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Casual prestige/status clothing brands that are good quality and value?

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    #46
    Originally posted by mebejoseph View Post
    I've even had former co-worker lawyers gently suggest I up my watch game once or twice.
    It's a business expense then. Get the Submariner or Datejust and be done with it.

    I've had 75+ watches from Seiko to Rolex, my favorite was my vintage Datejust. It was a terrific wear anytime watch. I still kinda miss it, but practical part of me just couldn't justify having thousands of dollars tied up in a watch that was 10% better than my (at the time $250) Seiko SCVS at this point in my life, with some other big financial obligations coming over the next couple of years. However, if I were in your position, and having a banner year, at an age where you really should be enjoying your success, I'd splurge. Rolex is popular for a reason, they make a fantastic watch (there are other reasons as well, but the quality is certainly there)

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      #47
      If you don't want an expensive watch I think it's a dumb idea to get one. If your SO really thinks you need one she can get you one as a gift.
      Ben

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        #48
        Originally posted by mebejoseph View Post
        I think it's because she believes that my modest watches are incongruent with the imagine she knows I want to convey to other lawyers and to clients and that I am otherwise conveying with my clothing, shoes, haircut, etc. I've even had former co-worker lawyers gently suggest I up my watch game once or twice.
        I work in the biological sciences world. I can unequivocally state that I have never been told to "up my watch game."

        I can wear a t-shirt, shorts, and flip flops to work if I wanted to. I try to look reasonably good though and go for solid basic fashion staples like the ones featured on dappered.

        I would personally not be able to enjoy myself if my colleagues might say such a thing...but that's why we make the choices we make for careers.

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          #49
          Originally posted by mebejoseph View Post
          I think it's because she believes that my modest watches are incongruent with the imagine she knows I want to convey to other lawyers and to clients and that I am otherwise conveying with my clothing, shoes, haircut, etc. I've even had former co-worker lawyers gently suggest I up my watch game once or twice.
          Go with no watch, or buy an Apple Watch.

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            #50
            Originally posted by Loafer28 View Post
            Go with no watch, or buy an Apple Watch.
            What about one of those fancy smartwatches? I don't think anything says I am a reckless spender better than a $1,500 watch that will be obsolete in six months.

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              #51
              Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
              I have beat the hell out of my BLNR since 2013. No way someone would even pay retail for it.



              Watch "investments" remind me of car "investments." In that community, everyone thinks their run of the mill, air-cooled Porsche will appreciate in value. Select items may appreciate but people never compare the % return to say the S&P. Not to soap box more, but it is like people whose grandma bought her house in the 50s for a couple nickels and it's worth $100K now but when comparing return %, it is marginal at best.

              Exactly. Just like cars, watches, home improvements (omg it'll raise the value of our house), its just a veneer of rational decision making to justify a luxury purchase. Like you said, virtually none of them beat traditional investments unless you are a professional speculator (and even many fail to beat the market) and that assumes that you are actually ever going to sell to capitalize on it. Better to just acknowledge its a luxury purchase and enjoy it.

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                #52
                Originally posted by ianr View Post
                What about one of those fancy smartwatches? I don't think anything says I am a reckless spender better than a $1,500 watch that will be obsolete in six months.
                The basic watch is $300-$500. I piss away more in wine than that every 6 months.

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                  #53
                  Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
                  The basic watch is $300-$500. I piss away more in wine than that every 6 months.
                  It’s also not even close to obsolete after 6 months. Mine is almost 3 years old and I still use it every day.

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                    #54
                    It would get pretty tedious, I would think, for one to incessantly attempt to feed his ego by buying things said ego thinks is sufficient to display its maximum awesomeness to friends, colleagues and strangers.

                    It's a real brain drain because if you give it a Rolex, then will it also need a cooler house? Because I don't know many egos that can tolerate being watch rich and house poor.

                    Wealthy people I know wear a Rolex like it's a Timex basically. They're not even trying.

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                      #55
                      Casual prestige/status clothing brands that are good quality and value?

                      Originally posted by JBarwick View Post
                      I have beat the hell out of my BLNR since 2013. No way someone would even pay retail for it.



                      Watch "investments" remind me of car "investments." In that community, everyone thinks their run of the mill, air-cooled Porsche will appreciate in value. Select items may appreciate but people never compare the % return to say the S&P. Not to soap box more, but it is like people whose grandma bought her house in the 50s for a couple nickels and it's worth $100K now but when comparing return %, it is marginal at best.
                      Yeah, buy a watch because you like it, not because you think it’s an ‘investment’. This way down madness lies.
                      Investment in watches takes more than a tarot deck or a magic 8 ball. Rolex establishes you, it’s a cliche, but a sound one. Omega is good. Vacheron Constantin, Patek Philippe, Audmars Piguet, all of those are established brands that will turn heads. Richard Mille will too. But so will Morris Grossman, Phillipe Defour, Akrivia, and dozens of others. If watches are an itch you want to scratch, look for something that speaks to you, and don’t pull the trigger until 6 months later. Because in your research, you’ll naturally find more and more. But if, 6 months later it still speaks to you, then you’ve found the right piece.


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                      Last edited by tayloreuph; October 23, 2019, 12:22 AM.

