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    Oxford Shoes

    What do you guys think of oxfords?

    I do not have a black pair of oxfords. I work in a business casual office, and we occasionally wear suits. I found a couple of toe cap oxfords one black and one dark brown on ebay, that are good year welted and are brand new. I can get them for a very good price, but I find oxfords really boring looking, especially black ones.

    What does everyone hear think of toe cap oxfords as far as styling goes.

    #2
    I haven't worn mine in a couple years. Not needed in black.

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      #3
      I don't own a plain cap toe Oxford. I do have AE Strands--which are awesome because lots of broguing. I also, personally, don't get to hung up on the oxford/derby distinction.

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        #4
        Much more of a loafer guy.

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          #5
          I prefer the look of an oxford over a derby, I think. And I prefer brogue over plain or cap-toe. That said, my black AE Park Avenue cap toe shoes are my go-to for court.
          WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

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            #6
            I wear them all the time for business, most certainly including black. For business casual/sometimes with a suit, I'd suggest a brown Strand.

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              #7
              Oxford is a broad category of shoes, akin to asking what we think about running shoes.

              As such, oxfords can run from the plainest of balmorals, suitable for white/black tie, to heavily decorated full-brogue longwing bluchers, appropriate for business casual and even jeans.

              I prefer a sleeker design so, while I own a full-brogue cap toe balmoral, the majority of my dress oxfords are plain toes or plain toes with a perforated medallion such as the AE Vernon and Cornwallis.

              Plain doesn't have to mean boring. Decoration such as broguing or perfing can give the eye something to notice, but if the shape of the shoe is attractive enough it will stand on its own. Think Jaguar E-Type or a Coco Chanel little black dress. More would be less.

              That said, the stubby toe caps on the AE Fifth Avenue throw the proportions off, and most cheaper dress shoes have a bulbous shape that is best hidden behind broguing.

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                #8
                In general, a boring suit-and-tie goes better with a pair of boring oxfords than fun, loud bluchers.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Galcobar View Post
                  Oxford is a broad category of shoes, akin to asking what we think about running shoes.

                  As such, oxfords can run from the plainest of balmorals, suitable for white/black tie, to heavily decorated full-brogue longwing bluchers, appropriate for business casual and even jeans.
                  And even sneakers.

                  https://www.allenedmonds.com/shoes/s...r/SF70180.html
                  WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by mebejoseph View Post
                    I do not understand how they can call that an oxford. It sure as hell wouldn't qualify under the eponymous Oxford school dress code.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Galcobar View Post
                      I do not understand how they can call that an oxford. It sure as hell wouldn't qualify under the eponymous Oxford school dress code.
                      its marketing. you can call anything anything. doesn't make it that thing.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Galcobar View Post
                        I do not understand how they can call that an oxford. It sure as hell wouldn't qualify under the eponymous Oxford school dress code.
                        To quote wikipedia:


                        An Oxford shoe is characterized by shoelace eyelets tabs that are attached under the vamp,[1] a feature termed "closed lacing".[2] This contrasts with Derbys, or bluchers, which have shoelace eyelets attached to the top of the vamp. Originally, Oxfords were plain, formal shoes, made of leather, but they evolved into a range of styles suitable for formal, uniform, or casual wear.

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_shoe

                        So, now it's not a matter of formality, but how the shoelace eyelet tabs are attached to the vamp.

                        And to make it more confusing, you will find several shoe retail websites that lump oxford and derby under the same category of "oxfords," which they use to mean "dress" shoes.

                        For example, Nordstrom Rack and Kenneth Cole call this derby/blucher an "oxford," but it's not:

                        https://www.nordstromrack.com/shop/p...rd?color=BLACK
                        WHY ARE THE GUYS IN SUITS HERE? HAS SOMETHING GONE WRONG?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I like an oxford for more dressed up styling and have the AE Park Avenue in oxblood as well as the AE Cornwallis in black. If you think a black cap toe is boring, go with something like the Cornwallis - a plain, medallion toe, perhaps.

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