the current stuff is ok, but people mostly buy it because people know they make insulated winter coats that aren't too pricey.
    Agreed. I’d say the same goes for Patagonia but a little pricier. I see a lot of both around town.

    Leave a comment:


  • gaseousclay
    replied
    Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post
    LL Bean is notorious for oversized fits. I don’t think it’s vanity, I think it’s just that their target audience isn’t concerned with properly tailored fits. I bought a short sleeve linen shirt from LL Bean in a size medium and it was way too big; it definitely fit more like a large. I am 5’9” 180 and I had to size down to a small to get a proper fit.
    Filson as well. I have two of their shirts from a few years ago that were made in their Seattle fit, and those fit well enough despite sizing down. I bought the Tacoma work jacket several months back and ended up selling it on eBay because it was too billowy and cut for someone with the physique of Lou Ferrigno.

    Leave a comment:


  • hockeysc23
    replied
    Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post
    LL Bean is notorious for oversized fits. I don’t think it’s vanity, I think it’s just that their target audience isn’t concerned with properly tailored fits. I bought a short sleeve linen shirt from LL Bean in a size medium and it was way too big; it definitely fit more like a large. I am 5’9” 180 and I had to size down to a small to get a proper fit.
    Agreed. I got a lovely flannel (colors and pattern) from my wife in a medium and it’s very large. It seems they also have their flannels longer for wearing tucked in which I don’t do. Shame. I really like the pattern.

    Leave a comment:


  • ImagePree
    replied
    Originally posted by Burner View Post
    I've mentioned it before in these threads, but I'll bring it up again. Try the White Oak Cone Denim from Jomers:

    https://jomers.com/products/white-oak-cone-denim-rinse

    100% cotton. $34 with free shipping (though you may need them hemmed). They are mid-weight in a basic dark rinse color, with good fabric and seemingly solid construction. The measurements are on the page. If you want a solid pair of rigid jeans and the dimensions work for you, you can't go wrong with these. And FWIW, I find their "slim" fit in size 32 to fit similarly to my 770 (i.e straight-fit) JCrew chinos.
    +1 on this.
    I wear mine at least twice a week.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evenflow
    replied
    They were making slim at one point, and it was too slim for my needs.

    Leave a comment:


  • garryowen47
    replied
    LL Bean is notorious for oversized fits. I don’t think it’s vanity, I think it’s just that their target audience isn’t concerned with properly tailored fits. I bought a short sleeve linen shirt from LL Bean in a size medium and it was way too big; it definitely fit more like a large. I am 5’9” 180 and I had to size down to a small to get a proper fit.

    Leave a comment:


  • mark4
    replied
    Ima be a contrarian and say that I like stretch built into pants, including jeans. Not tons of stretch, but like 2-3% stretch fabric is great. Really can't fathom why anyone wouldn't appreciate a little give in their trousers. I dislike cheap, thin, underweight denim - at least in the winter - and I think the issue a lot of guys have with the stretch stuff is really more that the fabric is flimsy than that it has a little give. It's not the stretch per se that is causing that, it's the underweight denim fabric everyone is using - 11-12 oz denim instead of 14 oz or higher. That said, looking at the 10 day forecast I'm not sure we're going to get anything approaching a real winter here in the DC area and heavyweight denim can be brutal in warm weather. 11 oz denim is a lot more comfortable at 70 degrees and up and that's more of what we're getting here...I almost feel like my entire winter wardrobe is aspirational rather than practical at this point.

    I also don't mind patch pockets on light weight spring and fall jackets. They are indeed sub-optimal for winter coats as your hand goes in at an awkward angle if you need to stick them in the pockets to warm up, so I agree slant pockets are much preferred for a true winter coat/jacket.

    My pet peeve is vanity sizing - especially of shirts. I got a size medium LL Bean chamois shirt under the tree. Nice shirt, soft fabric, etc. Now, all of my sport coats and suits are a size 38, which put me at a medium in LL Bean's size chart - granted on the low end of medium, but medium based on chest size. I tried that thing on and it looked like a night shirt it was so huge - well beyond the bounds of a traditional full cut garment into a 6 year old wearing his dad's shirt territory. There was room for 2 of me in there. The only way that shirt could have fit someone with my chest size is if they're carrying 60-lbs lbs. of belly fat.

    The models in the LL Bean catalogs are fit and lean, and the clothes appear to fit them fine. So, why is my 38 inch chest 5'8" 155 lb frame overwhelmed by the ginormous shirt that their size chart says should fit me? Like, sell the cut you put on the models so people with normal BMIs can wear your clothes. This issue is becoming more of a problem over time with a lot of brands. For now, I can often get a decent fit by sizing down to a small but if this trend continues even that won't work. When that no longer works maybe I have to start looking at the boys section?

    I also do hate the trend towards tech fabrics for everyday wear items. Tech fabrics are great for sport-specific, workout clothes, and outdoor gear. However, I don't find petrochemical based fabrics all that comfortable for wear around the house, office or neighborhood when I'm just out walking around, hanging out, or working my desk job, etc. They don't look as good as natural fibers and they don't feel as good either, IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • whereismurder
    replied
    Originally posted by garryowen47 View Post
    2) "Tech fabrics." Menswear marketers got smart and realized they can exploit the current trend for "sustainable" and "environmentally-friendly" products by drenching products in artificial fabrics like polyester, and call it a "tech fabric." This trend of "tech fabric" is a reversion to the 1970s when everyone thought polyester was the modern, technologically-advanced fabric of the future. This time around, they're just greenwashing it. The irony is that that the man-made fibers are worse for the environment! They're all just made of plastic. Natural fibers, particularly wool, have a far lower environmental impact. I can't believe that more manufacturers of natural fabrics haven't yet pushed back against these false claims that their fabrics are unsustainable. The only company I've seen do so so far is Naadam, a small cashmere company. But now I'm just ranting...
    I hate that most polos are made out of this material now. It smells worse, stains easier, and despite the claims that they wick moisture I find they breathe worse than natural fabrics.

    My other gripe is OCBD's coming in S/M/L instead of neck and sleeve measurements.

    Leave a comment:

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