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                        #56
                        I'm very late to this thread so I don't know if this will get any traction, but I just read this through and the spirit of the initial question was something that really resonated with me. Its something I've discussed with friends before.
                        Folks will talk about dressing for yourself until they're blue in the face, but I think if most are honest its also true that dressing well also is for cultivating a particular image-- affecting how others see us. When I started my journey to dressing better about a decade ago, yes, I wanted to wear clothes that made me happier but I also wanted to affect how I'm seen by others, i.e.,. this guy is well dressed.....he puts some thought into his style.....he has nice clothes.....and even, this guy has the means to have some nicer clothes. The later was always particularly satisfying because once you figure it out, you can look like a million bucks without spending that much (good tailoring, thrifting, ebay, this site, etc).

                        With suits it is pretty easy actually to figure out how to move up the hierarchy: start with just getting something that fits well, invest in some entry level nice brands (SuitSupply, Brooks), buy some high end ties on ebay, and work your way up to nicer brands as you accumulate the means to do so.

                        But with a casual workplace, it is just so much more confusing to do so. How does one signal and create the same impression in a more casual environment.

                        For me, its been shoes. I might wear dark denim and an OCBD to work, but so does everyone else, but I still tend to have nicer shoes than most (I'm a professor, so the bar is set pretty low for being the best dressed professor!). My shoes aren't even super high end, mostly AE, but things like suedes and monks that most folks don't wear.

                        So I guess I'm still curious in the initial premise of the thread: how do you ever so slightly set yourself apart and signal that you have both the interest and means to dress well in a world of casual wear? Note: I'm referring to what most people on this site are oriented towards: classic menswear. I'm not talking going out and buying Gucci or Prada.

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                          #57
                          Shoes definitely get the most attention I find. I am taking a night class and the other night the lady sitting across from me commented on my shoes. We had a break in the class and she turned to me and said "I really like your shoes. I find it so nice to see a man paying attention to how he dresses". All this from a pair of shoes!

                          I was flattered and thanked her for the comments. But the shoes were the gateway drug. It wasn't the Rolex, or the hair gel style, or even the OCBD. It was the shoes. This echos what [MENTION=3154]AMProf[/MENTION] said. Or at least it was for me.

                          (PS I'm on a five day business trip. Number of pairs of shoes brought - four).

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                            #58
                            Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                            Shoes definitely get the most attention I find. I am taking a night class and the other night the lady sitting across from me commented on my shoes. We had a break in the class and she turned to me and said "I really like your shoes. I find it so nice to see a man paying attention to how he dresses". All this from a pair of shoes!
                            I feel like I am wearing the $1 worth of Saphir mink oil and wax when someone says something about my shoes. That is, I could be wearing the same shoes in the condition I see other people wearing shoes and nobody would notice.

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                              #59
                              Originally posted by AMProf View Post

                              For me, its been shoes. I might wear dark denim and an OCBD to work, but so does everyone else, but I still tend to have nicer shoes than most (I'm a professor, so the bar is set pretty low for being the best dressed professor!). My shoes aren't even super high end, mostly AE, but things like suedes and monks that most folks don't wear.

                              So I guess I'm still curious in the initial premise of the thread: how do you ever so slightly set yourself apart and signal that you have both the interest and means to dress well in a world of casual wear? Note: I'm referring to what most people on this site are oriented towards: classic menswear. I'm not talking going out and buying Gucci or Prada.
                              Yes, I don't want to get into that thing of Gucci/Prada/whatever else.

                              I'm starting to wrap my brain around this--yes, shoes and yes, well-made clothing that fits well. And for me, as I am deciding, it doesn't need to communicate prestige or status or income--it just needs to avoid communicating "cheapness."

                              And communicate that I put some thought and consideration into my appearance and what I wear, without being extravagant or wasteful--which is what I want to communicate to my clients about my approach to the work I do for them.

                              So, I'm good with AE shoes, JFitzpatrick, and other similar shoes. I don't need $1,000 shoes (but I might get myself a pair for Xmas this year--I've got my eye on a few pairs of Carmina shoes).

                              I think I'm happy with the idea that a Brooks Brother of Suit Supply suit is the suit equivalent of AE.

                              Which puts me looking for the AE equivalent for resort and business casual clothing.

                              Originally posted by DocDave View Post
                              Shoes definitely get the most attention I find. I am taking a night class and the other night the lady sitting across from me commented on my shoes. We had a break in the class and she turned to me and said "I really like your shoes. I find it so nice to see a man paying attention to how he dresses". All this from a pair of shoes!

                              I was flattered and thanked her for the comments. But the shoes were the gateway drug. It wasn't the Rolex, or the hair gel style, or even the OCBD. It was the shoes. This echos what [MENTION=3154]AMProf[/MENTION] said. Or at least it was for me.

                              (PS I'm on a five day business trip. Number of pairs of shoes brought - four).
                              Originally posted by ianr View Post
                              I feel like I am wearing the $1 worth of Saphir mink oil and wax when someone says something about my shoes. That is, I could be wearing the same shoes in the condition I see other people wearing shoes and nobody would notice.
                              Yeah--shoes! I can't seem to figure out how to bring fewer than five pairs on this almost two week trip. I think it's going to need to be at least six or seven when I count my workout shoes and some sandals for the pool area.

                              And with my size 12.5 shoes, that takes up an entire small suitcase.
                              WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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                                #60
                                Originally posted by mebejoseph View Post
                                Yeah--shoes! I can't seem to figure out how to bring fewer than five pairs on this almost two week trip. I think it's going to need to be at least six or seven when I count my workout shoes and some sandals for the pool area.

                                And with my size 12.5 shoes, that takes up an entire small suitcase.
                                I have admittedly looked at shoe sample cases to pack shoes. They are supposed to be for travelling shoe salespeople and bringing shoes for display at trade shows, but I just want them to bring a bunch of shoes on an airplane without them floating around in a suitcase.

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